ginseng,apples

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by sue currin, Aug 28, 2004.

  1. sue currin

    sue currin Well-Known Member

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    maine
    i just moved to maine from the mountians of NC, and i want to know if shang grows here, and i also have about 60 apple trees on this place, that the folks around here can only tell me what 2 of them are, thank you sue
     
  2. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    I can't help you with the ginseng at all.

    Some apple reference books I use for identification are "Apples" by Roger Yepsin, and "A Somerset Pomona" by Liz Copas. You might see if your library has them available at all. Also, your county Ag Extension office or nearest college Ag department should be able to put you in touch with someone familiar with old apple varieties in your area.

    Come to think of it, one of the apple nurseries I deal with is in Maine - Fedco. I've found them to be really helpful, you might see if they can help you out with identification. http://fedcoseeds.com/trees.htm is their web address.
     

  3. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

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    People are very private about ginseng. For good info go to the A-SPI site (from Kentucky) and visit their ginseng group. I've taken their classes offered in my state.

    The Appalachian Ginseng Foundation is part of Appalachia-Science in the Public Interest-there is even a growers manual online:

    http://www.a-spi.org/AGF/index.htm
     
  4. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    There's plenty of "sang" in NC, but as said before; you're not going to get someone to point out the good spots. Just look for north slopes, Black Walnut trees, and grape vines to get you started.

    If you've got the eye for it you can almost quit your day job. Wild sang is bringing $250-300 a pound.
     
  5. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    There is wild ginseng and domestic ginseng. Wild ginseng is just that.....wild! The high price of wild ginseng reflects supply & demand. It is very, very difficult to find in abundance. Don't quit your day job after finding your first wild ginseng plant.
    In this area, it grows in hardwood stands and seems to like areas with oak trees. I have seen wild ginseng in the woods but never harvested it.

    The heart of the domestic ginseng industry is Wausau, WI, http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/afcm/ginseng.html about 90 miles from here. I know a lot of people that were going to make there fortune raising the plant......which takes 5 to 7 years before it can be harvested.....but none of them raised a crop to harvest. Growing domestic ginseng is extremely labor intensive and growing conditions must be ideal!

    Incidentally, the price for domestically grown ginseng has dropped significantly in the last few years.
     
  6. sue currin

    sue currin Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    thanks everybody, i was looking for parts of the state that it might grow in maine, i would not show my spots to any body even when i left NC never know when you might get to go back and hunt it again. i'll get the apple book jen you folks are very nice. i am an organic farmer so if i can help you out just let me know. sue