Goat Milking 101

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Kimon, Oct 1, 2006.

  1. Kimon

    Kimon Not a Cannibal

    Messages:
    358
    Joined:
    May 1, 2005
    Location:
    Alabama
    Ok got the stanchion, the pail, and the feed for my girl while she is on stanchion. We have been milking her twice a day for the dogs but we would like to use the milk ourselves.. How about some do's and don'ts.

    What about udder care and cleaning?
    Milk storage
    Sanitation etc.
     
  2. full sun

    full sun Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    357
    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Location:
    Western North Carolina
    This is what I do--

    I wipe the udders and teats with a one step prep wipe (from Hoeggers)
    I dry it with a paper towel I check the first squirt of milk (each teat)for irregularities (blood. flakes, etc...).
    After I am done milking, I spray the teats with Fight Bac (from Hoeggers)
    I quickly take the milk into the house and strain it with a new filter paper into a pitcher and put the pitcher into the freezer for a while. Then I transfer it into the fridge. I keep it uncovered. We get almost exactly a days worth. I use it or pitch it before it is 24 hours old because I do not pasturize. My goat has been tested for CL and Brucellosis and TB.
    I wash the pitcher, funnel and ring for straining and pail with dish soap and then sanitize with bleach or bleach powder (from Hoeggers). All my stuff is stainless steel.

    Hope that helps. And I wish you success!!

    Jennifer
     

  3. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,727
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2003
    Yep, what Jennifer said. Cleanliness and quick cool is extremely important. Some people have a bucket of ice water handy to set the milk in immediately after milking. I've always kept fresh milk in a covered glass jar.
     
  4. pookshollow

    pookshollow Pook's Hollow

    Messages:
    4,570
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Well, first I brush the doe off (it's an old horse dandy brush) to get rid of any loose hair, hay, dirt etc. Then I wash the udder with warm water and commercial udder wash (TSC), and dry the udder with a fresh paper towel. The barn kittens get the first couple of squirts - I don't usually check the milk unless I have a reason - fer instance, when Polly first came fresh, she had clots in her milk on one side. Turned out to be old milk as she was very hard to dry off - CMT test was negative.

    After milking, I use teat dip (TSC again :) ), give the doe a handful of BOSS as a thank-you, and put her back in the pen. Repeat for second goat.

    I strain the milk through a coffee filter in a stainless steel colander, into 1.5 litre widemouth canning jars. It goes into the freezer for an hour (or more, if I forget about it!) then into the fridge.

    I don't pasteurize either, and we've used it up to a week old with no problems. Usually though, I make cheese before then as the fridge is too full. Now that the kids are weaned, I'm making cheese every other day - Polly is giving 5.5-6 litres, which is waaay more than we can drink. Not that I'm complaining. :p
     
  5. Idahoe

    Idahoe Menagerie More~on

    Messages:
    2,045
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2006
    Location:
    It won't stop raining
    Ditto, how the milk is handled will determine how long it is good for.

    I use Western Family baby wipes, and run a dog brush under the belly for loose hairs and hay.

    I use Hoegger's iodine teat dip, but have heard a weak bleach solution is just as effective. When I run out of iodine, I'm switching.

    I also put the strainer right in the bucket while milking. Nothing can get into the milk and "marinate" until I take it in the house. B/c I have dogs, chickens and geese running around stirring up dust, feathers etc, between milkings I cover the bucket with a towel. The stanchion is outside the pen.

    I put it in quart jars, no lid, and into the deep freeze. I usually forget it and it mostly freezes. Then I put it in the fridge with a lid.

    The milk is good for several days. When I only put it in the fridge, it started smelling funky in three days or so.
     
  6. apirlawz

    apirlawz playing in the dirt

    Messages:
    281
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2003
    Location:
    Northern MN
    My turn! My turn! :p

    First, I brush the girls, (same thing, dandy brush), then wash the udder with unscented baby wipes. I always add about a third of a bottle of rubbing alcohol to a large canister of wipes. I milk into a stainless steel, seamless pail. Immediately after milking, I strain the milk into another stainless steel pail. My strainer ~ don't laugh ~ is slapped together using very clean flour sack dishtowel fabric, a disemboweled soda bottle, and a strategically placed rubber band. Then I set that pail, uncovered, into a large basin of ice water that I keep in the milkroom fridge (really nice if you can swing it!) I clean udders again with the wipes, then use a balm (shea and lavender...some of my soaping ingredients) to counter the drying of the alcohol.

    The milk stays good for quite a while, although I've never actually kept any for more than a week. Any extra is frozen in ice cube trays for soap making, and soon, I'll be starting with cheese...

