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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have been trying to decide what to do with my garlic. Was forced to move (divorce) and have not gotten my garlic in the ground. Now its covered with about a foot of snow. Have about 15 lbs or so of garlic to plant. Not sure what to do. Could possibly get some planted in buckets and put it outside or in the basement. Don't want all my hard work to go to waste. Will it spoil? Can't plant it in the spring can I? Its hardneck garlic. Lisa
 

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Living in Alaska I do plant in containers in the winter. I had some potatoes start to sprout so in a large tub they are. I can not waste food. I keep things like this in the house. I have harvested fresh stuff totally out of season. In the winter we have bright lights running in the house most of the time for humans --they are the sad lights. The plants do quite well with these.
 

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Hey.

Putting it outside in buckets in colder zones will lead to possible freezing damage. Maybe put it in sand in the garage or cool basement(like you do with some flower bulbs) or maybe crisper in fridge until ground thaws out. Martin(Paquebot) knows alot about garlic...if he doesn't see this,PM him.

RF
 

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PS: You haven't built your homesteader root cellar yet?;-)
 

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You can plant the garlic during the spring thaw. Garlic needs to grow roots in cold weather. What I would do is, store the garlic in a cool dry place until the thaw. Usually here in NY we have a thaw at the end of January. I am not sure where you live. If there is no January thaw there , I would go ahead and put the garlic in the vegitable crisper so it can begin to grow roots. Then as soon as you can get on the ground plant the garlic before the last frost in your area. The bulbs will probably not be as big but you should get some garlic. Good Luck with everything.
Linda
 

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That's a lot of garlic to risk losing but you know the problem with most hardnecks is the lack of storage time. If you can find a place that just borders on the freezing point, that would prolong that period somewhat. Keep it as dry as possible and hope for a majority of the cloves to still be alive in the spring. An oddity that I have observed is that often a few cloves will be sacrificed in order to keep the rest alive. That will go on until there are only a few left and those strongest ones may last a year. However, not all varieties do that.

If you plant any in pots or containers, figure to leave them there to maturity. Garlic does not like transplanting. The slightest root disturbance will seriously disrupt the growth. Also, nothing less than a gallon of soil per plant.

Martin
 

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Paquebot. Garlic does not like transplanting. The slightest root disturbance will seriously disrupt the growth. Also said:
I can vouch for that I moved a few elephant garlic in the fall and they have not grown an inch since I moved them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks everybody. Will try some in buckets, have the garlic stored in my garage right now which borders on freezing. I live in southern lower Michigan and will have a thaw tomorrow. Its suppose to be 60 degrees!!! Then back to 20's the next day. Will wait for the Jan. thaw. Lisa
 
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