Goat meat

Discussion in 'Goats' started by myheaven, Jun 3, 2006.

  1. myheaven

    myheaven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What does goat meat taste like. Dh wants sheep. HE likes lamb chops. I want goats. HE says goats are to picky about grass (per his buddy). Ohh to have goat milk(never had It). We had a pet billy goat that always butted my spoiled rotten cousin :dance: :) I loved that little guy. lol I have read alot about goats in my adult life and i know they will not eat hay once its dirty. Well neither will cow rabbit sheep. I dont think it makes a goat "PICKY"

    While im at it what does goat milk taste like? I know it makes great soap.

    I would realy like something to eat all the black berry bushes in my back.
     
  2. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    Goat milk tastes like milk, LOL! I've done taste tests with lots of people over the years, and I've never had anyone who could tell me which glass was goat milk and which was cow milk.

    Goats are, by nature, browsers, which means they eat more like deer than like cattle. If you put most breeds of goats out on a pasture of nothing but grass, they would not be happy. They do learn to eat it eventually, but they prefer things like blackberries, tree branches, weeds, and brush. So in one sense your husband is right. (Some goats, such as Boers -- a meat breed, though they can also milk quite well -- actually do graze like sheep.) In many pastures, with some weeds and brush growing up, and maybe some small trees, goats and sheep will complement one another quite well, as the sheep prefer the shorter, finer grasses. Keep in mind, though, that even on pasture goats need access to hay (unless it's a REALLY good pasture, with plenty of feed). They also need some grain (if they are growing or giving milk), fresh water, loose goat mineral (not sheep mineral, which doesn't have enough copper for goats -- but goat mineral has a toxic amount of copper for sheep), worming as needed (depends on several factors -- you should talk to a vet knowledgeable about your area), and regular hoof trimmings. Sheep, of course, will need to be sheared at least once a year.

    You are right about goats not eating anything they've gotten dirty. This protects them to some extent from internal parasites and diseases, but it also makes it challenging to build feeders for them. The feeder needs to be one the goats can't get into, one that prevents them from wasting too much hay (they are bad hay wasters, too), and sturdy enough that they can't bust it up. Water containers should ideally be set outside of their fence, which somewhat prevents droppings from ending up in the water -- just make sure the goats can safely get their heads through the fence to drink.

    Fencing for goats -- and sheep -- is another challenge. Both types of animal tend to be escape artists. I've gone to using cattle panels for my goat pens. A small Kinder kid can still get through (and I have one right now who pops in and out as she pleases, little scamp), and a large breed goat CAN jump out if they want to bad enough, but generally the cattle panels seem to be one of the best available solutions to the fencing problem. HOT electric fencing can work, if you can make absolutely sure that the fence is good and hot at all times. I wouldn't use it for perimeter fencing, though -- you need more of a physical barrier there. Scared or startled goats can and will go right through even a hot fence and hardly even notice it was there. A stray dog in the pasture, one of your neighbors setting off fireworks on the Fourth of July . . . been there, done that. Chased goats and sheep all up and down the highway afterwards, too.

    Goat meat tastes sort of like venison, only better, IMO. It's good meat. I don't much care for lamb, at least not most of the lamb I've had (and I'm not a picky eater when it comes to meat, as I was raised on moose, buffalo, caribou, bear, and whatever else we happened to get). Goat meat, though, is good.

    Kathleen
     

  3. myheaven

    myheaven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    thank you kathleen. My dh LOVES venison. We have a 4 strand eletric fence going up two of the strands are barbed. I have never had lamb nor goat. Just chicken beef turkey rabbit hog deer. Deer i have a hard time eating due to nasty experiances(sp).
     
  4. debd0712

    debd0712 Well-Known Member

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    The goat meat I have had (haven't had much, was never a choice cut, and was store purchased) has the consistency of pork but is sweeter than beef. It is very, very good. Even our children gobbled it down. We have just recently started raising enough goats so that we will now have some to butcher - finally got out of the city. I can't wait to try our own homegrown goat meat - and best of all I know exactly what went into it.

    Goat milk is wonderful. Much better than any milk you can buy in the stores. Very sweet, rich and creamy. When we still had children living at home all of their friends would beg for goat milk when they came over. With six children and only milking 4 mini goats we rarely had much extra milk, but tried always to accomodate the children's friends. It was surprising how many of the children had never even seen a live goat!

    Goats are picky with some things, but no more so than most other animals. Our horses waste at least as much hay as the goats ever have. As far as brush cleanup goats are definitely the way to go. We had to fence off the patches of blackberry bushes we wanted to save. The multiflora roses we had everywhere are rapidly disappearing.

    I am not very familiar with sheep (have only ever owned one), but from what I have heard goats and sheep are supposedly somewhat complimentary in their browsing - goats prefer browse/brush and sheep weeds and grass. You could certainly have both. Just make sure you have really good fences if you get goats - they are escape artists. Goats are also very intelligent - almost like a dog. The biggest difference is dogs want to please you and goats want to please themselves. I also doubt you would find a sheep showing you much affection (could be wrong), but goats will as long as they are handled.

    Debbie
     
  5. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    I've also never had anyone try our goat's milk who could tell a difference between cow/goat milk. Good stuff.

    We were given some goat meat - a shoulder roast, and we've butchered one of our bucklings. Both times, even my picky eater wanted more 'chicken', lol. The buckling was pit roasted - and was amazing. If I could wean my family off of beef entirely and switch to goat - I would. Much more feasable for small acreage, not to mention the $$ we'd save butchering ourselves. Haven't gotten up the nerve to butchering anything as big as a pig or steer yet. Someday!

    I feed my goats alfalfa pellets - no waste that way. I throw them some alfalfa hay as a treat a few times a week - and they love it so much they clean it up. No waste. Now, when I fed just hay - they were very wasteful. But I had a pony who needed a 'light' diet, and the stalky left-overs worked out great for her.

    If you need a 'mower' get meat goats, aka boers. Even percentage boers (dairy cross)will eat grass if they've been raised on it. They'd prefer your bushes and blackberries though! If you need a lawn mower - you could have sheep and goats.......but my solutions always seem to involve more animals! ;)

    Niki