goat barn fire

Discussion in 'Goats' started by No Regrets Farm, Jan 23, 2005.

  1. No Regrets Farm

    No Regrets Farm Well-Known Member

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    Well, Sunday didnt start off too well, but thank the Good Lord, my goats are safe.

    I went out at 6:30 am to check for new kids and to my horror, smoke was rolling out of the goat shed. I began to rip apart the shed, calling to my goats, one came running out, but two were still inside. A stranger pulled into the drive to assist as my husband ran out of the house to help as well. My DH dashed into the shed and felt around for my alpine and pulled her out, he remained in there checking for any babies (Bless his heart : ). My other doe ran out as well.

    My girls are safe, somewhat singed (my alpine has a blister on her teat and a scorched tail), but safe. Luckily I had pulled my pygmy doe (also pregnant) into our porch. She would not have made it out alive since she is so low to the ground.

    Ok, so I have to admit, it is probably all my fault...I had a heat lamp in there so no babies would freeze. I guess the girls were tired of sleeping with the lights on, so they pulled it down even though I had thought I had it screwed on so tightly that even I couldnt get it down...I was wrong.

    I am making definate plan for next year though. NO...absolutely NO babies this early in the year. These were do to my lack of planning : (

    Well, I dont really know what to do next. I have to have warmth for the does that are due. I am terrified to use heat lamps again. I think it was God's warning to me. What other options are out there? I have been checking on them multiple times per night, but I would hate to miss a baby being born and have it freeze before I can take it into the house to dry and warm it. And no, my husband wont allow four does in the house at night ; )

    We live in SW Michigan. Temps are hanging right around zero right now. I sure could use some advice.

    Thanks,
    Cindy
     
  2. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    Do you have a basment in your house? You could bring them inside. Maybe some real heavy insulation in the new building? I happy no one was seriously hurt. Thank God.
     

  3. oldmcdonaldsfarm

    oldmcdonaldsfarm Well-Known Member

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    Oh my gosh!! How terrifying! I'm glad everyone is o-kay
    As for emergency shelter I think Sancraft's suggestion is a great one.

    I don't have a basement, but I also don't have the temps you do either. My emergency plan is my horse trailer or, if it's not here, enclosing my porch and carpot with cattle panels.
     
  4. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    i had kids the beginning of january. they are fine with no extra heat. i had a thik layer of srtaw and one circle of straw on the wall. they don't need extra heat. im in south lyon michigan, i think same temp that you have.
    susanne
     
  5. TwoAcresAndAGoat

    TwoAcresAndAGoat Well-Known Member

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    I am so glad to hear that none of your goats, your husband, the person who stopped to help and yourself were not injured.

    If you can build a small area inside you goat shed (I don't knw how bit your shed is) with straw or hay bales, big enough for the goats to get inside. Bed deep with loose straw and toss a sheet of plywood (prefered) or a heavy tarp over the top it will make an area where the goat's body heat can keep it warm. If you use plywood it doesn't need to be very tall but if you use a tarp it needs to be tall enought the goats can't jump on top of it.

    If you need to seperate the does you could (room provided of course) build a hay bale stall for each.
     
  6. No Regrets Farm

    No Regrets Farm Well-Known Member

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    Those are great ideas! I will try to build a strawbale shelter inside of their shed to keep the body heat in.

    Last saturday, we did have one doe kid and the baby died before I found it. The body was still warm and wet (maybe born about a hour before I found it). I had assumed that it was just too cold for it. We had a heat lamp on at that time, too. That's why I have been so concerned about heating in there.

    We dont have a basement : ( I sure wish we did, I would definately bring them in if I could.

    I checked my alpine's udders. Both are blistered and of course very painful to her. I put triple antibiotic ointment on them to speed healing. I sure hope she doesnt kid now, there is no way she could handle feeding a baby with being burned. Can you think of anything that would speed healing better? Would it be wise to give her an antibiotic of any kind to prevent infection?

    Thanks,
    Cindy
     
  7. TwoAcresAndAGoat

    TwoAcresAndAGoat Well-Known Member

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    A few years ago I had a 2nd degree burn on my hip about 6 x 8" Use ALOE on it, it helped the pain a lot. DO NOT DRAIN THE BLISTER

    Superficial burn will heal in about 3 days

    Soak the burn in cool water. Then treat it with a skin care product like aloe vera cream or an antibiotic ointment. To protect the burned area, you can put a dry gauze bandage over the burn.


    Superficial partial-thickness burns--usually less than 3 weeks.