    The key, I think, is to filter immediately, and chill as quickly as humanly possible. Oh yeah, and keep the buck out of the doe's barn! :stars:
     
  7. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,569
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2003
    Location:
    CHINA
    I use a baby wipe to clean if milk is for the house...for the calf or other animal I use a separate pail and not too fussy about it :shrug:

    I strain w/ coffee filter placed into adesignated funnel over quart jars, freeze for 1hr and use it up or can milk for Spring kids or chickens during real cold snaps in winter.

    To can milk in boiling water bath....fill jars, and warm gently over an hour (from cold fridge) then boil in water bath for 1hr

    Simple cheese (good for salads and lasagna) heat milk till it just starts to boil, remove from heat add vinegar, stir (about 2 tbs for 1/2 gal) or enough to separate curds and whey....pour thru colander (catch whey for doggies) lined w/ fine cheescloth or old piece of sheet....collect corners of cheescloth..hang it and let it drip for a day and add salt....I like garlic pepper on mine :)
     
  8. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,727
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2003
    This thread taught me a lot about milking goats. Thought I'd bump it up for anyone who missed it the first time around.
     
  9. BlueHeronFarm

    BlueHeronFarm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,370
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2007
    Location:
    Texas
    This is pretty close to what we do, but with just a goat or two, it goes right into mason jars. (No chance of your goat stepping in a mason jar) Then when we get inside we filter into different (clean) jars.

    Really with smaller quantities - like a quart - you can just put it in the fridge and it will get cool enough, fast enough. You don't have to bother with the freezer if you don't want.

    Ours keeps for a couple weeks when handled this way.
     
  10. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

    Messages:
    30,882
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Texas Coastal Bend/S. Missouri
    Purchased wipes are very expensive. We get the blue shop paper towels. Cut the roll in half. The half roll fits perfectly in a plastic Folgers 'can.'

    We make our own teat dip / udder wipe liquid.
    One quart water.
    One ounce bleach.
    One teaspoon Original Blue Dawn dishwashing liquid.
    One teaspoon lavendar massage oil or other moisturizer.

    Pour enough in the Folgers can with the half roll blue shop towels to get them moist enough for udder wiping.

    Pour some in a plastic mug for dipping the teats after milking.

    I'll take pictures later!
     
  11. Rockytopsis

    Rockytopsis A & N Lazy Pond Farm Supporter

    Messages:
    3,376
    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    Location:
    East Tennessee
    Rose,
    That is a great idea, thanks.
    Nancy
     
  12. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    12,617
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2005
    Location:
    MI
    I do mine a little different.

    From Menards I bought a bunch of little 1/2 gallon plastic buckets for milk storage in the fridge (ziploc bags), udder wash, and feed weighing. They cost like .90 or something.

    My udder wash is 2tbs clorox bleach, a 'squirt' of regular blue dawn dishwashing soap, and about a qt of warm water. This is from the Fiasco Farm site. It is much less harsh on the udders than any commercial dip. a bottle of dish soap lasts about 2 gallons of bleach... the bleach lasts 3-4 weeks or so, and total about 4.00/month or so. I wash the udder pre milking and check the udder/goat.

    I have a stainless mini strainer(15.00 hoeggers), a little 2qt stainless bucket (3.00 from jeffers pet... It's cheaper to buy ss buckets from a kennel supply than to buy them as 'milking' buckets, though they are the same thing), two 6 qt stainless stock pots from family dollar. I milk into one stock pot, then strain into the 2qt bucket. I pour that into the other stock pot which also has frozen mini pop bottles in it to quickly chill the milk. After milking I dip both teats and let them down from the stand. When the milk gets in the house it is usually very well chilled. It is then bagged in ziplocs and stored in the bottom of my fridge. It may be frozen, canned, or consumed.
     
  13. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    12,617
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2005
    Location:
    MI
    the only bad thing about this is that the bleach will dissipate shortly after mixing, so they no longer have their disinfecting properties after a day or so.
     
  14. DocM

    DocM Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,314
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2006
    Location:
    NW OR
    Wash hands before and after each goat.
    I use dairy wipes purchased from jeffers for udder cleaning prior to milking. I do not use teat dip or udder cream after milking.
    Wash hands
    I milk into stainless milking buckets whether hand or machine milking
    After each goat milk is strained through regular milk strainer with strainer filters
    Milk is processed through pasteurizer
    Poured into 1/2 gallon canning jars and placed in ice bath for 15 minutes
    Place in fridge that's set to 36 degrees.
    Everything I use is stainless and is washed in dairy wash, final rinse of bleach water - 1 tbsp per gallon.
    UV light destroyes the antiseptic properties of bleach, if stored in opaque container, it will not lose its effectiveness.
    My milk room is set up like a commercial kitchen, stove top, stainless counters, stainless wash sinks, propane hot water, ice machine, stainless fridge, milk goes from parlor to milk room to customer or my table. Appliances are from a totaled RV and cost me less than $200 to install. I have three counter-top pasteurizers and a turkey fryer.
     
