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The range in our kitchen is relatively new and runs on natural gas but the oven requires 115v for the controls to work. My big push for a gas range was so at least the stove top could be used during a power outage, and hopefully the oven would work with generator power.

On Sunday we lost power (wind storm) just after my wife assembled a casserole for the oven. I thought, "no problem, I'll get out the generator." I plugged the range into the generator, but the oven would shut down after a couple minutes.

I'm trying to understand why this generator won't run it. It's a 5000w worksite-type generator. I've tested the electrical outputs on the generator and they seem fine. It isn't tripping the circuit breaker on the generator. The range (a GE Profile) seems to be "sensitive" to the output, so I'm trying to figure out if there is something I can change or if this generator/range combo just won't work. I've tried doing some research and I'm not finding much.

Thanks for any ideas!
 

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One issue with generators is the quality of the output. Electronics are very sensitive to dirty power. Chances are if you use an oscilloscope to look at your output you find more of a square wave than the sine wave that we see from the utilities. Square wave outputs can and have damaged items. You need to locate a pure sign wave inverter style generator.
 

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If that’s true that great info to know. Never heard of that. Wife and I have been kicking the generator idea around ourselves lately.
 

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Most regular gas stoves light the oven using a heated element which draws a fair bit of power and the element must get hot enough to glow to both turn the pilot light on and to light it. In our case after some searching we replaced ours with an 'off grid' stove made for use where no hydro exists and is lit by battery operated spark. Wont help you with your existing stove unless you can get enough power from your generator to get that element to glow but here is a link to a suppler of a stove that will work off grid for those that need such. Unique Appliances |
 

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Discussion Starter #5
One issue with generators is the quality of the output. Electronics are very sensitive to dirty power. Chances are if you use an oscilloscope to look at your output you find more of a square wave than the sine wave that we see from the utilities. Square wave outputs can and have damaged items. You need to locate a pure sign wave inverter style generator.
Thank you for this! I have heard of this and bet that is my issue.

Do you have any opinions on Champion brand generators? Honda's are nice but $4000-5000 for a 5000ish watt inverter generator is not affordable. Looks like Champion is not as expensive as Honda, but has parts support (unlike Predator from Harbor Freight).

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Most regular gas stoves light the oven using a heated element which draws a fair bit of power and the element must get hot enough to glow to both turn the pilot light on and to light it. In our case after some searching we replaced ours with an 'off grid' stove made for use where no hydro exists and is lit by battery operated spark. Wont help you with your existing stove unless you can get enough power from your generator to get that element to glow but here is a link to a suppler of a stove that will work off grid for those that need such. Unique Appliances |
I think my issue is deeper than just an ignitor. Electronic touch pad controls, WIFI connectivity (if we set it up), etc. It is basically an iPad attached to a box with burners, so it makes sense that "dirty power" would have tripped something in the electronics and caused it to shutdown.

I wanted something more analog, but was vetoed. She was ready to buy another electric range when the old electric range died, but I wanted the ability to do some level of cooking without power. It just happened that dinner was ready to go in the oven when we lost power on Sunday.
 

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Stick a decent inverter (producing good sine output) & battery in between your power source and your range?

If your gennie can charge a battery (bank) & charger, and the inverter is strapped to the battery (bank), it can supply the range with what it needs. This would let you keep using the current gennie, and/or you may not even need it if the batteries hold out.

We use a propane gennie, and it feeds a battery bank (when the sun doesn't); this in turn drives the inverter which feeds our house ... the battery bank is a "buffer" of power that is always available.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Stick a decent inverter (producing good sine output) & battery in between your power source and your range?

If your gennie can charge a battery (bank) & charger, and the inverter is strapped to the battery (bank), it can supply the range with what it needs. This would let you keep using the current gennie, and/or you may not even need it if the batteries hold out.

We use a propane gennie, and it feeds a battery bank (when the sun doesn't); this in turn drives the inverter which feeds our house ... the battery bank is a "buffer" of power that is always available.
My battery charger is a "smart charger" (read: contains sensitive electronics), so now this business of square wave (dirty) vs. sine wave (clean) power has me a little gun shy. The easiest solution is to sell my existing generator and buy something more suitable.
 

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The range in our kitchen is relatively new and runs on natural gas but the oven requires 115v for the controls to work. My big push for a gas range was so at least the stove top could be used during a power outage, and hopefully the oven would work with generator power.

On Sunday we lost power (wind storm) just after my wife assembled a casserole for the oven. I thought, "no problem, I'll get out the generator." I plugged the range into the generator, but the oven would shut down after a couple minutes.

