George Washington Carver - this is great!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by whiterock, Jun 24, 2004.

  1. whiterock

    whiterock Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I didn't know where to put this. It is history, gardeening/farming, and recipes all rolled into one.

    GREAT STUFF!!

    In my search for veg. varieties that my ancestors might have grown I contacted Texas A&M. The reply listed two sites that ya"ll have got to look at.


    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/plantanswers/recipes/carvertomato.html


    and


    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.du/plantanswers/recipes/sweetpotatoes.html


    These are bulletins written by Dr. Carver. They talk about growing, storing and using these crops.
     
  2. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have to admit that he was a brillant man, He took the mystery out of the complicated facts and rewrote them into simple terms the folks of his day could understand.and he rose above his peers ,of the time.I think that he has/had a great impact on the american agriculture.
     

  3. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member

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    His work at Tuskeegee helped our state to diversify from cotton into other crops in addition to developing bollweivel resistant strains of cotton.
     
  4. Fla Gal

    Fla Gal Bunny Poo Monger Supporter

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    It's very seldom I'm interested in googling for information on anyone but during Black History Month I saw some information on George Washington Carver and wanted to learn more. What an amazing man he was. He contributed so much to mankind.

    From About.com, 2 excerpts from this article.

    By Mary Bellis

    It is rare to find a man of the caliber of George Washington Carver. A man who would decline an invitation to work for a salary of more than $100,000 a year (almost a million today) to continue his research on behalf of his countrymen.

    At Tuskegee, Carver developed his crop rotation method, which revolutionized southern agriculture.
    http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa041897.htm
     
  5. Bob in WI

    Bob in WI Well-Known Member

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    He was certainly one sharp cookie, way ahead of his time.
     
  6. Fla Gal

    Fla Gal Bunny Poo Monger Supporter

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    I agree with you Bob on Dr. Carver being one sharp cookie.

    He was right up there with Thomas Alva Edison but decided to give the labors of his love of research to all rather than patent it. What a remarkable, loving and giving man he was.

    I believe many people haven't heard of George Washington Carver because he didn't patent all of his creations and inventions. This man was blessed and blessed us with his vast knowledge and the desire to share knowledge. Thank you Dr. Carver. :worship:
     
  7. Bob in WI

    Bob in WI Well-Known Member

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    .


    Unfortunately in todays public schools things such as this are not taught like they used to be. Now they have to teach the politically correct stuff. :no:
     
  8. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member

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    It is taught in Alabama history.
     
  9. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    I love tomatoes and have remarked that I could live on them. After reading all of those recipes I think one could. Thanks for giving us that great site.

    Did you know that George Washington Carver was a homesteader? Indeed he was.
    He homesteaded land near Beeler, Kansas which is but a tiny dot on the map today.
    Only shown on many maps since it designates the George Washington Carver monument nearby.

    http://www.lasr.net/leisure/kansas/ness/attB.html