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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This article was pointed out to me by a friend who still live in CT. In the current Lakeville Journal http://www.tcextra.com/news/publish/lakevillejournal/In_search_ofSilver_Queen
Point being WHY wouldn't farmers grow what people want to eat and not try to cram (literally) this crap down peoples throats? Do they just NOT get it??? I guess thats why I have started growing my own food this year. Tom
 

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Retired farmer-rancher
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Sorry, can't get into the article without being a subscriber. What seems to be the gist of the article??
 

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Keeping the Dream Alive
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ksfarmer said:
Sorry, can't get into the article without being a subscriber. What seems to be the gist of the article??
What's the odds that it's more propoganda from the GM lobby?
 

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Nohoa Homestead
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tomstractormag said:
This article was pointed out to me by a friend who still live in CT. In the current Lakeville Journal http://www.tcextra.com/news/publish/lakevillejournal/In_search_ofSilver_Queen
Point being WHY wouldn't farmers grow what people want to eat and not try to cram (literally) this crap down peoples throats? Do they just NOT get it??? I guess thats why I have started growing my own food this year. Tom
I'll never understand where this trend came in that corn has to taste like candy to be considered good. Personally, I do not like the super sweet corn that is being marketed in grocery stores today. I like my corn to taste like CORN not candy corn! I find the super-sweet stuff just revolting and refuse to eat it.

A couple of years ago I planted "Country Gentleman" which is an heirloom corn and I really liked it. Corn tasting corn - that is my kind of thing.

Monsanto (or whomever is promoting the GE Corn) can take their frankenfood and gently place it where the sun never shines. I will NEVER grow, buy or eat it knowingly or willingly.

donsgal
 

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I wasn't aware they had GMO sweet corn yet? Or is it something that they are considering putting out in the next year or 2?

Both insects & weeds are a real problem for sweet corn - it is more sensitive to regular corn sprays for weeds, and bugs ruin the crop in a short time. There is a lot of sweet corn grown around here, 10s of thousands of acres. The airplanes are buzzing all summer putting down the sprays. Not like regular soybeans & field corn.

While I can appreciate some not wanting the GMO corn to eat, I would look forward to much less poisons being used in the environment.

Anyhow, 2 sides to the coin, I don't have a solution either. Just, sure would be nice to have less insecticide sprayed all summer long.

I'm guessing they want to put RU gene in for weed control, and and BT in for insect control?

--->Paul
 

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I also am not aware of any GMO sweet corns. Is it possible we are confusing GE with SE corn? SE (sugar enhanced) corn is a hybrid developed the old fashioned way. And personally I love the se varietys, such as ambrosia, kandy corn, peaches and cream. At the local farmers market, everyone asks for the bi-color se varietys.
 

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Master Of My Domain
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the only bad ears of corn i got from my garden this year were the ones the deer opened. those ears had fungus. sure, i had a few worms in the very end of the ears on a few, but generally it was good. the ears that came from replanted seed...due to vole damage, produced later and had more bugs. i also had a few weevils on the tips of a few ears...still it was not too bad.

i have no problem spraying mineral oil on the corn. i didn't do it this year, but i may in the future. i can pull weeds and i can cut the bad spots out. my only concern is that once RU and BT seed gets used commercially, regular hybrid seed will not be available to the consumers who want it. i understand commercial growers may find genetic manipulation beneficial, but i hope that the choice will be there for the common gardener to grow what he wants to.
 

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Speaking of corn - a friend (another HT subscriber) and I each bought starts of "Honey 'N Pearl" at Lowe's as a lark. She put hers in her green house (sort of a hoop house) but she doesn't get the direct sun I get here. I put mine in a container outdoors and then later transplanted it to the raised bed. I used fishmeal, rabbit manure, composted chicken manure, prilled limestone/lime, etc. (I might have even cheated with a little Miracle Grow during transplant time but don't recall for sure on this stuff) and I'm not sure what she used but she doesn't use chemicals.

