FWIW:Pig feed

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by cashcrop, Aug 16, 2004.

  1. cashcrop

    cashcrop Well-Known Member

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    I went to the feedmill I usually buy my chicken feed from and ask the guy who decides the feed mixes why the other feedmills pig feed has oats in and what it's benefit is. He said "It is generally only usedfor a gestating sow or lactating sow as they need a higher amount of roughage in their diet." I then made the comment "Then in other words the pigs I'm feeding out won't finish out as quickly if fed a ration w/ oats?" He said "That's correct." Soooo, today I learned something and saved $.85/100lbs of 14% pig feed. Also, one can feed safeguard pellets to pigs to worm them and it DOES make a DIFFERENCE in their rate of gain(worming)!! It was also a lot easier/cheaper than ivomecing them! Thanks Uncle will!!!
     
  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It would be uncommon to have hogs that didn't have worms. They pick up everything on and under the ground which will also have worm eggs in it that were passed by them or other hogs. Worms waste a lot of the feed that should have nourished the pig. You won't see much signs of them having worms until up give them wormer, then keep an eye on their stools. they will pass the worms.
     

  3. Karen

    Karen Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That information is NOT true. It has nothing to do with roughage; it has to do with protien and differant protien requirements at differant times of a pigs life. Corn is very high in protein and is actually too high in protien for pigs your raising for meat until your finishing them at the end. They will put on fat, not meat gain. It also makes for healthier pigs to not use too much protien. Folks raised pigs only on corn years ago; however, the pigs were also differant then and so was the meat. Today's pigs are bred to be leaner and if they put on too much fat to quickly it does effect their health. Now, not saying that you can't raise pigs exclusively on corn -- just that it isn't a good idea. You could, however, feed corn exclusively if your supplimenting with a lot of good kitchen scraps for the added balance in their diets. Remember that pigs are just like any other animal and need a balanced diet -- not just one item.

    As for worms; ALL pigs gets worms at some point. As Uncle Will said, it's from all the rooting and pick everything from fly larva to God only knows what's in that dirt! Safeguard pellets are approved for pigs, but be sure it is not used prior to 20 days before slaughter. I've always used Wazine. You just mix it in their water once every other month and then I stop it 2 months prior to slaughter to be sure every bit is out of their system (although it also has a 20 day slaughter timetable -- but I just like to be sure). It's very inexpensive.
     
  4. cashcrop

    cashcrop Well-Known Member

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    Karen,

    I don't recall saying I was strictly feeding corn to my pigs. I said I am feeding 14 %. I was feeding 18% until they reached 125lbs. As for the pigs needing more roughage yes in a way it does make sense. Pigs will eat as much as you put in front of them....even sows. Now around here not everybody is the sharpest knife in the drawer. The feedmill may add the oats for three reasons.
    1. people over feeding their pigs or
    2. causing people to have to buy more feed.
    3. more universal feed mixture

    If gestating sows or gilts over eat it can cause embryonic death of their unborn piglets.

    As I recall from my ranch management classes in college oats is one of the harder feedstuffs for the body to digest.

    This is what "The Stockmans Handbook" says(on page 326 half way down the second column):

    "It is important that the condition of dry sows should be regulated so that they are neither too fat or too thin at farrowing time. Overly fat sows may have difficulty in farrowing and give birth to weak or dead pigs. Sows that are too thin at farrowing tend to become suckled down during lactation. Thus, one way or another, limited feeding is a must for gestating gilts or sows. This may be accomplished by any one of the following feeding systems(these feeding systems are further detailed in the section headed "Feeding Systems")

    1. By adding sufficient bulk
    2. By interval feeding
    3. By group hand feeding
    4. By individual feeding"

    I also looked at the swine feed ration recipes in "The Stockmans Handbook" for sows/gilts gestating & sows lactating. One of the four lactating formulas calls for 200lbs of the 2000lb mixture was to be oats. None of the gestating sow formulas calls for oats however, ALL 3 swine conditioning formulas call for oats. One pre starter formula calls for oat groats(dehulled) and one pig starter formula calls for oat groats(dehulled). BTW, each group of rations had either 4 or 5 different formulations.

    So, in all fairness to you Karen...yes it is true and false according to "The Stockmans Handbook". Depends what you read in it as well as what one is taught during ones schooling.
     
  5. Jim in MO

    Jim in MO Well-Known Member

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    Can I can ask a couple of questions here?

    We've been been using a mix 350lbs supplement + 650lbs rolled corn the guy at the feed store said this is 18% protein. Along with this we feed produce that we pick up from a local grocer ( This is another tip I got from the forum). Is this a reasonable diet for our brood sows?

    Also when we are finishing off a couple of feeders for ourselves we give them A LOT of milk from the cows. This really seems to kick the growth spurts into high gear. So far we have not seen the slaughter pigs overly fatty (I think). Should we be feed them differently. They usually get more corn and veggie scraps without the supplement.

    Also, the safeguard pellets, do you just add them to the food? Are they exspensive? Sounds a lot easier than ivomec.

    Thanks for letting me jump in

    Jim in MO
     
  6. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi Jim. I think your sows are eating well. I was wondering about the supplement you are buying. Is it a combination of soybean oil meal and other things such as salt and mineral or straight oil meal? The sows need the salt and minerals. If the supplement is 44% protien oil meal your feed would be over 20% protien. If You limit the sows intake until they are nursing pigs so they don't get heavy your feed is ok. I personaly would use less supplement to bring down feed costs. I know what they recomend but I've seen hundreds of litters raised on lower protien. I would use 1% TM salt and 2% mineral in their feed. I am not familiar with the wormer, but it sounds like pellets would be a feed additive.
     
  7. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Don't know about anyone else's pigs but mine don't digest oats well. I received a bags of oats by mistake and tried to feed it and it went through them- must be used for roughage/fiber/bulk if it is in pig feed. I don't disagree about your feeding method Karen. I defintely believe pigs should be given a more rounded diet than just one grain but I think you meant corn is high in carbs/energy rather than protein. It is only 8.5 % protein and a finishing pig should be receiving 14% protein according to the ag literature I've read. Corn will fatten them because it is high in k/cal. As for wild pigs, what I've noticed with mine is they need more protein at weaning or they will stunt. Happened with my very first litter, took them forever to reach 25 pounds. The litters this year grew twice as fast as last year's on 21% protein after weaning.
     
  8. Jim in MO

    Jim in MO Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Uncle Will, Yes it's a mixture of soybean minerals and salt. I was thinking that I could cut it back a little in the mix. The next time I pick up feed I wont have them mix it for me and I'll mix it at home myself.

    Jim
     
  9. cashcrop

    cashcrop Well-Known Member

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    I have been busy trying to drill out a bolt hole w/ stripped threads for a bolt that holds up my oil pan....wound up having to drop the front axle to do it!

    Jim, what you are feeding sounds fine to me. As for those wormer pellets they cost me a whole $1 to worm three 125lb pigs. I mixed it with their feed. Some feedmills carry it others do not. You may have to check around.
     
  10. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wow, I have never seen so much misinformation in one thread before.
    1. The protien in corn DOES NOT put on fat, the carbs do.

    2. Oats are higher in protien than corn.

    3. Oats are a key ingredient in feed rations for pigs weaned very young.

    4. Oats are HIGHLY digestible by pigs.