Getting the Windows to 2nd Story...

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Mawna, Jun 30, 2005.

  1. Mawna

    Mawna Well-Known Member

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    We need some ideas please. We have just recently been able to purchase windows for our place. The ones that are worrying me are the 6'by4' ones we have to install in the second story. It's just me and the hubby to accomplish this so if anyone has any good tips on what to do or Not to do, we sure would appreciate it. Scaffling is kind-a out due to the ground below is so badly sloped, and if it slips we have a long way to roll to the bottom of the mountain. Not to mention I can't afford to replace the windows again.

    Appreciate any advice!!!
     
  2. Siryet

    Siryet In Remembrance

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    Throw a rope over the roof and pull the windows up and secure the rope when the windows are at the place they need to be to be installed. You can use a truck to pull the rope.

    Be careful and work slowly. once the window is at the necessary spot put the bottom on the framing and remove the rope and push the window into place.

    DISCLAIMER: I HAVE NEVER TRIED THIS BUT I AM GOING TO WHEN I REPLACE THE WINDOWS ON OUR SECOND FLOOR, SO TAKE THIS ADVICE FOR WHAT IT IS.
     

  3. Mawna

    Mawna Well-Known Member

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    welp that's kinda what I had in mind. But after reading this I walked out and took a look. MAN Alive are we gonna need several loooong ropes!!! We built it with a two level roof. The roof to the lofts and then the roof to the kitchen/dining area. I am so nervous about this task as I had to save long and hard just to get these windows. I'm sure you understand. I really appreciate your advice, I'm just gonna have to study on that idea alittle harder I reckon.
     
  4. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    Nancy and a builder, who was going to help me, told me to get scaffolding, when I wanted to put up a chimney. "No way," I said. Of course, because the builder would not come unless I put it up, and Nancy said if I want a new chimney, then get the builder's help, I then put up the scaffolding.

    Best thing I ever did, hardly cost me anything, did it myself. You can level out the bottom, no matter what. I say do it right and don't get hurt -- what good is that?

    Enjoy your new windows and be safe,

    Alex
     
  5. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Any rental shops near buy. I rented a towable cherry picker and use it. I wasm able to use it on slopped yard.
     
  6. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    We have allways installed windows from the inside, carry them up the stairs, insert them through the rough opening diagionally and with enought hands present simply put them in place while reaching through the hole. Use a ladder or whatever to add the trim or paint, ect.
     
  7. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    If inside will work, sure, good idea. Last one I put in was the french door from our second floor to our back deck, so no problems. I worked out on the deck. I could have done it from inside, now that I think about it.

    You're right, moo.

    Alex
     
  8. ed/IL

    ed/IL Well-Known Member

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    Do your 1st floor windows first. Do the smaller 2nd floor windows next. Your skill level will improve with every window. Might need an extra hand or two for the large windows.
     
  9. Wildcrofthollow

    Wildcrofthollow Well-Known Member

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    Block and Tackle.

    I lifted a picture window to the second floor with 2 blocks on one side and 2 blocks on the other. the window was 10' x 6'. It was big and heavy and unwieldy. Other than that the method was pretty much the one described by Siryet.

    With all due respect, I would not use a truck to lift. By using the blocks and ropes the windows can be lifted easily even by someone who is not very strong. With a truck one person (the driver) is really trying to do a fairly precision job without using a very precision tool. Angle of pull is compromised by only being able to pull horizontally across the ground. The blocks allow slow, safe, easily adjustable force. Angle of force is easy to adjust etc. The older methods of doing things like this are often more adaptable to varying circumstances.

    I would also heartily agree with alex. Scaffolding can be leveled on any terrain and would be by far the safest for you and your windows.

    Both Scaffolding and Block and tackle can be rented. If you put up the scaffold yourself (pretty easy to do) You will find it to be far more inexpensive than a broken window

    If you don't have time to do it right the first time, will you have time to do it right the second?

    David
     
  10. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    I recently installed windows in the back wall of my second story loft and we are also on a steeply sloped site. Now this may sound a bit nuts but it did work for me...do to the slope when we put up the ladder we had to bolt the top of the ladder to the house to keep it from sliding off the hill. we did this by inserting two large eye bolts into the siding and into a stud and then tied the ladder to the eyebolt using reg cotton rope. then we carried the window up stairs on the inside of the house. one of us went out and got on the ladder (wear knee pads so you can brace yourself without pain!) and the other stayed inside. together we picked up the window, tilted it and rested it in the window opening. once we rested and thought a bit we took out one half of the sliding window (boy did that make it lighter and the job so much easier!) then we brought the window (with the half out) to the outside and placed it on the top of the ladder, after which we gingerly placed the bottom of the window into the frame and then moved the top into place. this works with the person on the inside holding the window against the window opening while the guy on the ladder is able to place a few screws/nails to hold the window in place. then some leveling and plumming and the darn window was in and working great! do be careful, you may want to tie yourself to the house or the ladder like linemen do so you cant fall off backward! sis oops almost forgot out windows were 4x6 and double glazed too.
     
  11. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When I've watched them being installed, the builders almost always did it from the inside. Usually had the windows opened and centered, so they could grasp the casing well top and bottom.
     
  12. Mawna

    Mawna Well-Known Member

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    I just want to tell you all I am reading each and every post and picking advice up here and there and sharing it with Hubby.

    hahaha I know we have done alot of things backwards. But neither of us had ever built a cabin or house from scratch by our own selfs. All of it is out of our heads and built as we go. So we have more than likely missed an idea or two along the way that will have to be corrected. ONE being we haven't built the stairs yet! Awh I know, I know kinda dumb! But we are having a time figuring out just where to stick them. The stair incline vs footage vs head clearance is giving us fits now.

    And I can not stress the SLOPE to the land enough. To level much of it we would have to level the entire mountain side off. The slope IS the western downhill side of the MOUNTAIN. BUT yet just around the house is not SO bad just very dangerous.

    But I am feeling better reading how you folks figured out how to put in second story windows. I don't feel so alone in the task we have to take on. Thanks you all!