garden spraying

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by outsideman1, Apr 29, 2005.

  1. outsideman1

    outsideman1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    61
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2005
    Location:
    nc
    i know some of you will say this is wrong but i am going to ask anyway . i have a big garden for me and my parents , my wife and two kids. its about 100x75 and between work and everything else i just dont have time to chop it like i should . can someone tell me if there is anything i can spray on it to kill the weeds and grass but not the vegetables.
     
  2. momlaffsalot

    momlaffsalot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,398
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2004
    Location:
    Kansas
    I think you can use round up and it dissapates pretty quickly.
     

  3. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

    Messages:
    11,076
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2002
    Location:
    South Central Kansas
    "is anything i can spray on it to kill the weeds and grass but not the vegetables."

    NO!

    However you could use a product like "Preen" to keep the weeds and grass from coming up in the first place. Read the label to see if it fits your needs. Bought in larger quantities, i.e. 20# bags or was that 25# bags makes if fairly reasonable.

    I suggest using it within a crop row and a short distance to each side. The pathway areas can be mowed, tractor cultivated, etc. to save on using Preen on the entire area. You could also use Preen within the row and just to the sides, then use a glyphosate product like Roundup in the pathway areas. Just don't get it on anything you want to keep. It is a non selective product.

    Mulch will also help to keep weeding efforts down and will also preserve moisture so that less watering is needed, thus saving on watering time too.

    A high wheeled push cultivator dispatches a lot of weeds fast if used in mellow ground and used fairly often.

    Another method to weed control is to cultivate before the weeds emerge. That is while waiting for the crop to sprout simply work the adjacent ground about every four days to kill sprouting weeds. Work the ground before you see them.
    A shallow leaf raking beside the row would do the trick. If you see the weeds you are already too late for this method.

    Another method is to think big and use a tractor and row cultivator. In mere seconds you can cultivate an entire garden row leaving only the weeds within the row to be worked.

    Also, NEVER let any weeds go to seed. Some people start ignoring their garden toward the end of the season. Nope, stay on top of it and get rid of those weeds before they seed for the next year and years to come.

    While I'm rattling on---how about solarizing your garden spot for next year. Lay down some 2" X 4"s on edge to creat an air gap then cover with black plastic. On top of this add more 2" X 4"s, bricks, or whatever for another air gap, then add a layer of clear plastic and seal it around the edges with dirt, rocks, 2" X 4"s or whatever. After a few weeks many if not all of the weed seed will have been cooked so that it will not germinate during the following crop. It takes several weeks to solarize an area and higher solar summer temperatures so it would be too late for this for this year except for a fall garden.

    Prevention is always better than erradication.
     
  4. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

    Messages:
    11,076
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2002
    Location:
    South Central Kansas
    Another idea--is to use a glyphosate product in a handheld rope wicker.

    A PVC pipe device is made holds the solution, at the bottom is a rope wick to dispense it. You simply move the rope wick across weeds and enough solution is released to do the same as spraying them. With a rope wick device you have better control WHERE the product is dispensed.

    Hm, I'm not finding plans for a rope wick applicator on line easily. One site did mention a roller applicator. I expect you could use an old paint roller to dispense the glyphosate like product, but you couldn't load it enough so that it dripped or you might kill everything that it dripped onto.

    Years ago I bought a handheld rope wick applicator. I wound up selling it a few years later without ever having used it. I simply couldn't stand to let weeds get large enough so that it could be used on them.
     
  5. halfpint

    halfpint Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,585
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Location:
    Alabama
    I have found that putting a thick layer of straw between the plants helps keep the weed population down, and also keeps the ground moist much longer. At the end of the season, the straw is tilled back into the garden as it has already composted a bit. When we till in the spring, you can't see the straw in the dirt as it has composted.
     
  6. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

    Messages:
    19,568
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2003
    Cultivate and pull the Weeds until the soil warms.Then mulch good.

    big rockpile
     
  7. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,314
    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2005
    Location:
    TX
    Cardboard and thick layers of wet newspaper will smother weeds very quickly and you can make it more attractive by putting mulch on top of it. THat way you don't have to weed first, you can just plop it down, it's quick! Then later you get soil to mound up on your rows or beds, it's a pretty win win win solution IMHO.

    hollym
     
  8. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

    Messages:
    6,244
    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Location:
    Arkansas
    newspaper with any type of organic mulch on top of it.