Garden Mums

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by mommagoose_99, Oct 5, 2006.

  1. mommagoose_99

    mommagoose_99 Well-Known Member

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    I picked up some absolutely gorgous mum plants this fall. Bushel basket sized unusually colored for $5.00 each. I would love to propagate some more for next year. Does anyone here know how and when to take the cuttings? I know I will have to pinch the plants back all summer until around the fourth of JUly to make them bushy but should I make cuttings now as soon as the flowers stop or wait until spring? I will try to hold the plants in my basement this winter because they do not over winter very well here in Upstate , NY.
    Linda
     
  2. Jack in VA

    Jack in VA Well-Known Member

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    I've got bushel basket sized mums now from what I pinched off in the spring.I was gonna try an propagate for profit til I read on the pot "Propagation is illegal".
     

  3. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Not only does "Propagation Prohibited" preclude taking cuttings, but as Linda pointed out, they don't winter well. What's the purpose of advertising "Hardy Garden Mums," then? I called Yoder's (one of the big mum breeders in this country) last year and was told that they are not breeding for hardiness! They don't expect their mums to be perennial!

    I was very upset, as being perennial is what people expect in a "hardy garden mum," but the breeders are simply saying that means they'll be a living bouquet in your flowerbed for a little while, then die.

    So what's to do? I found the Univ. of MN website to be very helpful, as they offered an extensive list of mums recommended to be hardy for northern gardens (and that includes as far down as Indiana, as my friend there says Yoder mums aren't reliably hardy there, either). Some of the names I recognize from 30 years ago as being sold as garden mums, and there are a lot of new ones, too. I found a propagator in Faribault, MN and was very happy with the cuttings I received this spring.

    So, while the bushel basket mums are gorgeous, you will need to ask yourself if they're worth the trouble when hardy mums are available. Not too easy to find, perhaps, but certainly available. Ask at your local (independent) greenhouse for these varieties. It's not too late to order for next spring.

    Then, you can propagate by root division or cuttings to your heart's content.
     
  4. hisenthlay

    hisenthlay a.k.a. hyzenthlay

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    Hm. I'm certainly no expert, but I think you can still try dividing it and planting it now. I got one big pot of bright orange mums as a gift last fall from Sam's Club. I divided it into 3 (just pulled it apart carefully and more or less evenly), then planted them in the ground near the house. The foliage died and we cut it back to the ground eventually, but this year they popped back up and looked beautiful.

    This year I got some mums and asters cheap from kmart, and I'm hoping to do the same thing again, but we'll see. They got wilty in their pots pretty quickly....

    I say it's worth a try, anyway.

    p.s. "Propagation illegal"???? I've never heard of such a thing. Very strange.
     
  5. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If it is a hybrid that they produced, they can get a patent on it and forbid anyone else from propagating.
     
  6. menollyrj

    menollyrj Joy Supporter

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    Whenever I see a friend with mums in their flower bed, I ask for a few cuttings to root. I put them in an old plastic container (peanut butter or 1/2 gallon jug cut off) filled with potting soil for about 3 weeks, then plant outside. By getting them from a friend, I know they've survived at least one winter and are hardy. I also got numerous cuttings from the mums at my grandmother's house this past fall. She and my grandfather are both deceased, but I remember planting & pruning those mums when I was in my teens. Talk about hardy!!!

    -Joy