Goat Died After 2 Weeks

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Helena, May 18, 2005.

  1. Helena

    Helena Well-Known Member

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    The last couple of weeks I've been asking all of you for your advice. Should have taken most of it and perhaps not listened to the vet. My nubian doe died last night of after 2 weeks on cor-rid..2 doses of Ivermec ( IM) and kaopectate. She had kidded 2 weeks ago with triplets..wormed her with the Ivermec..then 1 week later she began with very loose watery stools. Sent specimen to vet..began regime of cor-rid for coccidious (sp?) and strongyle (sp) worms. The last week she seemed to have improved "pastey" stools then 2 nights ago she went down with watery stools agaiin. Took sample to vet and waited 2 days until heard the reply this AM. The vet was away..no sample tested. So...now she is gone..triplets to feed...of course the little doe won't accept bottle but I realize she will eat soon enought hopefully. I'm so very disappointed in....myself...for not listening to my years of goats myself choices and yours too. I feel as though she was literally "medicated to death" with the cor-rid. Perhaps I'm wrong but she was my best and in health goat for many years and until the day she dropped was eating and drinking fine. :waa: So..now I'm hating all vets...don't think this vet knows much on goats. Of course the one that did isn't practiceing any longer. Spent a very long day at the voting elections table yesterday as Judge of elections ( 7 AM to 12 AM then barn until 3 AM) ...hate my job..and so....I'm not in the best of moods either. :rolleyes: I know this too will pass but really think I should have changed medications the second week as I had suggested to vet and used my own judgement. So..now I'm Daphne's replacement Mommma to her babies..waaaaaaaaaaa! :waa:
     
  2. Starsmom

    Starsmom Well-Known Member

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    I'm sorry about your doe. It is always so easy to second guess yourself. I had a similar experience with a filly of mine. She cut her leg and it got infected. I dosed her according to the vet after a few days, I felt it was too much so I cut it back on my own. It was too late, she developed severe diarrhea and I dealt with that and about 2 days after it cleared, she dropped in the corral, had a heart attack. Apparently she had been born with a heart murmur and all the meds and illness was just too much for her. What really made me mad was the vet recognized her and had treated her before and the previous owner never disclosed her condition to me. Although she was given to me because they couldn't care for her (no land) I only had her two months before she died. Long enough to get attached, but no long enough to justify the medical bills. Had to have her autopsied just to make sure she had not brought something into my herd. I think back and see where I made my mistakes and feel so bad thinking she would be alive today if only..... You just can't think that way... Easier said than done, but all you can do is learn from the experience and if it happens again, you will know what to do. Good Luck with the kids.
     

  3. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    Just in case you don't know, the most critical thing I've found in getting kids to accept a bottle once they're accustomed to nursing mom is the temperature of the milk. If it's too cool or too warm, they won't touch it. It can cool down enough while you're fighting with them to make it too cool to drink, so it pays to bring a pail of nearly boiling water out with you and dunk the bottle from time to time. I'm very sorry for your loss, and wish you the best of luck with the kids.
     
  4. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    Well, crap! That's the worst possible outcome.

    You know, vets do their best to keep on top of all the different medications and how they affect all the different animals. At the end of the day, though, they're human. Sometimes they make mistakes and sometimes they are going on hunches that turn out to be wrong.

    I am so sorry about your doe! I know how attatched I am to my goats and can only imagine what you're going through losing her and feeding her babies.

    Don't beat yourself up over this. You did your best for that doe. Your vet gave you advice that must have made sense at the time, or you wouldn't have followed it. Sometimes animals die, no matter what we do. All we can do is learn from that death and move on. Give those babies a kiss on their soft little noses for me. And take care of yourself.
     
  5. Ksar

    Ksar Member

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    So So sorry to hear she didn't make it. :waa:
    I remember reading your post, sometimes its not the fact of the medication and maybe an overload of it, the toxicity from the dead worms, and bacteria was likely a bigger cause. I have learned to try every method of cure from a natural route first. As I do not like to use antibiotics, because of the damage it does while curing. But sometimes it really is needed. Don't be to hard on yourself, I have shared your situation, sometimes it just doesn't work out. No matter how good or bad the vet, medication, or care.
    I agree with the previous comment about the temp of the milk, even bottle babes will reject a off temp bottle. Mine were lucky to have fresh warm milk from the cow, right after milking. Mine preferred it at about 99-100 degrees, had triplet premies(one died 6 hours after CS birth, one was fed by syringe 5-10ml at a time for 2 weeks every 2-3 hours),one rejected kid and 2 sale kids. Fed them a 20 oz. soda bottle 3/4 full twice a day, 3-4X's a day for the premies in the beginning. Another tip that may entice the lil doe to nurse, is to pat, rub, or scratch around, near her tail head. Its like the cheek rub reflex in human babies.
    Wishing you the best of luck with them and here if you need.
    Kathy
     
  6. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    The best advice I can give you is to learn. Most vets don't even take courses in small ruminants, certainly not parisitology....most vets also won't admit to you they are simply using sheep or cattle information. So you have to learn yourself. There are excellent sites saanendoah.com dairygoatsplus.com fiascofarm.com that has folks who have had goats for a very long time that will help you. Get a 3 ring binder, print out the information on the sites and put them into catagories, nutrition, worming, cocci, meds etc. You will have a better book than you can buy. But until you can decern between the good information out there and the poor information, find yourself a mentor. All states have goat clubs ADGA.org lists all of them.

    Not one breeder and no vet that know anything would tell you to give Ivermectin IM. Not even Subq unless you were going after lice, mites or nose bots. She died from dehydration and anemia from worms, because she was really never wormed. Switch to Cydectin, use 1cc per 25 pounds and give it by mouth, give it now, repeat in 10 days and then 10 days again, this breaks the cycle of the adult worms on your place. Put the goats into the backyard or tie them for 12 hours, let them poop out all the worms and large and eggs into a place that they do not live, so they do not reifest themselves. Spend some time cleaning the barn and surrounding area while they are out. Make them feeders that they can not stand or poop in, hay feeders that are up at eye level, clean the waterers and trim their feet, so they don't track worm eggs back into the barn.

    Spend some time readying about nutrition and minerals, because those are the two things that improve immune function in your goats. With a good strong immune system they will not go down after kidding like this doe did, they will have the ability to fight off worm burdens.

    I am soo sorry you lost the doe, but use it to learn from your mistakes and make life better for the remaining stock, especially the babies. Please find out everything you can about bottle feeding, do not move to milk replacer, use grocery store milk, get a tube of probiotics and give it to the kids each day until the tube is gone....better yet, make some kefir and add it to the warm bottle just before feeding. Good luck. Vicki
     
  7. Helena

    Helena Well-Known Member

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    Thanks all for some very good, good advice. I realize even after all of these years that I and most vets don't know everything but I wish I had listened more to myself in this situation. But..the kids are drinking well, even the little doe is taking to a small bottle 4 times a day now and they are drinking from the bucket and nibbling on hay and grass. I do have another doe and her one kid with them to just..sort of..feel a little protected. Or perhaps it's just for me to feel as though they have "someone" near them. Not that this doe cares to even look at them though !! I do believe I will separate thelm from this doe soon and get them started on grain with the medicated feed. Maybe I will post this question and get some feed back and doing that. Thanks again !!