Keeping in the true form told to me by my in-laws that say corn cares more about TEMPERATURE than sunlight, her corn grew well over 8' tall and has a number of ears on it! Mine is about 3.5' tall and has - as of today - ONE ear on it! I was just thrilled I got anything out of it at all - even if it's only ornamental and doesn't kernel enough before first frost. But then I got a look at her's! Oh MY!

It was awfully cold here those first few weeks though and I should have kept my corn starts indoors for at least 3 weeks but put them right out doors since they were being sold in the outdoors section of Lowe's. Late frosts/cold spring nights killed off half the starts. The other two are still in my raised beds...

All my stuff thinks it's June right now - very slow to flower & fruit even with the good natural fertilizers. *sigh*

Did I mention that we're in southcentral ALASKA?! ;)
 

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keep it simple and honest
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There ARE varieties of GE sweet corn out there. The Seedway catalog had 4 varieties this year, but they made it difficult for the average reader to distinguish it from non-GE, calling the new characteristic "Attribute" (I think....looked it up several months ago), and even a former Agway manager (Seedway is/was really the seed division of Agway) thought that Attribute was a seed protectant because the description was so cryptic.
I went and read carefully studying the footnotes and astericks and yes, they were GM corn varieties. I thought it was kinda deceptive on how they had it marketed in their catalog, as the average or even above average reader would not have caught it. I think all the varieties were numbered varieties rather than named.
Ann
 

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This article appears to be from several years ago and is by Purdue University. It indicates that genetically modified sweet corn is certainly around.

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/hort/ext/veg/MWVVT2001/html/INBallard2001SweetCornBio.htm

I wouldn't be at all surprised if others aren't on the market since several years have passed.

Blame consumers not farmers for the products. Many consumers would absolutely freak out if an ear of corn they purchased had the tiniest of ear worm damage--let alone the possibility of having an ear worm present.

Consumers want it and farmers are willing to oblige. I agree that I would rather eat GMO foods than spray laden ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It certainly make these >farmers< if you can call them that look like dupes. I have long thought that chemicals are for those who are not farmers. Propaganda for sure whether they know it or not or would admit to it.
Donsgal, I agree sweet corn should taste like corn. I eat sweet corn once in awhile and prefer corn that is old and chewy. When I farmed (before the disaster of GE) I had no problem eating "field" corn.
Paul, Insects and weeds can be controlled through cultural practices. "10s of thousands of acres" Theres yer sign.... We need small farms!!! Why do you think GMOs are less poisonous than the horrible chemicals used now? Animals given choice will not eat GMOs.
Ann, GOOD RESEARCH! We need to keep alert to the loss of real food.
By the way its no biggie to subscribe to this paper.
Thanks for the responses. Tom
 

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I also don't like sugary corn. Family thinks it's great, me I'd probably be happy with early field corn like my grandparents served us taken from the winter grain stand for the cattle.
 

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tomstractormag, "animals given a choice will not eat GMO"..........so very TRUE. We have experienced that with our cattle.

And spraying thousands of acres of sweet corn........Oh my GOSh, that's just wrong. Our 500 acres of cropland(Corn and alfalfa) has not had any chemical spraying since the 70's and we DO NOT have a problem with bugs. If you let the BENEFICIAL insects do their job year after year.......there just isn't a problem........but generally chemically minded farmers just don't get it......if you constantly work against nature.....nature will find a way back.

GM sweet corn..........just say no.
 

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proud to be pro-choice
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Funny you should post this today - I was thinking the other day that while the locally grown sweetcorn was edible, I don't think it tastes all that good. Rest of the family does so I eat very little of it and don't comment. IMHO, they've gone too far with the franken-perfection. Gives me the heirloom corn, I just may plant some next year.
 

