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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My freezer died about 3-4 mos. ago and I finally had the money to get an estimate on the repair and have the hinge fixed on my fridge.
However, the repairman told me the freezer is not repairable and it's only 4-5 years old. I was shocked.
He said the new refrigerators and freezers aren't worth repairing once the compressors go out, because the type of freon they now use sometimes gels up and causes the compressors to go bad - it costs more to fix them than it does to buy a new freezer/fridge.
So, here I am trying to be a good environmental citizen by repairing my appliances when possible and I have a practically new freezer that is no good.

I asked him which brand is best and he said they ALL use the same stuff and you have the same chance of this happening no matter what brand you use.

I thought this piece of information was worth passing along to everyone. I guess it's worth buying the warranty extension when buying a new one. The thing I feel the worst about is feeling like a throw away consumer and feeling as if I really wasted money on something I saw as an investment.

Hopefully my experience will help some of you when making decisions on new fridge or freezers.
My decision: I won't be buying a new one. I decided today, if I buy anything it will be one of the new refrigerators with the freezer on the bottom - which is bigger and I will definitely invest in the extended warranty next time. DH and I don't have children at home anymore, so it's not worth buying a huge new freezer.
The repairman told me, because of the freon issue, they are trying to come up with a new freon mix that doesn't cause this problem. Maybe I'll delay my purchase until then!
 

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Yes, old freezers / refrigerators make wonderful "containers" for grain / dog food, etc - anything you need to keep rats and mice out of.

I've also been told (although I don't really know how it would work) that old freezers / refrigerators make good fire proof safes. (Any firemen here or anyone who has had a house fire to verify?)

If you do keep them around though, just make sure they can't latch shut so no child gets in danger.
 

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Yes, old freezers / refrigerators make wonderful "containers" for grain / dog food, etc - anything you need to keep rats and mice out of.

I've also been told (although I don't really know how it would work) that old freezers / refrigerators make good fire proof safes. (Any firemen here or anyone who has had a house fire to verify?)

If you do keep them around though, just make sure they can't latch shut so no child gets in danger.

My guess would be that the fire would melt the plastic seal in short order and allow the fire inside. My GUESS being the key word there.
 

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A chest type would make a great personal hot tub....******* style!
 

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I've also been told (although I don't really know how it would work) that old freezers / refrigerators make good fire proof safes. (Any firemen here or anyone who has had a house fire to verify?)

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They last about 3 minutes, give or take. A friend had a car catch fire in his repair shop. He kept a defunct old deep freeze in the shop to keep all his oily rags and coveralls in. The heat from the car fire melted/burnt the seals on the lid, and/or warped the lid to the point where air got in to the oily cloth in the freezer and it caught within a few minutes. After the fire, the freezer was a charred, warped bit of useless scrap.

zito
 

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Well, I'm going to call horse-puckey on your repairmans story. Refrigerators have been sealed with sweated lines and such for decades now. The repair techniques for replacing a compressor hasn't changed in that time.

Currently, there are changes in the refrigerants, and that can make repairs a little more interesting. But if you do a standard vacuum drawdown and replacement, it's just as straight forward as it ever was.

Refrigerants causing the compressor to gel. No, not the oem refrigerant. Improper mixing of aftermarket refrigerants and oil can do that though. Which tells me a lot about how this repair technician works. I'd speculate that he's one of the problem techs.

There's nothing new about the expense of a compressor outweighing the replacement cost of a refrigerator or freezer. That's often been the case, and has been that way for a long time. A compressor assembly isn't cheap, and the installation isn't cheap either.
 

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Yes, old freezers / refrigerators make wonderful "containers" for grain / dog food, etc - anything you need to keep rats and mice out of.
Just make sure it's not where children could get stuck playing in it. There was a child around here not too long ago that got stuck inside an old refrigerator and died due to lack of oxygen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, I'm going to call horse-puckey on your repairmans story. Refrigerators have been sealed with sweated lines and such for decades now. The repair techniques for replacing a compressor hasn't changed in that time.

