Give Me Dog Breed Suggestions!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by AnnaS, Nov 25, 2004.

  1. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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    I'm thinking about adding a dog to the current menagerie, & would really like the expirenced imput of this board.
    It's gonna need some special characteristics to fit in here.

    -not chase /kill chickens, goats or cats (making the chickens fly every so often would be okay, who can resist that)
    -intelligent but not Border Collie "I need a job or a straightjacket" smart
    -bark & look threatening when needed, doesn't need to be able to back it up
    -enough coat so it won't freeze here in MN, although the house/barn will be its primary residence.
    -uncommon enough so there aren't too many genetic diseases
    -any size
    I know I don't want any sled dog breeds, Dals, or Greyhounds. Love Greyhounds but don't dare have them with cats.
    I grew up with a Golden who was one of those perfect Lassie kid dogs & did obedience shows to a CDX. Also did 2 years of vet tech and humane society volunteer so I do know how to evaluate an unknown dog. I've been looking at the local shelters but like all shelters, the dogs are 99% screaming black lab crosses. What is there, a factory for these somewhere?
    So, what breed would you folks suggest?
     
  2. silosounds

    silosounds Well-Known Member

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    Do you live on a farm ? Do you need the dog for herding or just protection and affection ? We tried a german shepard and love her. As a loose eyed dog she doesnt bother the stock to much not like assies or boarder collies she can hold her own if cyotes come around loves our cats of course this is because we set her bondries for her shes good with our kids and is smart we give her extra nutriants that permote good bone formation to help the on going problem in the breed hip displasia. thats our only worry My dad trains dogs as a living and has a herding ranch where he teaches peaple and their dog how to herd cattle and sheep , duck ect... He really likes our dog says she a good one. hope this helps
    I have a link at my web page that shows his ranch and some info he possibly could help you with any further questions . have a happy holiday and blessings from terry in Ks.
     

  3. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    A well bred German shepherd is hard to beat, with some training from you added. Same is true for Goldens. Some (most) of our Springers would have fit your requirements. Oh wait a sec, my border collie wants to type something, .... standard poodles would be a good choice too. ........ Hmmm actually she's right about that!
     
  4. Ozarks_1

    Ozarks_1 Well-Known Member

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    We currently have a German Shepherd/wolf mix who is surprising good with the critters. I'll admit to having some mixed feelings about him being a half-wolf when I first got him, but he hasn't shown any unwanted wolf traits or tendencies. Although he could easily jump over the 4' field fence and get in with the goats, he doesn't bother. The ONLY time he ever bothers the chickens is when they get into his food dish. He does a good job at keeping the coyotes, bobcat, and brown bear away from the place (he will play with the bear out in the field though) - but he won't mess with the cougar when it's around.
    His "assistant" is a slightly older Blue Heeler/Border Collie + yellow lab mix who's always been pretty decent around the critters. Unfortunately, he's somewhat lacking in the intelligence department.
     
  5. momofeight

    momofeight Active Member

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    I used to breed and handle CHows, but they aren't for everyone! THE best dog to me for your purpose is a Bouvier! Great dogs!!!
     
  6. CountryGoalie

    CountryGoalie Well-Known Member

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    Might I suggest a Mudi?

    Of course, practically any dog is going to need some training here. :rolleyes: Corrections when they show too much exuberance towards livestock, and you should be pretty well on your way. :)

    From what I've heard of the Mudi, which is a herding breed, they are very intellgent but, as you said, not Border Collie "I need a job or a straightjacket" smart. There was recently a very good post on the InternationalMudiGroup on yahoogroups about the herding tendencies of the more "hyperactive" BC versus the herding style of the Mudi, etc. If you'll send me a private message with your email, I can forward it to you.

    This is the only part I'm not sure if they'd fit in. They aren't the largest breed in the world, but, then again, practically any breed can bark and look threatening when intruders come onto the property. I have an 18-pound Schipperke whose bark sounds more threatening than the barking of most of our 80-to-105 lb. Kuvasz, and though he may be small, I can't think of a person who'd want to meet with his teeth. :eek:

    I do believe they'd be hairy enough. ;)

    The only problem you might have is that they aren't quite common enough. Of course, you'd want to locate a breeder who screens for hip problems, etc, as that is a problem in almost ANY breed. However, I don't believe that they've got any big genetic problems.

    Fifteen to nineteen inches at the shoulders. Females range from 18-26 pounds, males range 24-33 pounds.



    You can find out more about them at http://www.geocities.com/americanmudiassociation ....

    Also, there is this breeder: http://www.geocities.com/the_mudi_kennel/title.html
    They are located in Hungary but they are the president of the American club and I believe they visit often. They have nice stock.

