Garden question

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by DomesticlyChall, Jun 15, 2006.

  1. DomesticlyChall

    DomesticlyChall Member

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    Jun 11, 2006
    Location:
    So. California
    We are doing our first year of container gardening, we started from seeds and everything sprouted and seemed to be doing great. Now the plants are getting bigger, and we are getting tons of blooms on the tomatoes, beans, strawberries, and cucumbers, but no fruit is coming from the blooms. What am I doing wrong? What are they lacking? Should I get some plant food? is maybe there not enough of something in the soil? The soil is a mix of organic compost, vermiculite, and peat moss.
    Thanks in advance for any advice.

    Theresa, mama to:
    3 busy lil girls, and baking a baby boy (due 9/8/06)
    27 assorted chickens
    9 ducks
    and 2 Nubian goats
    (slowly building our dream farm in the busy city)
     
  2. RockyRooster

    RockyRooster Well-Known Member

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    Could be they need plant food. It wouldnt hurt to try it.
     

  3. IowaLez

    IowaLez Glowing in The Sun Supporter

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    Since 12/14 in Osceola, IA. Before that 6 yrs in f
    Try buying some "blossom set spray" available from on-line garden vendors or brick and mortar garden centers. If you are getting blooms and no fruit, it would indicate the flowers aren't getting pollinated. The blossom set spray fools the plant chemically into thinking it's been visted by bees with pollen. In greenhouses they use bumble bees for pollination. Perhaps you should plant some flowers that attract bees near your vegetables.
     
  4. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) I agree with lezlie here. You need pollinators! There are quite a number of creatures who do this good work. Among them are humming birds, moths, butterflies, wasps, bees, bats, spiders and others that we don't know about.

    Our honeybee is in big trouble in this country being attacked many pests, diseases and sprays. In some places they have been wiped out and people are trying to attract the Mason Bee to take it's place. You can encourage them to nest where you are..call your extension service and they should be able to help. And the "Blossom Set" is a good thing. :p

    And as suggested, plant flowers that will attract nectar loving creatures of many species... they are just fun to have around as well as being useful.

    Your garden sounds just beautiful! Yum!

    LQ
     
  5. Abuelo in TX

    Abuelo in TX Active Member

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    Location:
    NE Texas
    I have 9 tomato plants in a 20 ft row. Eight of the nine are covered with blossoms and fruit. I have one Brandywine right in the middle that is covered with blossoms but not one fruit. Go figure. :shrug:
     
  6. wvpeach1963

    wvpeach1963 WVPEACH (Paula)

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    A lot depends on the zone you live in as to when you will get fruit.

    Didn't catch what zone your in?
     
  7. vegascowgirl

    vegascowgirl Try Me

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    If need be, you can pollinate your plants yourself. Use a q-tip to swab the blossoms. this transfers the pollen from one blossom to another just as the bees and others would. we've done this befor, both with veggies and with fruit trees and it works well. Can be somewhat tedious however.