Currently, there are changes in the refrigerants, and that can make repairs a little more interesting. But if you do a standard vacuum drawdown and replacement, it's just as straight forward as it ever was.

Refrigerants causing the compressor to gel. No, not the oem refrigerant. Improper mixing of aftermarket refrigerants and oil can do that though. Which tells me a lot about how this repair technician works. I'd speculate that he's one of the problem techs.

There's nothing new about the expense of a compressor outweighing the replacement cost of a refrigerator or freezer. That's often been the case, and has been that way for a long time. A compressor assembly isn't cheap, and the installation isn't cheap either.
I don't know anything about freon, so I'm at the mercy of the repairman.

However, now that I've read all the suggestions for storage use, I feel much better. I can certainly use a pest free pantry and it has some great shelving and such, so it will make a very nice, roomy pantry.
Thanks everyone!:rock:
 

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I had my refrigerator go out in October and it was just 2 months over 5 years old. I was not happy. I thought that maybe I should have had the extended warranty, but the one I would have purchased would have covered it for 4 additional years, so it would have run out anyway 2 months before it broke. I was told by the repairman that my brand made the worst refrigerators, but who knows. Having just replaced everything except my freezer after 20 years, 5 years is not enough!
 

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My freezer decided to fill itself with ice. My neighbor says that's a sign that it's on the way out. I've had it for 17 yrs and it was 2-3 yrs old when I bought it for $200 from a guy. It's a big, until now, frost free, upright. I think I'll look into fixing rather than replacing. I don't want to buy a problem.
 

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I have a bottom freezer Kenmore and I love it.....it will take you forever to get over opening the main door looking for the icecream though!!!!!!!!!!!!! STill forget after 4 years. The pullout basket is really handy for organizing plus has a shelf on the door which holds ice cube bucket and a couple of half gallons of ice cream...is there a theme here? My DH does love his ice cream...DEE
 

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Sounds to me like your repair man didn't want the job. Ask him to do his job - assess the problem; give you the total and let you decide if it is worth it or not. Then check the parts prices online also. Call other repair companies and see what they think. Often it isn't the compressor - but they always think compressor first - rather than really looking.
 

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my brother had his 6 yr old fridge go out. repairman came out and told him it was the compressor. said that all the fridges today are all based on only a few (3-4) compressors, altho one of the compressors was slightly better than the others. in order to be "energy efficient", the compressors are undersized and run for longer duty cycles compared to compressors of the "old days". the old compressors used more energy, but were built like a tank and lasted much longer. So while you get more "energy efficiency" in the short run which puts a nice energy-star sticker in the showroom and gets the fridge sold, you have to replace the fridge much more often.

repairman said people that had bought expensive computerized fridges costing thousands of dollars had the same problem, and were none too thrilled with it.

due to labor costs, you're not likely to be able to fix it and save money vs replacing it.

not sure if there are any commercial solutions. (ie, maybe a fridge built for restaurants or something that's longer-lasting.)

--sgl
 

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I've seen articles where old freezers were used for root cellars, but can't recall how.

Could the newer freon be a problem? Someone I know (and my dad when he was alive) does refrigeration. He seems to prefer the old R-12 and will snap up any he can find to use in his coolers. He owns a grocery store. My dad prefered it, as well, but I never asked why.
 

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Wow, maybe my 40 year old fridge, isn't so bad after all! Remind me of that the next time I am in the middle of defrosting it.... although I am excited, DH got one of those heat guns for stripping paint, for Christmas. Its first use was for defrosting said refrigerator. It did help the process go faster. My refrigerator is like a Timex, it just keeps going and going.....
 

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my MIL thought one of these would be great...she's now 80 and can't bend over to see what's in the freezer. She needs one on the top. Can you imagine the old nasty freezer burned items we have seen??!!!
 
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