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We recently got this generator primarily to run fridges during power outages. For now, we will be running it direct to fridges with 20a cords, eventually I might put in a transfer switch at our panel.

I don't have a lot of experience with generators, but the ones I have used have had a switch to tell the gen to supply 120 or 240v. This one has a 120/240v 30a outlet, but there is no switch, fuse, or breaker for the outlet. The instructions have frighteningly little info on running 240 from it. It does mention to use a special cord from the 120/240 outlet when using it for 120. The cord has 4 outlets on the end and 2 go to one circuit, and 2 go to the other circuit, to balance the load. Would it rely on a special cord to supply 240v? It seems like they would mention that if it was true.

Does anyone have experience with this gen, or know enough about electrical to shed some light on this for me? I don't need 240v, but I cannot rest if I don't know how something works.
 

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YouTube has several videos about it.
 

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The split 240 is normal and healthy, been that way with generators/welders since time began - some modern low power equipment does +/- 60V pulses to make 120 so it's a no-brain thing on balancing 120VAC circuits & they call it a safety thing avoiding worst case stray currents, but being able to run something unplanned like a house furnace, heat pump or deep well pump from portable generator is a good thing...

The 'main breaker' protects the 30A outlet, which is two 120 legs that make the 240 - then the smaller 20A resetable 120VAC breakers would keep the other split-phase circuit power flowing if the other decides to pop open and so keeps the 30A Main from getting involved.
For dinky small loads keeping stuff 'equal' is not that important, just will burn a little more fuel and the waveform your appliances 'see' might be a little more distorted - but running construction power tools etc. keep an eye on loads.
 

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Here's the manual in case you don't have one:

Would it rely on a special cord to supply 240v?
Yes, you'd need a cord with male and female 240v outlets

there is no switch, fuse, or breaker for the outlet.
Page 15 shows the fuse and breaker locations.

There's no voltage switch since using the correct cord and plugs in the 240v outlet is all that needs to be done.
 

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What he said above, I bought a aftermarket cord the I can plug into the 30 amp 240 volt outlet on our 6500 watt Generac to convert that 30 amps of 240volts into four 15 amp 120 volt outlets.

Mostly that 30 amp 240v generator plug gets plugged into the transfer switch on the house when the need arises with a different cord.
 

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The proper way to understand the four prong 240 socket is that we use split-phase AC in the United States. The four prongs are L1, L2, N, and G, which stand for Hot #1, Hot #2, Neutral, and Ground. Ground is the easiest to understand. That's the wire that runs to a long rod pounded into the soil to conduct current away from you if something goes wrong. It's usually color-coded as green. L1 and L2 are the "hot" wires that bring the current. Typically, L1 is colored red, and L2 black. The neutral can be thought of as the wire that returns the current. That's not really correct, but it's a simple layman's explaination. N is usually colored white. If you take a voltmeter and touch the probes to L1 and N, you'll get 120VAC. If you touch the probes to L2 and N you'll also get 120VAC. But, if you touch the probes to L1 and L2 only, you get 240VAC. That's how the special plug Flewish talked about works. It internally divides the current between either L1 or L2 into the N. If you were wiring a 240V appliance for 240VAC only, you could dispense with the N wire completely.
 

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Keep in mind "Westinghouse" is NOT the same brand your grandparents knew. Its just a name.licensed to products for the consummer. There is an industrial division that does nuke plants but the consumer stuff is just licensed CHineese goods.
 
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