    Also, if you are interested in getting more information on the Mudis, I highly recommend joining the InternationalMudiGroup on Yahoogroup.
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/InternationalMudiGroup/


    Well, I hope all of this information helps.
     
  7. moldy

    moldy Well-Known Member

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    I would second the chows, but they will need training to keep away from teh chickens. You also need to be aware they are VERY protective of "their" family. Overall, though, they are wonderful dogs if treated well. I only get mine as puppies (older dogs can have too many bad habits or have had too many bad experiences). They are not difficult to train (in my experience).
     
  8. second_noah

    second_noah Local Yokel

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    What about a LGD? Great Pyranese don't have to be 'straight' LGD's, they make lovely family dogs as well, but with the added instinct of an LGD. Get em as a pup and let them grow up around you and your animals. Plenty of fur and are natural guardians. Their size alone can be intimidating to strangers.

    Newfoundlands are nice. May be worth your time checking into as well.

    I'm not a chow fan. Been snapped at too many times in my years as a vet tech. I wouldn't trust em around my animals either.

    GSD's may have TOO much of a prey drive for your taste. Probably so with any retriving breed as well, like the Goldens. It would take a good bit of training to acclimate them to your birds.

    I like the suggestion of a standard poodle that someone else posted as well. They are awesome dogs and make great family pets. Very smart.
     
  9. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Check into the Kuvasz breed. It's a livestock protection guardian. Raised from a pup to get used to your stock and familiarize the boundaries of your property, it's a nice breed. Big...big feet..beautiful gate...hardy...withstands winter well, but sheds.... no offending natural odor from the dog....loyal....imposing to strangers, but can stand it's ground when threatened. A beautiful white dog.
    A pyrenese also would be one to consider.
    I had a Kuvasz, but the pyrenese I've encountered were lovely homestead dogs too.
     
  10. CountryGoalie

    CountryGoalie Well-Known Member

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    As with any LGD, though, you need to make sure that you socialize - a lot. I know of too many kuvasz who are ruined by unknowledgeable or lazy owners.

    By the way, moonwolf... you owned a kuvasz? Do you remember who the breeder was? My mother and I used to raise and show Kuvasz. We no longer breed, and only occasionally show, and now we are surrounded by "retirement dogs". In fact, my female dog, CH. Mission's Come Fly With Me, "Angel", is lying about six feet away on the living room floor, watching Thanksgiving preparations.
     
  11. Rouen

    Rouen Well-Known Member

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    anatolians! they wont let anyone they dont know into the yard, they usually wont bite but they block and look mean unless they are provoked then all heck will break loose, they do have a few health problems but they dont seem like they are all that common;

    "Some are prone to eyelid entropion or to hypothyroidism. Hip dysplasia does occur, but is not as common as some other large breeds. They are sensitive to anesthesia. The Anatolian Shepherd's immunity often takes longer to develop than with many other breeds and therefore young Anatolians should be given extra vaccinations against parvo-virus."

    pyrs seem a little more prone to theirs;

    "Prone to hip dysplasia. Can develop skin problems in very hot weather."

    Kuvasz;

    "Prone to hip dysplasia, (check with your breeder to make sure the parents have hip clearance). Some minor issues are osteochondritis dissecans (a disease causing lameness from inflammation of the shoulder joints), hypertrophic osteodystrophy, skin problems and allergic reactions"

    GSD;

    "hip and elbow dysplasia, (be sure both parents have had their hips certified at least OFA good) blood disorders, digestive problems (probably due to nerves), epilepsy, chronic eczema, keratitis (inflammation of the cornea), dwarfism and flea allergies."

    any dog you get will need training, and with proper training any dog can fit the bill, with improper training any dog can also kill your chickens in less than an hour, LGDs would probly work better since they were bred to live with stock.

    how about a bouvier? they're a generally healthy breed, but they do tend to be a little hyper in the puppy years, and maybe a little beyond them.
    or maybe a Beauceron?

    Happy turkey day!
     
  12. cloverfarm

    cloverfarm Well-Known Member

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    Standard poodles? Seriously? Are they weather proof?

    We recently lost our BC :waa:

    Ann
     
  13. Xandras_Zoo

    Xandras_Zoo Well-Known Member

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    The breed I really liked was the Norweigion Buhund. They're about 18 inches at the shoulder, have a coat, groom themselves like a cat, are a herding dog, but don't have the hyperactivity, are good with other pets, are very smart, very loveable. They also have a very low incidence of genetic diseases.
     
  14. SaS58

    SaS58 Well-Known Member

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    I would recommend the Great Pyr's. We have two and they are great dogs. We raised them from pup's around our cattle, poultry, cats etc and we've never had a problem with the dogs bothering them, or any problems with other predator's bothering anything. One of the dogs especially thinks it's her main job to guard the chicken house and we've not had any predator losses since we've had the dogs. They are very sweet and gentle with everyone, especially the children that come to visit.
     
