Globe Artichoke - zone 6

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by GoatsRus, Jun 5, 2006.

  1. GoatsRus

    GoatsRus TMESIS

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    Can globe artichoke plants survive in the garden over the winter in zone 6 or do you need to dig them up and bring them in? Can you just cut them back and throw a good covering of mulch on them?
     
  2. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You have that right. Also here in zone 6 you may need to protect it from really hot sun. I didn't get mine coveredin time for the winter. Did you start yours from seed? I saw some growing at the colonial Williamsburg garden. They had willow branches over them in the wwinter that held leaves around them (kind of like a teepee) Then in the summer the willow leaves would grow and protect the artichokes from the sun.
     

  3. GoatsRus

    GoatsRus TMESIS

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    My neighbor has 12 plants growing from seed and is willing to share. I have a raised garden, and one spot gets morning sun, but a tree shades it in the afternoon. I thought that would be the best place for them. I guess I just need to make sure they're covered for the winter.
     
  4. Bret F

    Bret F Well-Known Member

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    I am also in zone 6. I planted some three years ago. They did well the first two years with a layer of leaves over them for the winter. This last year I turned the chickens into the garden after everything froze and they pretty much exposed the artichokes, added to a colder winter than we have had for a few years. Two came back this spring out of eight. I started more this year, but in the fall I will put a small fence around them to keep the chickens from pulling all of the leaves off.
     
  5. Hovey Hollow

    Hovey Hollow formerly hovey1716

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    I've read that even if though they are perinneals they only last about 3 years. I'm wanting to start some but can't find any locally. I found one packet at one store one time and they started well in pots, but they fried when it got unseasonably hot one day in April while they were hardening off. I'm going to plant them directly in the flower bed next time. I thought since they are a perrinneal that I don't really want them in the regular garden where they would be disturbed every season, so I'm going to put them in with the flowers in the front yard. They are supposed to have neat spiky grey folliage.
     
  6. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    Mine survived when I had them planted in a really dry area at a previous home.. The ones I planted where we live now don't survive....I think they rot over the winter in soil that isn't dry.
     
  7. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    They do have nice foliage. They're a thistle and have that same prickly foliage and a giant purple flower if you let them flower. Very pretty. "The artichoke capital of the world" is Castroville CA. It's cool and foggy and the sun hardly shines there all summer, mostly high 50's to low 70's; and the winters get a few light frosts and lots of rain. That's what you have to try to duplicate. Being in zone 5, I'm encouraged that you zone 6 folks have had success! Maybe I'll try them next year. BTW, being Castroville's first Artichoke Queen in 1947 is how Norma Jean Baker got her start!:p