garlic planting questions

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Ninn, Nov 5, 2006.

  1. Ninn

    Ninn Custom Crochet Queen

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    :shrug: Can we plant it in window boxes and transplant to prepared beds in the spring? are there companion plants that should go in with it? What type of garlic grows best in my area (northeastern pa)? What zone am I in? (i don't even know that yet...lol) are there other crops I should be trying to get into the ground now before we have a hard frost? help please--i think i may have left this till way too late.
     
  2. SquashNut

    SquashNut Well-Known Member

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    I think it would be better to just plant them in the spring, as soon as you can get the soil worked. Unless you can get them planted now. But don't trasplant them.
     

  3. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We've never had good luck transplanting them. Someone one the list (Martin?) has written about planting them late, through a frozen crust on the soil, and they did ok. Otherwise, I'd wait until spring, too.
     
  4. dcross

    dcross Well-Known Member Supporter

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  5. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    No, garlic does not appreciate transplanting. Disturbing the roots often results in only a small round rather than a large divided bulb. It should be planted where it is going to be growing and not disturbed. Planting may take place any time that you can still punch a hole through the frozen crust. The latest that you can plant this year is 31 December!
    Garlic does not like to have close neighbors. They want all of the sun for themselves. Also, their system of thick roots are not very efficient and can not tolerate competition.
    All types of garlic may be grown in NE PA although hardneck types are better suited for handling the cold winters. My only losses in recent years have been some softnecks.
    You are probably 5b or 6a.
    Perennial onions and shallots could be planted now if you could find a supplier that still had any.

    Martin
     
  6. omnicat

    omnicat Well-Known Member

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    I'm between zone 5 and 6.

    As long as you can get a spade into the soil - it's not too late to plant. I sometimes plant in October. I'm hoping to plant in the next week or two this year. They start growing when the time is right. The only issue is whether you can GET them in. If it's possible, then it's not too late. I have planted in January when the soil was shovel-able, and they did fine.
     
  7. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    Last year, I was still planting garlic in late November. It turned out just dandy.

    Given my druthers, I'll ALWAYS plant garlic in the Fall, even if the snow is flying. The ground isn't frozen yet in 5a, so no worries. Get it in, get it mulched, and leave it till next year.

    Here's my favorite garlic site. Yes, it's for MN, but it'll work in your zone, and they've recently updated. LOTS of good info.

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/cropsystems/DC7317.html

    Pony!
     
  8. dennisjp

    dennisjp dennisjp

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    Thank you, thank you, thank you, for that site. I have been going according to what is on the seed packets and according to what I palnted this year, I live in zone 3-4-5--7- or -9. I still haven't figured that out yet.
     
  9. Ninn

    Ninn Custom Crochet Queen

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    Well, I checked out that wonderful site and found out that I live in an area where zones 5 and 6 overlap. That should make planting in the spring easier. We have decided, based on a number of things, to let the entire planting wait until spring, including the garlic. We will just harvest late and replant in the fall for the following year. We are definitely going with square foot gardening, as we live in a trailer park, and will be container-composting, just to prove it can be done. My DH, who has little or no interest in any of this at the moment (race season is winding down, ya know) has agreed to build whatever I need and pay for whatever I decide to buy. That could be really dangerous for him, I may decide to buy a farm. ....lol. I asked him if he was sure he wanted to get into this. He said he would try it and see. If it makes me happy, it makes him happy. I nearly cried!! He is already getting excited about replacing our curved roof with an insulated peaked roof to save energy and money. He is even gettin estimates already!! YEEHAWW!!
     
  10. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    In the case of garlic, it doesn't quite work that way. Many alliums are day-length sensitive. As long as the days are growing longer, the plants keep growing. When the days begin to shorten, so too does the plant. The difference in garlic maturity from fall or spring planting is only a matter of 10 days to 2 weeks. That holds true for probably 95% of the varieties with only some early softneck varieties minimally affected.

    BUT, spring planting will work for hardnecks if you have the stock on hand to plant as soon as you can make a hole in the soil. For me, that window would be any time before 15 April. Garlic doesn't need warm soil to begin growth, it only needs to be a few degrees above freezing. If the cloves can be planted in thawed soil on 15 March, the roots will already have a month's growth by 15 April.

    Either way, you will get garlic with the main difference being size of the mature bulb.

    Martin