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Discussion Starter #1
i posted about 2 weeks ago i was getting goats, well their here.. mama Bluebell and a little doeling Hazel.

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its mamas first freshening, so the milking stand is a little scary for her .. i lift her up onto it myself, and then get her to put her head in the holder by pouring some pellets and such in the feeder attached to the front... holds nice and still while eating,but as soon as shes got that thing empty , which is pretty quick honestly. im not even half way done milking her out. (also fighting the baby over a teat since she knows mama is stuck there and cant push her away... gotta get a large dog crate to put her in while im milking.)

when she finishes that grain she will try to tug her head out of the hole which she cant. but she tugs so hard its got to be hurting her to try to get out... also she found out today , if she bobs her head up and down she can unlatch the hook off the top and get out (going to switch hook for a latch when i can. i dont want her to spike herself with the hook , its just all i had at the moment.)

is there a way i can get her to calm down so she dont hurt herself ? or will she calm down in time? add more food to the feeder? i tell her before we begin milking "be easy on me, im new at this too."
 

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Congratulations on getting your first milk! I've found that by putting a couple of large-ish rocks in the feeder, it may slow down the grain-gobbling. As soon as she realizes she gets FOOD up on the milkstand, she should soon jump up willingly. Yes, put the baby in a crate or something; you'll only have the mama to deal with then. First fresheners are nearly always a rodeo event - even for those of us with experience! My best advice is to keep at it, and don't let her be the boss. She'll eventually settle into your routine.

Do try to end each session on a positive note. Good luck, and keep at it!

In the past, for some especially difficult mamas, I've rigged up extra tie-downs to keep her from kicking over the milk bucket, and to keep her from unlatching the headgate.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Congratulations on getting your first milk! I've found that by putting a couple of large-ish rocks in the feeder, it may slow down the grain-gobbling. As soon as she realizes she gets FOOD up on the milkstand, she should soon jump up willingly. Yes, put the baby in a crate or something; you'll only have the mama to deal with then. First fresheners are nearly always a rodeo event - even for those of us with experience! My best advice is to keep at it, and don't let her be the boss. She'll eventually settle into your routine.

Do try to end each session on a positive note. Good luck, and keep at it!

In the past, for some especially difficult mamas, I've rigged up extra tie-downs to keep her from kicking over the milk bucket, and to keep her from unlatching the headgate.

i have yet to collect any milk .. ive only had her for 3 days ,so milked 6 times, and each time , she either puts her foot in the bucket , knocks it over , or the baby plops a foot in reaching for a teat... chickens been enjoying the little milk treat twice a day though. lol im taking my time learning the best position to milk from , and so far i found, milking from the rear is the easiest on both of us .. that way i can place my cheek on her rear, and hand under her. that way if she does try to pull away from the food dish she has me stopping her behind her so i have a extra second to save that milk , but alas ... plop. lol ill get quicker, gotta strengthen those hand muscles.

ill try that rock thing out, i give her probably about a cup of the food, im not quite sure how much i CAN give her so i was being careful.

i always end the milking on a good note , unlatch the head gate, give her some rub downs telling her thanks for bearing with me , and a treat. then more rubs when shes off the stand ,ill go back to the house to wash out the bucket, and give her a few minutes. walk back out and give her a few more rubs , so she knows not every time i come out to see her will mean im going to lock her in the stand. ill be so excited when she gets up there by herself. doing a deadlift first thing in the morning is one way to wake yourself up . lol
 

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Oh, Noes! The dreaded "Foot In Milk" disease! Seems to me you're going about this the right way. It should soon go a lot smoother for both you and mama.

Oh, and you can give her more than a cup. Maybe add in alfalfa pellets so her feeder is not all grain.
 

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Nehimama is spot on. Take the kid out of the equation. Having her there while you milk creates trouble for everyone.

Gradually increase her feed on the milk stand with alfalfa pellets or even chopped hay.

