Getting roses ready for winter????

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Mandy, Oct 7, 2004.

  1. Mandy

    Mandy Well-Known Member

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    I have two rose bushes one is a hybrid tea the other just a regular hybrid rose, my question is I have read so many different things on how to get them ready for the winter; that now I am not sure what is the right thing to do. :waa:

    I live in NH, so winters can be very rough, do I cut them back? I was going to mulch aroung them but then I read not to because it can create too much warmth. So do I mulch around them? Should I cover them with something?

    These are my first roses and the grew absolutly beautiful, I had dozens of blooms and would have continued to get more but we got frost the other night. If any one could help it would be greatly appreciated. I am so confused by all the different thngs I've read I just don't know what to do.

    TIA
    Mandy
     
  2. Mickey

    Mickey Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi Mandy,
    I'm up in the Lakes Region of NH and have grown Austin roses for many years now and this is how I prepare them for winter. Just before the ground freezes I clean up all dead leaves and dispose of them, then stick several stakes in the ground around each plant. After the ground is frozen I mound up the base of each plant with compost, or soil if you don't have compost. I don't do any pruning in the fall, but wait until spring to see if there was any winter die back.
    Here in the north you should have planted your roses with the graft union about 2 inches BELOW the surface of the soil.
    We really are at the edge of the hardiness zone for many kinds of roses here, including the Austins, but I haven't lost one yet, although I do have them planted in a very sheltered area of my yard.
    For a more "carefree" variety of roses I can suggest any of the Explorer Series of roses, or any of the rugosas. I have John Cabot, Terese Bugnet, Champlain and William Baffin from the Explorer series and several rugosas and they don't require any special treatment to prepare them for winter. I just tell them "goodnight, see you in the spring" and that's it. And they are planted in my back gardens where they are exposed to all the harsh winter winds. Anyway, this is probably more information than you wanted, but I hope it helps.
    Mickey
     

  3. Mandy

    Mandy Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Mickey,

    I had planned on doing just as you discribed. From what I had read I decided that was the best thing to do, however your post confirmed that it was! :D I love the rugosas, my MIL has them and they do very well for her, I will probably plant those next year. My current roses are in a very exposed area, so I dont know if I should offer some sort of protection.

    Once again thanks for your advise, and it sounds like you have wonderful gardens. Keep up that hard work! ;)
     
  4. Mickey

    Mickey Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would give that tea rose some extra protection for sure if it's really exposed to alot of wind Mandy. You could try one of those rose cones or wrap around the stakes with twine and fill the whole thing in with leaves or straw. Martha Stewart wraps her rose beds with burlap. What part of the state are you in?
    Mickey
     
  5. Mandy

    Mandy Well-Known Member

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    I am in the Concord area. I think I will try staking it and filling in with leaves. That sounds like a good plan. :D Thanks again for your help and suggestions.
     
  6. Mickey

    Mickey Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm up on the Sanbornton line. Good luck with your roses!
    Mickey
     
  7. treeguy

    treeguy Active Member

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    no mulch and no straw.
    put a metal ring around them and fill it with oak leaves because they won't flatten out and get wet. oak leaves will stay dry and will maintain loftstraw and mulch tend to encourage mice and voles, and could rot them if they get wet. just prune them enough to get them covered and then in spring prune them after the buds begin to swell but before they open