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I'm about to set my garden on fire! That might improve the soil...

We have been using rabbit poop as compost for almost 2 years now, and all of a sudden nothing will produce. Things grow, a few things, but they grow small and the tomato blossoms rot, the melons get about 1 1/2 inches then rot, and the peppers are tiny.

I told my husband I thought he was using too much. He would use a 5 gallon bucket for a 6x4 space between every planting season. We finally found our pH tester and it was between 8 and 9. So we added some organic acidifier, and it remains at 8.

I'm interested in how many of you use your rabbit compost. How much? How often? What are your results? Should I also post this in the garden section?
 

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Ash will raise the ph of the soil. Not improve it.

Are you composting your rabbit manure first? Are you adding any carbon sources? You should be able to mix straight rabbit manure in to your soil and plant immediately. The ph should go down around 7 when you have enough organics added back in to the soil. If you aren't mixing it with enough soil though there might be a problem. You need some "browns" (high carbon material) to go with "greens" (high nitrogen material like manure) to make a balanced compost and soil. You actually want something like 30 times as much browns to greens. Having lots of fresh manure kept damp will also attract molds and bugs to feast on it that can increase the damage done to plants. Everything in moderation.
 

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Are you rotating your garden crops to different plots? Some plant diseases will become prevalent if you keep planting same thing in same spot.

A lot of people keep rabbits and use the poop in the garden without composting.

The grass is always greener by the rabbit hutch.

Have a good day!
 
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Blossom End rot has to do with overwatering and then letting it dry too far. I started getting that, and luckily curtailed it before it went too far. Only half a dozen got it, the remainders were OK...
 

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I've used rabbit poop for years with great success. The place I was getting it from used straw under the coops, so it was already mixed in with browns. I just put it right into the garden beds. One 5 gal bucket per 4 x 8 raised bed, blended in well with the existing soil, which was primarily last year's manure, then sprinkled with wood ash to help balance the ph. I sometimes added a layer of sawdust, but not always.

If you are using straight poop, add some straw, chopped leaves or other browns to balance it out.
 
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I don't think the rabbit poop is the problem, although I would agree with the other poster who mentioned adding some more "browns" into your compost before turning it into the garden.

That being said, there are so many factors. Is your soil good enough and deep enough for lants to root properly. Are you watering enough or to much. Are you starting with good seeds/plants. Are your plants getting infections or ravaged by an insect that is killing them. Are you planting them correctly and at the correct time.

The only thing you can do is keep trying different things, monitor it, and see what helps and what doesn't. I would try getting that rabbit poop into a nice little compost pile with other materials and let it mix into a more beneficial material before releasing it into the garden.
 

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Not likely the rabbit poop. What kind of drainage do you have?
 

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How did the root systems look? slimy? off color? underdeveloped? whenever things look "fine" up top i always go digging... root equals fruit.

never had a problem adding fresh rabbit berries, although they always come with plenty of filler. as far as manure goes it's pretty mild, so even adding it straight shouldn't be an issue so long as there's plenty of substrate/aeration.
 

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I planted strawberries in a five gallon buck that was filled with nothing but rabbit manure, the strawberries did great. I don't think the rabbit manure is the problem, you really have not added that much per square
 

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Discussion Starter #11
We have all heirloom seeds for Annies, I do extensive research on the type on the strain of veggie I have and the temps it needs. We don't compost the bunny berries, but we do have a bin for kitchen scraps, maybe we'll start mixing half berries half compost and see where that goes.

I have seen an improvement as of late. We have 2 4 inch melons and 1 2 inch. And a 7 inch eggplant! Thanks everyone!
 

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I've grown many veggies in buckets of strait rabbit berries. No compost and no browns added. I don't even add dirt. Never had anything but good healthy plants. The problem I have is keeping the goats from eating the plants before the veggies are ready to be harvested.
 

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I'm thinking adding Lime at this time and let work over Winter.

big rockpile
 

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do not add lime. Lime is used to raise the Ph, the OP's Ph is already too high for most garden veggies. To lower the Ph on acreage, I added sulfur but that takes months to take effect. On a small scale, use a fert for azaleas or something like vinegar or waste oranges.

But I'm guessing you have larger problem than just Ph. In Florida, we have a huge root knot nematode problem. If you have been gardening in the same place for a few years, the nematodes can build up to the point annual crops will die prior to fruiting. Try moving your be to another location .
 
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