    Soak the burn in cool water for 15 minutes. If the burned area is small, put cool, clean, wet cloths on the burn for a few minutes every day. Then put on an antibiotic cream or other creams or ointments prescribed by your doctor. Cover the burn with a nonstick dressing (for example, Telfa) and hold the dressing in place with gauze or tape, and give a littel prayer that the goats leave it alone. You may need to seperate her.

    Check the burn every day for signs of infection, such as increased pain, redness, swelling or pus. Change the dressing every day. First, wash your hands with soap and water. Then gently wash the burn and put antibiotic ointment on it. Make sure she is up-to-date on tetanus shots

    Keep the stall really clean to prevent infection.

    If the burns are on her udder I don't see any problem with and milking if on her teat I'm not sure what you could do. I wouldn't let the kid nurse if the burn is on the udder the kid might bump the udder and cause more pain and break open the blister.

    Good lucka and keep us posted.
     
  8. Milking Mom

    Milking Mom COTTON EYED DOES

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    Bless your heart. Sorry about the burn on her udder. Glad everyone is ok other wise though. {{HUGGSS}} :p
     
  9. JoyKelley

    JoyKelley Well-Known Member

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    I was so sorry to hear about your fire this morning and glad to hear that everyone survived. I hope you can get that udder healed up. Againvery sorry for your loss but we sure learned a lesson from it, we were thinking seriously about putting a heater in the barn tonight , the temperature is dropping and we are expecting an " artic blast" temps to drop possibly into the 20's, for us this is dangerously cold weather. last night I sewed 7 goat coats but didn't think that would be enough. I read someones advice to you to make haybale stalls and thought it was a great idea so we did today in preparation for tonight. The doe with the 6 month old doeling are snug as bugs in a rug. the doe with the four 3 1/2 month old maniacs have destroyed all the bales and are playing like they are at disney world. Hopefully they will eventually tire out and I can rebuild it again ( 4 th time ) and they will stay warm as well.

    Best wishes and prayers in your recovering quickly
     
  10. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    I have does due soon. I live in southern lower michigan. I will start checking my does, around the clock in about two weeks. we will watch thme 24 hours a day. I will bring the baby's wrapped in several blankets in the house. I won't put heaters, in the goat houses, or barn, or heat lamps. goats like to check things out to much, and they will pull on cords, and heaters. so we just check, and sleeep in between. I don't like winter babies, but have them this year. but next season. billie, is going to be locked down solid, none of this jumping the fence like he dod this year. the stinker. !!!!!!!!!!but I had one doe that also jumped over the fence, and was laying in the drive way with the buck, chewing their cuds, and one of my other does, jumped the fence, and ran on a dead run to the barn to his stall.
    she is my hussie, but her babies won't be born, until may, wich is fine with me .
     
  11. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    no regrets farm, if her teats were not burned she should be able to nurse ok. BUt if you want you can have a vet look at her, he might say to give her some pen. for a couple of days to be on the safe side. OR you can just go with what you are using. I would ask him. IF the burns aren't on her teats, it will be fine, if on the teats, I would get the vet for sure, because she will have to be milked out., twice a day. poor thing, I am so sorry for your loss. IT must be heart breaking. If you want, if you have a horse trailer, you could build a stall in that for your goats, or maybe even two, and that way you could close them in. but I would have lots of straw in it, because medal gets cold, and holds cold, just like heat.
     
  12. copperpennykids

    copperpennykids Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi there,

    I just had to respond. First of all, i am sorry to hear about your fire. You hear that those heat lamps are responsible for a lot of barn fires...Scary.

    Make a paste of comfrey, honey and vitamin E oil to put on the burns.
    Fresh comfrey is best (I chewed it to release the good stuff--felt like a cow, but it was worth it.) otherwise you can get dried comfrey at the health food store and just use enough honey and VitE oil to make a moist paste.

    My daughter burned the back of her hand badly a few months ago and didn't tell me, so only rinsed it under cold running water....Anyway, I made this paste for her (after 3 days of unsuccessful aloe, basic ointment (OTC)etc.) and wrapped it with gauze to keep the paste on the wound. The first day it was 50% better. I couldn't believe it. Each day it filled in , lost the angry redness. Healed from the outside in (At first it was as big as a 50 cent piece, by the end of the week it was a penny, and then took another week to finish up. )

    By the way, it was quite painful for her before we tried the herbal treatment, but after 2 days of it, she didn't have any pain.
    I got this remedy from Lalitha Thomas' book, Ten Essential Herbs.

    Hope this helps.
    Camille