  15. Goatguy

    Goatguy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    432
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2007
    Location:
    Michigan
    All the sanitation and such is great, but really, as long as you and your family are healthy, alot of it is more hassle than it is helpful.

    Myself, I've always put a pan under the goat, milked her (I check the first squirts, but thats it, no cleaning udders, not teat dip or anything). I then take the milk inside, weigh it, and record it. I then visually inspect the milke, if I see dirt or hair, I'll strain it, if not, in a mason jar and then into the fridge it goes. My milk will stay good for over a week (never lasts that long unless I take a gallon to work for my lunches for that week).

    My family and I have never once gotten sick, We are all healthy and I figure out body's are fully capable of fending off any bacteria if the need is there, gotta at least give the immune system a chance anyhow ;)

    If you plan to sell your milk, then by all means, go through all the hoops, but if its just for your family and your comfortable with your goats cleanliness and food, just drink the stuff until it tastes bad, No need to ever throw out milk after just one day. Its how people have been doing it for 1000's of years and mostly without refridgerators even. There is nothing in that milk or on that doe that will kill you, most likely nothing that would even make you sick.
     
  16. RedTartan

    RedTartan Icelandic Sheep Supporter

    Messages:
    3,344
    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Location:
    Northeast Ohio
    I'm not nearly as sanitary as everyone else seems to be either... I didn't know I was supposed to do all that stuff!

    I wash Mocha's udder, but I didn't know to discard the first couple squirts. I've always strained the milk through a coffee filter though. And then I put it straight into the fridge.

    I hate straining the milk. It takes forever for it to go through the coffee filter. Is there another type of filter I can use? A friend of mine says her MIL used old, clean tee-shirts to strain the milk(!!!!!), and I just couldn't do that.

    :) RedTartan
     
  17. gryndlgoat

    gryndlgoat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    567
    Joined:
    May 27, 2005
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    I used to use paper coffee filters too, but switched last year to a nylon "permanent" coffee filter basket that I bought at the local grocers (was next to the boxes of paper filters). It filters much faster and fits nicely inside my wide mouth canning funnel.

    I milk into a stainless steel stock pot and filter directly into 1 litre canning jars, just pouring the milk through the nylon coffee filter. After milking, the stock pot is washed with dish soap and then works as my pasteurizer. (Yes I am a wimp- I like pasteurized milk, and we feed it to baby puppies).
     
  18. nehimama

    nehimama An Ozark Engineer Supporter

    Messages:
    9,818
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Location:
    Powhatan, AR
    Ditto on the "permanent" coffee filters. They work great; be sure to clean well after milking. I invested in a couple of the "gold mesh" ones because they really get a workout here.

    I've found the milk did not chill quickly enough if put into the freezer. What works best for me is putting the container(s) of milk into an ice water bath. Milk is chilled to 40 degrees or lower in about 30 min this way. I read somewhere in my research that you want the milk to chill as quickly as possible, and the freezer doesn't do as good a job.

    NeHi
     
  19. nehimama

    nehimama An Ozark Engineer Supporter

    Messages:
    9,818
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Location:
    Powhatan, AR
    Last year I got one of the mini strainers from Hoegger Goat Supply. Could NOT figure out how to insert the filter disc, and the unit did not come with instructions. (Guess I should've called Hoegger, huh?)

    Can anybody explain the procedure?

    Anyway, I sent it back, and have been using the "gold" mesh coffee filters to my great satisfaction.

    NeHi
     
  20. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

    Messages:
    6,244
    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Location:
    Arkansas
    I'm also not as disciplined. I wipe the udder and belly down good with just a moistened paper towel. First squirt from each teat goes to the eager cat. Then I milk away into the stainless steel bucket. When it's cold like it is now (20 degrees right now) I will hang the bucket up on a nail where the cats can't get to it while I let the doe finish her food and feed the other animals. I then take it in and strain it (whether I see anything in it or not, there's always a hair or *something*. I just use a paper towel to strain, it can't be the cheap kind though, or it doesn't flow through it. Then I just stick it in the fridge in glass quart or 1/2 gallon jars. We use the milk in 1-2 days. If I were selling it, I would be more picky.