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ksfarmer said:
I also am not aware of any GMO sweet corns. Is it possible we are confusing GE with SE corn? SE (sugar enhanced) corn is a hybrid developed the old fashioned way. And personally I love the se varietys, such as ambrosia, kandy corn, peaches and cream. At the local farmers market, everyone asks for the bi-color se varietys.
Yes. People don't seem to realize that corn is the most engineered product in the history of mankind. In it's original natural state, corn is thumb sized and tastes like [email protected]

Corn has not reproduced naturally for several hundred years.

It's been engineered to serve mankind since the dawn of agriculture and we have bred it to our tastes over the years.

If people wanted corn that tastes like pickled herring, I'm sure we'll develope a breed that does just that!
 

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keep it simple and honest
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Hybridizing and selection are not the same as GM, as some of the comments have implied.
Much more field corn is GM than sweet, so some of the other comments are off.
In fact, I think very little sweet corn, when grown by market gardeners who aren't multi-million dollar businesses, is GM as I think there are still restrictions on buffer zones and having to plant non-GM corn next to them.
So, saying the sweet taste of some of the newer supersweet type varieties has anything to do with GM is almost exclusively not accurate.
These are two different subjects getting mixed together.
I personally like the su and se types of corn. I DO NOT want GM corn. My comment in an earlier post was about the four varieties that Seedway has in its catalog (mostly for bigger commercial growers, but not exclusively) that are GM varieties, but well camouflaged except from the very detailed reader who can put all the footnotes, astericks, etc. together to determine that the four are, indeed, GM. These are in a catalog that has, guessing, a couple hundred varieties of sweet corn total.
The devil is in the details, so let's not make huge generalizations if you aren't sure.
On the other hand, some solutions include buying your own seed from seed companies that state they will not willingly sell GM seeds. Or, by purchasing sweet corn (or other food products) locally where you can talk to the farmer and/or see where the food is being produced and see how it is being grown. Getting hysterical does nothing. Buying what you want may be the key to not encouraging the GM companies to keep putting out more and more GM stuff.
Of course, if GM products were required to be labeled as such, it might be easier. That must be taken up with your local, regional and federal elected officials! And they don't seem to be budging much!
Ann
 

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keep it simple and honest
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Hybridizing and selection are not the same as GM, as some of the comments have implied.
Much more field corn is GM than sweet, so some of the other comments are off.
In fact, I think very little sweet corn, when grown by market gardeners who aren't multi-million dollar businesses, is GM as I think there are still restrictions on buffer zones and having to plant non-GM corn next to them.
So, saying the sweet taste of some of the newer supersweet type varieties has anything to do with GM is almost exclusively not accurate.
These are two different subjects getting mixed together.
I personally like the su and se types of corn. I DO NOT want GM corn. My comment in an earlier post was about the four varieties that Seedway has in its catalog (mostly for bigger commercial growers, but not exclusively) that are GM varieties, but well camouflaged except from the very detailed reader who can put all the footnotes, astericks, etc. together to determine that the four are, indeed, GM. These are in a catalog that has, guessing, a couple hundred varieties of sweet corn total.
The devil is in the details, so let's not make huge generalizations if you aren't sure.
On the other hand, some solutions include buying your own seed from seed companies that state they will not willingly sell GM seeds. Or, by purchasing sweet corn (or other food products) locally where you can talk to the farmer and/or see where the food is being produced and see how it is being grown. Getting hysterical does nothing. Buying what you want may be the key to not encouraging the GM companies to keep putting out more and more GM stuff.
Of course, if GM products were required to be labeled as such, it might be easier. That must be taken up with your local, state and federal elected officials! And they don't seem to be budging much!
Ann
 

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It takes big farms to feed people that don't know where there food comes from (city folks :rolleyes: ).

Sweet is good. The sweeter the better. It's biology. The ear corn market wouldn't exist if all there was old fashioned dent corn. Average Joe likes it sweet... the company that makes it the sweetest will sell more corn. The company (and when I say company, I mean plant breeder) that makes bland, tastless, starchy, chewy corn will go out of business.

So, biologically speaking, sweeter sweet corn is the sweetest!
 
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