I'm trying to understand why this generator won't run it. It's a 5000w worksite-type generator. I've tested the electrical outputs on the generator and they seem fine. It isn't tripping the circuit breaker on the generator. The range (a GE Profile) seems to be "sensitive" to the output, so I'm trying to figure out if there is something I can change or if this generator/range combo just won't work. I've tried doing some research and I'm not finding much.

Thanks for any ideas!
How much did the range cost and how much can you sell it for? My brother put a viking commercial 36 " in his house. Nothing electrical on it. It was expensive...
 

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No opinion on challenger, inverter styles do cost more due to the higher expense the inverter controls involve. But they can also slow the motor down on light loads therefore saving fuel.
 

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What is the power draw of your stove? There is not a surge when you turn on the oven like there is when you start an electric motor. Any inverter generator rated for more watts than your stove should run it.


This one seems to be too good to be true.

 

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Here is some info about a " GE Profile gas range," that the poster said he owned. All it shows for electricity needs is 120v , 60 cy. 15 amp. This does make it sound like his generator is not supplying the " clean power," that the range needs. I would not try to use that generator any more, due to possible damage to circuit board.


 

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Electronics run on DC, not AC. So, before the power gets to the electronics, it has to be converted down in voltage, then rectified to DC. At that point, the quality of the AC coming in should be irrelevant; if that's not the case, it's because they made the rectifier as cheap as they possibly could and still have it work adequately with good AC. For a few pennies for a big(ger) capacitor at the DC side of the rectifier, they could've solved the problem. They probably went cheap on design and construction anywhere else that's not obvious in a showroom setting, too.

If it were mine, I'd find the rectifier and add a good sized capacitor to its DC output. But that's something most probably shouldn't do if they don't know their way around electronics, and/or are worried about the warranty.
 

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Electronics run on DC, not AC. So, before the power gets to the electronics, it has to be converted down in voltage, then rectified to DC. At that point, the quality of the AC coming in should be irrelevant; if that's not the case, it's because they made the rectifier as cheap as they possibly could and still have it work adequately with good AC. For a few pennies for a big(ger) capacitor at the DC side of the rectifier, they could've solved the problem. They probably went cheap on design and construction anywhere else that's not obvious in a showroom setting, too.

If it were mine, I'd find the rectifier and add a good sized capacitor to its DC output. But that's something most probably shouldn't do if they don't know their way around electronics, and/or are worried about the warranty.
I assume you don’t work with electricity or controls. Spent lifetime working on high power electronics on them. Incoming power quality is critical, one reason why they sell multi thousand dollar power quality analyzers. Spikes, sag, dropouts, frequency, power factor, and many other reasons for this problem. But this is a generator and that design is known for poor power quality. If your advice is taken the op can buy his inverter style generator to test his new control board on the stove. About $400 for the board.
 

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I assume you don’t work with electricity or controls. Spent lifetime working on high power electronics on them.
Computers, actually. I looked up "high power electronics" just to make sure it doesn't have a meaning I'm not aware of. Doesn't look like anything relevant to the control electronics in a household gas range; I'm guessing they'd just go with the cheapest ordinary low-voltage electronics that will do the job. I'm going to stick with what I wrote, including the part about not doing it if you're not familiar with electronics. If I'm wrong about what's in there, anyone who should be messing with a circuit board will see that very quickly. Not that it matters, since it's pretty unlikely anyone will try it based on what I wrote.

By the way, re: your first post in this thread, there's no way any generator puts out anything remotely like a square wave. It may put out a very dirty sine wave, but it's still a sine wave.
 

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Nope, power quality doesn’t matter. This is a converter for heat treat firing. This is one phase of the line. Transmission plant, other machines and devices were very unhappy being fed that. Look up induction heating and see high power at work. My biggest to date has been 3.2 megawatt. Frequency to 450 kHz.
Notice the 2,000 volt spike that occurs on a regular basis. These photo show just 1 hertz of that sixty Hertz we call line frequency. 360 degrees of that one cycle. This noise sixty times a seconds is going to create troubles. Board death is not uncommon. And any recommendations on that filter cap value and spec’s?
47DD3576-65A2-4542-8AF4-D6B714EB9F78.jpeg
548537FF-52AE-45BC-83DA-2DE7242A380F.jpeg
The
 

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One solution that may, or may not be simple, is to add a simple " Non-Gizmo " gas range to the LP source. Use it for " back-up cooking when the power is out.
 
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