  15. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    My Kuvasz was from Thunderbell Kennel breeding. They no longer are around, but the old guy was quite conscientious about the breed health and showing.
    The other kennel now in Canada is Brantwood under the stewardship of Olga Schmidt. Probably some of the best Kuvasz breeding anywhere.
    Sonja was HD clear and had lovely facial features. That's another characteristic of the breed, as I'm sure you know. Man, they are handsome pups. I have a picture of her about 4 months 'fuzzy' in the snow. She lived also with a group of Westies which I now have. What a riot! :haha:
     
  16. momofeight

    momofeight Active Member

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    I feel so bad when people say ugly things about Chows. I have had Chows that nursed kittens...it depends on where you get them from. Stick with an old kennel like Charmar. But again, my last Chow hated men. We were at a dog show and hundreds of women had come up to him and played with him, lots of kids as well...but the first guy who ame up to him, he almost took his hand off. It is the owner's responsiblility to tell you if the dog has a strong dislike..not the Chows fault. You as a vet should know better.
     
  17. Rouen

    Rouen Well-Known Member

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    Xandras_Zoo said; "The breed I really liked was the Norweigion Buhund. They're about 18 inches at the shoulder, have a coat, groom themselves like a cat, are a herding dog, but don't have the hyperactivity, are good with other pets, are very smart, very loveable. They also have a very low incidence of genetic diseases."

    Norwegian Buhund;
    "The buhund coat should be brushed regularly and needs extra care during shedding season. This breed is a seasonal heavy shedder.
    This is a very active breed that needs to be exercised every day, eye and hip problems can occur in this breed."


    how about a Rafeiro do Alentejo, only health issue with them is hip displaysia and it's not common, big dogs(Males 110-132 pounds Females 100-121 pounds), a little grooming during shed, and who wouldn't be intimidated by a dog that size.
     
  18. MaKettle

    MaKettle Well-Known Member

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    When chit-chatting with the local animal control officer, she stated that the two breeds she most cautious with because of tendancy to bite were chows and (are you ready?) cockers. The cost of a registered dog is horrendous in this area. Almost, but not always equal to the price of mongrels with cute titles such as labra-poos.

    Would recommend going to library and reviewing their stash of Dog Fancy for pictures and descriptions of dogs. There is petfinder.com once you have some idea of what you want. Our lovely Springer Spaniels were terrific all around dogs. Would bark, would greet UPS guy with waggy tail, would offer to remove the arm any stranger reaching into the car when the kids were in there, were highly intelligent and easily trained. They, of course, do not make good sheep dogs.

    All dogs in the subsequent years have been rescue mutts. A Dalmation mix (nutty, wierd, loveable, and untrustworthy around anyone she did not know well), golden-collie mix, golden-? mix, a pit bull mix, and now the little chow-beagle-golden-? mix. None of these herd sheep. None of them bothered the animals. All of them delighted in people--except the dalmation mix. All of them loved to cuddle, ride in the car, and bark at strangers. All of them could be relied on to defend home and humans if need be.
    So, if you just want a pet, keep checking the shelter. Also the paper. Esp after Christmas when the Christmas puppies begin to demonstrate chewing. jAnd enroll in a local dog obedience class to socialize the dog.
     
  19. AnneM

    AnneM New Member

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    We have a German Shepard - she's great! smart but doesn't need constant attention. She gets along with our cats. She has a herding instinct, but is very obedient and responsive.
     
  20. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    Wow! I'm really amazed that no one has mentioned farm collies!! Go to http://www.geocities.com/farmcollie1/assn.html and read up about them. They aren't border collies. Many are purebred or part English Shepherd; some are part Collie; a few are Aussie, or part Aussie and I think one or two are part BC. It's not a conformation registry, it's a working registry. So any working dog of collie ancestry that meets the qualifications can be registered with them. There is also a Yahoo group at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/AWFA/?yguid=109437082 and I know there are several litters either on the way or planned. Most of the breeders don't charge an arm and a leg, as they are breeding specifically for small farmers and homesteaders and are well aware that most of us aren't rich. I have a male farm collie - he's 3/4 English Shepherd and 1/4 Collie, and a wonderful dog. I've had him four years, and he's never shown the slightest interest in chasing the chickens or bothering the goats. Sometimes I've had him living with the goats as a LGD, and he does fine with them. He's very smart, very loving, great with small children (our oldest daughter and her family, including three toddlers, lived with us for a while), generally a good dog. He does like to chase bikes, most herding breeds do. Anyway, look into them.

    Kathleen