Getting Fainting Goats

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Farmgirl2005, Mar 23, 2005.

  1. Farmgirl2005

    Farmgirl2005 Well-Known Member

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    I am so excited i maybe getting to wether fainting goats i can not wait. They are tricolored and 5 weeks old, they will be taken home when they are 8 weeks or so. Does anyone have anyadvice about this breed. Just want to make sure they wont do anythin i am unprepared for. I have done research and now what their name imples, one of the reasons i am buying them. They will have sisters soon 2 alpine girls. I hope they wont fight eachother to the bone i know there will be some dominate problems in the beginning. Thanks for any advice.
    Thanks Lyn
     
  2. kath2003

    kath2003 Well-Known Member

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    Hi Lyn,
    We breed Fainters here in New York.They are wonderful pets! They don't try to escape,or climb like alot of other breeds.The first time you see them go down you are going to think they are hurt.Some stay down for what seems like a very long time.Sometimes they look at you like,well,help me up!! LOL.They are very friendly and love attention.You will love them.Good Luck!! Have fun with them,

    Kathy






     

  3. Gary

    Gary Member

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    I have 19 purebred fainter does I'm using in my meat goat crossbreeding. They
    are heavy and meaty but slow growing. You never know whether they will actually 'faint' or not some will just get real stiff. Interestingly I have a buck that is 1/2 Boer 3/8Kiko and 1/8 Fainter that falls over and 'faints' at just about anything. The more they faint the better the goat is considered in some circles.
    These I have do have some interesting colors and patterns.
     
  4. Farmgirl2005

    Farmgirl2005 Well-Known Member

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    I am purchasing three boys, and am debating on whethering them or not, but they are wonderfully colored, all three are tri-colored and i love all three. They are not bottle babies and are still alittle skidish around poeple, but snce you have someif i do wether them will they loss their spunk, and if i dont will they try to seriously hurt one another when they come into rut. And one last question if i keep them intact bucks will they still be as lovey as a wether i meet, or is it better just to all around wether them, they are just pets so. Any advice and infomation would be greatly appericated.
    Thanks Lyn
     
  5. Farmgirl2005

    Farmgirl2005 Well-Known Member

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    Well my question on wethering them has been solved, the lady i am buying them from has decided that she will do it for me i am so excited i cant wait to bring these guys home. One more question on dehorning them how can this be done, two of them have little buds already is it to late they are olny about a .5 an inch long. Any information will help greatly
    THanks Lyn
     
  6. kath2003

    kath2003 Well-Known Member

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    Hi Lyn,
    Fainting bucks are so much nicer if they stay in tact,and keep their horns.When you wether a buck they loose the masculine look of them.They don't get a beard,or its very tiny,then when you take away the horns they look so girly,they really look silly! Thats just my experience and my opinion.You could look at different pictures before you decide.Fainter bucks that grow up together very seldom will fight with each other.Good luck with them,they are great!
     
  7. Farmgirl2005

    Farmgirl2005 Well-Known Member

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    NOw i am so confused do it or dont, i had a women that i know who has goats, she had two fainting bucks grow up together and the bigger ended up killing the younger one, and i had more poeple tell me i should just so i wont have to worry about the rut, I dont know what to do, now if i was to let me keep there horns but fix them will that be okay, i dont think they look to silly, wihtout their beards, but my mom is going to have to deal with them and work with them while i go to college also in a couple years. So please help with this decision, thanks so much for everything so far.
    Thanks so much i would appericate any help
    Lyn
     
  8. Xandras_Zoo

    Xandras_Zoo Well-Known Member

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    I would keep the horns, but not the gizmos. Check out this site-
    http://fiascofarm.com/goats/buck-wether-info.htm#qa

    From the website http://www.highuintapackgoats.com

    "Do I want Horns on my goats?
    This is a hot issue and ultimately comes downs to personal preference. We chose to have horns on our goats. We like the look of horned goats. We live in semi arid conditions where the horns DO help disperse heat. And we are rural enough the roaming domestic dogs are a problem. Most have learned to respect our boys ability to defend their turf. On the converse side, we have had bruised ribs, torn shirts and one split lip from dealing with horned packers (totally accidental on the goat's part). And we still want horns. But all of our family and their friends that visit know that grabbing the horns is a total no no as this single action encourages them to butt people.
    Horns vs No Horns Horns on a pack goat function as a cooling system - they each have a large blood vessel running through them. This allows the animal to cool itself as the blood circulates through the horn. The heat dissipates to the surface of the horn. Horns are also good for protection against dogs and predators. If a goat is bottle raised (and no one played with its horns), it should not drop its horns to people. For people that have shown dairy goats, the 4H and the American Dairy Goat Association rules are "no horned animals". This is for safety simply because many people do not hand raise their goats, and some breeds of goats tend to be more aggressive than others. If one chooses not to keep the horns, the best time to disbud (destroy the horn buds) is when the goat kid is ten days to two weeks of age. Our experience indicates that disbudding is best done with the use of a hot iron, as pastes and castrator bands do not work well with goats. Whichever you chose, be consistent. Do not mix horned and no horns in the same herd."

    And here are some gorgeous wethers. http://www.highuintapackgoats.com/string.html
     
  9. Farmgirl2005

    Farmgirl2005 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks a bunch that really helped, i really appericate everyone who posted information fo me to read.
    Thanks Again Lyn
     
  10. Gary

    Gary Member

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    I'd keep the horns and not castrate fainters bucks fight less than any goat