Garlic

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by birdie_poo, Apr 12, 2005.

  1. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    I love garlic. Would eat it all day, if I could. I decided to try my hand at growing it again, this year, after mixed reviews a few years ago.

    Just how much water can they tolerate? If I plant them in an area that gets LOTS & LOTS of water, wil I just end up with black fungus or rot?

    I am growing some in pots & in the ground...shallots, too.
     
  2. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Well, it's supposed to be planted in the fall. You can still plant in the spring, it will just make one big clove, not several like a normal bulb.

    I had a website before that had excellent info, but I've lost it. :waa:
     

  3. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    You know, I don't think growing seasons really apply, out here...I've been luck that way, since we really don't have the seasons, like back east. I'll see what they do and let everyone know. I was crushing some cloves, yesterday, and there were some that were so tiny, so I figured, what the heck, let's try it!
     
  4. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Where are you at?

    It is actually best to plant the largest cloves, they will give the largest bulbs, anyway.
     
  5. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    Cali, zone 9/10
     
  6. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I just bought some garlic from Shumway that can be planted in the Spring. I also started some last Fall that is shooting up even as I type (it does seem really happy).

    I wouldn't plant in a real wet place. Garlic does require some drainage. Hmm... I think I have a site on this... I'll just click over... Ah, here we go!

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/cropsystems/components/7317-planting.html

    Another good site:
    http://www.organicstyle.com/feature/0,8028,s1-41-30-35-364,00.html

    And I totally agree: The only thing better than garlic is MORE GARLIC!!!

    Pony!
     
  7. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    All alliums are alike in that they can handle a lot of water but absolutely hate having wet feet. Any area unsuitable to growing onions is also unsuitable to garlic. If only an area of heavy damp soil is available, consider creating a raised bed consisting of 75% regular soil and 25% sand. You'd want at least 8 inches above the soggy ground.

    Here's a good site on growing garlic:

    www.garlicfarm.ca/growing-garlic.htm

    Martin
     
  8. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    Oh, thanks for all the info...I just love garlic and was going to order some really eat kinds from seedsavers, but got in a money pinch...si, i planted a few elephant cloves and regular kind, then bought the shallot, already started. I love them, too!!!

    In the link, if anyone went there, I was wondering how wonderful it must have smelled to be in those pictures!! I think one of my most favorite memories when I was a kid was driving from WA to CA with my grandparents. I was asleep in the back of the truck and woke up to the most heavenly smell...we had just arrived above Gilroy, just in time for the Garlic Festival. I ate my pet garlic, though ;)