If you can milk with one hand into a jar held with the other hand, you can move it when the foot action gets out of control.

Hang in there!
 
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I would also start conditioning Hazel if you plan on milking her in the future by rubbing her underside. It gets her used to the process and won't kick as much and I've even had some that don't kick at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I would also start conditioning Hazel if you plan on milking her in the future by rubbing her underside. It gets her used to the process and won't kick as much and I've even had some that don't kick at all.

ill start doing that, shes finally use to me so i can pick her up and cuddle her once and a while. the lady i got her off of , never handled the kids, so when she first came here , she was a wild little thing. but when i do catch her and hold her , she always just snuggles into me within a few seconds of realizing "oh this aint bad." not kicking at all would be amazing, guess we will see in about a year in a half/ 2 years how the handling changes the milk stand situation for her.
 

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It won’t take that long. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
i was able to save some milk today ! a little less then a cup, but i got some! and i didnt have to deadlift this morning either ! i called my mom to ask if she had a large dog crate or something, sadly no , so next day im off work or have time after work , i can go and get one, but she came down and held Hazel while i milked. and when my hand couldnt milk anymore, i told her to let the baby latch to get the rest out. cover the one teat with my hand so she would get at the one i couldnt finish, she favors one side, so i figured if i did that then i can slowly train her to nurse from both.

heres a question , i could probably google it , but how long does fresh goat milk last in the fridge ? i know some people strain then just set it in the fridge, then some people dunk the jar in a ice bath to get it to 40 degrees as fast as possible then put it in the fridge ?
 

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Store low in fridge, toward the back. Coldest spot.

I did the ice bucket thing for years. No significant difference in shelf life.

Close to a week of freshness. :)

I usually made cheese before that.

Tell your family NOT TO SHAKE THE MILK.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Store low in fridge, toward the back. Coldest spot.

I did the ice bucket thing for years. No significant difference in shelf life.

Close to a week of freshness. :)

I usually made cheese before that.

Tell your family NOT TO SHAKE THE MILK.

what happens if you shake the milk !? my mom sloshed it around a little to see how thick the cream was. lol
 

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The way it was explained to me:

Goat milk has proteins and fatty acids that are easily broken by vibration. It releases a bitter taste to shake it.

That's why Meyenburg goat milk tastes nasty. To much vibration in processing and transportation.
 
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The way it was explained to me:

Goat milk has proteins and fatty acids that are easily broken by vibration. It releases a bitter taste to shake it.

That's why Meyenburg goat milk tastes nasty. To much vibration in processing and transportation.

huh, interesting , now i kinda wanna try a taste test , shook vs non.. see if there is a difference. good to know though , cause i always thought you where suppose to shake raw milk to mix the fat/cream back into the milk
 

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Try the store bought goat milk.
 
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The way it was explained to me:

Goat milk has proteins and fatty acids that are easily broken by vibration. It releases a bitter taste to shake it.

That's why Meyenburg goat milk tastes nasty. To much vibration in processing and transportation.
I always shake my milk pouring to reincorporate the cream into the rest of the milk. It doesn’t make it taste nasty or bitter.
 

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Understand.

Here, the stores have Meyenburg goat milk on the shelves with the cow factory milk. It is pasteurized and homogenized. And nasty.

I miss my dairy goats.
 

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the only store bought goat milk in my area they sell is the powder kind.. and its for bottle fed goats. sale of raw milk in my state is illegal , and thats what i want , the raw, straight from the animal milk. no additives. :)
It's illegal here to but sometimes it you look in the local classifieds you can find someone who will post it for animal use only. . .
 

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TX changed its laws a few years ago and I just found out. We can sell our raw goat milk now. The rules are strict, though. We can only sale directly to the buyer ON OUR FARM. We cannot deliver it or meet the buyer somewhere, or sell it for resale, or sell it at a market. The buyer must come to the farm where the milk is produced to buy.
 

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Wow! Do you have a link for the new regulations?
 
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