glass front for my schrader stove

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Paul Wheaton, Dec 24, 2004.

  1. Paul Wheaton

    Paul Wheaton Well-Known Member

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    I have a standalone schrader stove. It has a metal-chain-screen-thing so you can leave the doors open and see the fire. My wife likes to use it a lot, but it makes me nervous. Some sparks still make it out and I know it is burning oxygen from the room.

    I suspect that schrader makes a lot of different wood stoves. So the glass things for them would be different for each model, right?

    How might I go about finding a glass front that would work with this?
     
  2. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    Paul, you would need to talk to the manufacturer first. Second choice would be a metalworker/machinist shop.

    But, before you do that, there are a couple of other things that need to be addressed. First, do you have an outside air source for your stove? There should be a tube leading from outdoors (screened to keep critters out, and protected from being buried in snow) to underneath your stove. If you had a fireplace the outside air source could come in at the back of the firebox. But there needs to be a source of air other than room air to feed the fire. Second, do you have a Carbon monoxide detector? We've never had one, and have survived just fine, but it would give you peace of mind. Third, do you have a fireproof hearth extending at least a foot, and preferably farther, in front of your stove? Then, beyond that you should have a pure wool rug if the floor is flammable (wool doesn't burn very well). If you do all these things, and still feel the need of glass doors, then see the first paragraph.

    Kathleen
     

  3. Paul Wheaton

    Paul Wheaton Well-Known Member

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    outside air source: yes.

    carbon monoxide detectore: nope.

    hearth: yes.
     
  4. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    For ages, woodburning served many purposes in homes, not the least of which was to ventilate bad air from the house and keep the inside of the home dry. As time went by, tight metal stoves replaced fireplaces, and homes became nearly airtight. The consequence is that many homes that use nearly air tight woodburning stoves now do not get the needed air exchange and the inside air has become a breeding site for all kinds of bad things. There is no simple answer to this dilemma, as air to air heat exchangers are a small fortune.

    I don't know for certain, but I am beginning to believe that bringing cold outside air into the firebox is not the best idea. On one hand it reduces the temperature of the fire thus decreasing the efficiency of the stove, plus it eliminates the benefit of the fire drawing stale inside air out of the house.