Goat Problems.

Discussion in 'Goats' started by orion, Jun 13, 2004.

  1. orion

    orion Guest

    Hello first off I would like to know if it is safe to put goats and cows in the same pasture and safe to let goats eat what the cows eat.

    my fiances uncle has a few goats, 6 or 7, and one is pregnant. they have a huge area to excercise and plenty of water. about two of them are large, one being the pregnant doe, the others are small. all the goats accept for the pregnanat one seem to be experiencing some kind of leg pain. One goat walks completely on its front legs and holds the back ones up in the air, one goat has severe problems with its front legs and walking on them, since this has happened the goats seem tired and lazy, some of the goats hooves are very cracked and damaged looking.

    can anyone tell me what the problem could be, we are having problems getting a vet to travel to our area how can we determine whats wrong and how to treat them?

    other then their inability to walk right they look healthy, their fur and eyes are ok. this seems to have started near the end of winter. before he had all the cows

    thanks for your help.
     
  2. orion

    orion Guest

    ok well we think it may be white muscle disorder, so thanks for all the replys :D
     

  3. Patt

    Patt Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,049
    Joined:
    May 18, 2003
    Location:
    Ouachitas, AR
    Do you trim their hooves regularly? It sounds more like they may have hoof problems rather than white muscle.
    We have goats and cows in the same pasture with no problems, goats eat the weeds and cows eat the grass. :)
    Patt
     
  4. cattlemanswife

    cattlemanswife New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2004
    Location:
    TN
    I had this same experience this spring with 2 does and 2 babies. The babies had severely bent front legs, laid around a majority of the time due to the pain, and when I picked them up, they smelled like rot.
    I asked everyone and studied every book or web site I could get hold of and in the end it just was just foot rot.
    These goats had been brought to me by a neighbor who had them in a dry lot with some feeder calves. We all thought they had foundered or something since they had free choice of the high protein cow feed but after treating everyone for foot rot, they are perfectly normal.
    Pick up their feet and check in between for any moist places in there. The smell should tell you before your eyes do. If they have it, treat every day with copper-tox until all visible signs are gone.
     
  5. Well, my first thought is also foot rot. Goats need to have their hooves trimmed fairly regularly. Overgrown hooves combined with damp weather is a sure recipe for problems. You need to get them where you can examine those hooves, and probably do some trimming up. Then spray those feet every day with 10% iodine until they get better.
    We buy the iodine in the pharmacy area of Walmart.
    mary
     
  6. okgoatgal2

    okgoatgal2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Joined:
    May 28, 2002
    Location:
    oklahoma
    first, find a knowledgeable goat person in your area to come show you how to trim those cracked, damaged looking hooves. like horses, they need trimmed regularly-depends on the goat and the ground they are on how often. hoof rot is the next thing i'd look at-the smell is awful and it hurts like the dickens-imagine an infection set up under all your toenails, separating them from the skin of your toe.....

    white muscle is linked to a mineral deficiency (um...selinium if i remember correctly) and can be remedied most effectively by a shot of selinium (as in Bo-Se...available from your vet)

    yes, goats and cows can be pastured together...make sure the cattle feed doesn't have...um....ok, so it's left my brain right now...i'll remember later and edit this post then, but there's something found in some cattle feeds that will kill a goat-starts with an "a" i think....but, goats that are just for brush clearing and enjoyment don't need much grain or a high protein % anyway.

    last, please, when you find that knowledgeable goat person, make friends w/them and learn from them...goats are so much fun and can give so much joy for just a little routine maintenance.

    if you need help finding a goat person around you, pm me w/your location and i'll look thru the adga directory to see if i can find someone close to you that has goats.