FYI a little bit of pepper info

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Deborah Stephenson, Apr 13, 2005.

  1. Deborah Stephenson

    Deborah Stephenson Well-Known Member

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    If anyone out there is like us, you will probably have more peppers in your garden than just about anything else except maybe tomatoes! My husband is into HOT peppers like nobody I've ever known (he's been eating them since he was a toddler, so they haven't made one yet he can't eat straight - like an apple). I don't go so much for heat, but I love the flavor of many hot peppers so I've learned to spice things up a bit with a lot of different varieties.

    The one thing though is that just about the time peppers grown from seeds really started to produce BIG TIME, it was almost time for the garden to start getting it's first cold weather. I'd tried starting them earlier and earlier inside and setting them out as early as late March, but they just tended to sit there and sulk and didn't really grow until it got warmer. Then it suddenly hit me...

    Peppers are perennials (chilies that is - this does not apply to sweet peppers, which are annuals). And being perennials, they tend to put their first energies into building up their root systems, so they don't start really producing in a big way until the 2nd or 3rd year. Of course, they are only perennial where the climate allows them to winter over (otherwise they would be killed by the cold.) So...

    I tried (several years ago) putting a few of my best plants in pots each winter and bringing them in. Every year I plop them back into the garden for the season and bring them in each winter. It works like a charm. There is a short period of readjustment when they are transplanted, but then they really take off! Since then I've never had any trouble harvesting and drying enough peppers to get us through until the next season's batch ripens! It works especially well with the chiltepins - they actually turn into a woody shrub that can be trimmed and maintained at about 3' diameter really easily!

    Happy Gardening!
    :D
     
  2. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    Do they produce inside as well?
     

  3. Deborah Stephenson

    Deborah Stephenson Well-Known Member

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    Those already on the plant will continue to ripen and they will put put out a small amount of aditional fruit sometimes through the winter, but I don't really encourage that. I tend to let them have a semi-dormant period so they can rest up and put their energy into producing in the spring. If you wanted them to fruit, though, you could keep up the light and warmth and I'll bet they would.
     
  4. Bladesmith

    Bladesmith Well-Known Member

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    Maybe you can answer this one for me. I'm growing an heirloom pepper called Aji Dulce. Supposed to taste like a habanero but without the heat. Have you guys ever had any?