geeeesh what a year for breeding

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by Caelma, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. Caelma

    Caelma Well-Known Member

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    Babies, babies, babies all over the place, in the back room, in the barn, out in hutches

    Babies unexpected, bucks not doing their jobs, does taking 34 days
    anyone else having a weird breeding year?
    Got does pulling fur, trying to make nests in corners (guess they don't like their nest boxes lol

    Can't wait to see my new meat exper.
    NZ white X Palomino :D

    What is it about this hairless, blind, chubby little life's that make you stop and be quiet for the moment?
    Aren't babies (of any kind) SO COOOOOOOOL :D
     
  2. BearCreekFarm

    BearCreekFarm Well-Known Member

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    Glad to hear that your rabbits are doing their thing! We stopped breeding during the summer because our anticipated market failed to materialize. Then unexpectedly, in Sept, they wanted rabbit, and lots of it! Now we are scrambling to fill the orders and don't expect to get caught up until around March or so. Could have worse problems I guess, lol.
     

  3. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    Glad to hear that your rabbits are doing what rabbits do, make LOTS and LOTS of babies!
     
  4. nehimama

    nehimama An Ozark Engineer Supporter

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    Hmmm, not REALLY having a wierd breeding year here. Not doing that much of it, is why, I suppose.

    Had an awful time one year when we still lived in Michigan. It was May, there was a wonderful, fine, fat litter of show quality Checkered Giants, beautifully marked, five or six days old. It got hot, I tried putting the sprinklers on the cages' roof to cool them down, it got hotter, and the poor babies literally cooked to death. Had I had more experience, I'd have taken the nest box into the house (AC) and brought it back out to Mom in the evening. I was really bummed.

    Here, in SE Missouri, I just try to avoid breeding for litters in July, August & September.

    NeHi Mama
     
  5. Caelma

    Caelma Well-Known Member

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    I have a cousin who is a breeder and several friends who
    are all saying their does aren't taking.
    Different breeds also
    Here in my area we have a very late and mild summer and
    a very early fall.
    But theres a ton of early snow in the mountains so the skiers will be thrilled.
     
  6. Dian

    Dian Well-Known Member

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    I agree-bad year for breeding. People wanting rabbits and no babies because of the heat. Most of the babies born died from the heat and I lost one of my breeder bucks-again from the heat. Now its cooled down and I am getting babies, but I only have one adult buck and two juniors. I keep putting does in with the juniors, but no babies yet. So all my babies right now are from my white lop buck. I am getting some interesting colors and of course all the babies are beautiful no matter who they belong to.
     
  7. nehimama

    nehimama An Ozark Engineer Supporter

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    The summer here was awfully hot this year - ain't it always? :(

    My rabbits were originally in a three-sided machine-shed type of shelter, with the opening facing East. Made of unpainted galvalume (silver). It REALLY got hot under there. Even fans and frozen water bottles weren't helping any.

    So, one blazing hot 100-degree day in June, I decided I couldn't see them suffer any more. I moved the entire rabbitry up the hill to the old green barn. High ceiling, trees around it, a few holes in the old walls for ventilation, and darker inside. It's much cooler in there, and the rabbits had a MUCH better summer.

    I must've lost three or four pounds struggling the cages, supports, animals, feeders, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc up that hill, but it was worth it after all. Just knowing the buns were so much more comfortable made ME feel better.

    The change made breeding better, by far.

    NeHi Mama
     
  8. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    Well nehimama, I am glad to hear that you love your bunnies so much, they sure are lucky.
     
  9. Sinenian

    Sinenian Well-Known Member

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    2 Years ago my Angora both my Angora does had birth on the exact same day, a little unexpected :)
     
  10. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    You joking, we had 5 goats give birth within 20 days of each other, 2 within 6 days producing 3 babies (one from a WAY to young mother that got preggos on accident), then 12 days later 2 gave birth on the SAME DAY producing 3 babies, then 2 days later another female gave birth producing 1 baby. So alltogether 7 babies, 5 of which were girls.
     
  11. rabbitgal

    rabbitgal Ex-homesteader

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    Usually works like this: you have a huge demand for rabbits that you can't fulfill, and then once you do finally have a lot of rabbits, no one wants them anymore. :) Right now, my processor wants rabbits, my very humane and caring "snake guy" wants food for his pet (and if anyone else wants to sell pet food someday, may you find a snake owner like him!), and other people want breeding stock. I'm happy, but hoping those girls will start having larger litters. :)

    Anyone else feel like moving your bucks into your house next summer?
     
  12. nehimama

    nehimama An Ozark Engineer Supporter

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    Hmmm. . . .moving the buck(s) in to the house for the summer. The idea has merit, but my house is so SMALL. :bash:

    Whenever I have a doe bred for her first time, I like to have another, more experienced doe bred at the same time. So, if the younger one has difficulty or is not a good mom, or if there are too many babies, I can foster some off to the older doe. One time a young Flemish had 13 babies, and I had to foster some off to a much smaller mama who had only six. It was so funny to see those giant babies next to the wee ones. Both moms did a fantastic job raising all the young, though.

    NeHi Mama