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Discussion Starter #1
We have an Alpine that has been going down hill, losing weight, not eating very much and throwing up. We heard that Activated Charcoal from Walmart works good. Blend it up and put some oil in it. Just wondering how much I should give to her? And any suggestions on her problems would be helpful.
Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It has not been going on very long. We wormed her when she kidded in July and wormed her again recently. No, no one else in the herd is sick. She is a very heavy milker (2 gallons a day) so I am assuming it just brought her down to much. She has always been a smaller goat.
 

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Charcoal is going to help with an acute poisoning type situation. If this has been going on for more than a day, it's probably not an acute poisoning situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I really don't think it would hurt to at least try it?
I just need to know how much to give her, because I don't want to give her so much she gets poisoned yet I don't want to give her so little it does not take effect.
 

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Charcoal itself is not toxic, but it may not be helpful for the situation and I tend to go easy on things in large amounts in a ruminant stomach because you want the rumen environment to be as steady as possible all the time. I'd go easy on the oil if possible. This paste has 100mg/ml and the dose is 1-3ml per kg for goats - so 100-300mg per kg (Another place I found said 1-3 grams per kg). http://www.drugs.com/vet/activated-charcoal-paste.html

Take her temperature. Note any other signs - what color are her membranes? What is her fecal consistency? Any eye/nasal discharge? How long has this been going on? What is her body weight and how long has she been loosing weight? The fact that theirs vomiting makes me wonder if she is blocked or has a choke or something... Or frothy bloat? I would not call vomiting a normal symptom for goats to have.
 

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From Goat Medicine:
In all cases of sudden death, when plant toxicity is suspected, additional animals at risk should be removed from the potential source and given activated charcoal orally at a minimum dose of 2 g/kg bw
So I'd use 2-3 g/kg bw, not mg.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well I would say she started really vomiting end of October. She never was a fat
goat and for the fact that she is a heavy milker and only 3 months into lactation
we thought it normal that she was a little under weight it was not badly under weight or anything. Then she vomited one time in the stand (did not think much of it, thought maybe choked or something) but she started getting slower, not keeping up with herd, losing weight (noticeably), dropping in milk production and started vomiting whenever we put her on the stand. She only vomits on the stand, we put her on wait for her to start gagging then take her off put her outside wait till she is done and then bring her back in to milk and give her grain. We also give her red cell twice a day. Also found out she really likes apples, so we are giving her a little bit of those. I think she is getting better, this is the first time she has not thrown up (this morning) and appears to be feeling slightly chipper.

So the only reason you would know anything is wrong is the weight, drop in milk, slowness and vomiting otherwise she appears fine.

Would 6 ML twice a day be to much? (of charcoal mix)
 

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What exactly does the vomit look like. Is it foamy or just pulverize feed bits. If foamy , I would expect that her teeth need attention and she is unable to properly chew her feed before swallowing and then actually choking.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It is foamy, green, with food bits in it.
That does sound like an idea, teeth need checking, but how does one go about checking a goat's teeth?
I have never really heard about checking a goats teeth, is there something I need to look for or?
 

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You can feel on the molars if there are any sharp edges. Unless you have the proper tools, a vet is probably called for. I wanted to clarify how your doe acts on the stand. Does she shake her head and start slinging her head with the foam coming out? Also , is the stand the only place where she is getting fed grain? Perhaps you could experiment and feed her grain in a bucket on the ground and observe how she chews and swallows. If she is a sloppy Eater or bolts her grain , and then goes into the gagging, choking foamy bit it's all about the teeth.
 
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