Funny - It's that time again!

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by OUVickie, Jun 21, 2004.

  1. OUVickie

    OUVickie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, once again, it's that time when the "girls" are coming into heat. Drove up Friday evening and one of the cows was standing at the back fence bawling over at the bull in the pasture behind us. I figured she was going into heat a few weeks ago when I saw another one trying to mount her. I could hear him bawling back at her, I don't know how long she stood out there doing this. When Hubby got home I suggested he talk to the neighbor about borrowing his bull. Last year "Norm" decided to visit the girls after a storm and ended up in the pasture the next day, uninvited by us. We all figured the best thing was to give them a month and let nature take it's course, but only one ended up pregnant. I figure we probably need a bull over here for at least 2 mos. in order to service them all.
    Hope Hubby can borrow one of the neighbors boys for awhile or we'll have a fence down in the near future. We shoulda named this heifer "Flousy"! :D
     
  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Some of the beef cattle raisers have young bulls tested to see if they can cut the mustard first. Many leave the bulls with the cows 60 days and take them away. Cows that aren't bred loose their happy home. That way the calf crop is closer in size and can be cared for more more easiily, plus groups of calves the same size sell better than one or two at a time of different sizes.
     

  3. OUVickie

    OUVickie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Uncle Will,
    Last year he and the neighbor only left the bull with the girls for 1 month. At the time we only had 3 heifers and only one ended up pregnant. Unfortunately we lost that beautiful little bull to ill joint disease this past spring. I had a friend here at work tell me it's best to leave the bull with them at least 3 mos. or it's not worth it to have nothing but heifers you have to feed and I agree. I think he should have already had the bull over here, I know two of them have already come into heat. Last year the bull pastured behind us just knocked the fence down during a storm. I keep telling hubby if he doesn't do something he's gonna have a fence down again!
    I know both of the neighbors bulls are fertile they have great calf crops every year. And the good thing is their both good heifer bulls, which is what we need for at least 2 of the girls.
    I hope he does something soon or she'll be standin' at that fence for the next 30 days! :p
     
  4. AR Transplant

    AR Transplant Well-Known Member

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    This is something every but me probably knew already. But just in case someone wondered.
    We are new to the dairy cow thing, and Isabella had her calf May 24th. Isabella went into heat last week. I didn't figure it out fast enough and went into the fence to get bring her up to milk her. This didn't set too well with the bull and he got between me and her. I still didn't get it, so I distracted the bull with grain and put the lead on Isabella. He stayed distracted for about 15 seconds and came running after Isabella. I dropped the lead and ran, then spent the next 30 minutes trying to get the lead off Isabella to just leave her alone.
    I didn't milk her for two days. And I didn't care. I sure hope she settled but if she didn't I am not about to interfer with her love life anymore.
     
  5. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That's funny if you weren't the one running from the bull. Did Isabell finally come home? I bet her bag was tighter than your rich uncle. I didn't understand if Isabell or the bull got over a fence, or was it your own bull? In situations like this a tractor, pickup, or horse makes it less scary. Cows usually are only in standing heat for one day. I hope you liked the bulls looks, because it sounds like Isabell will have a little rerun next year.
     
  6. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    I'm glad your only consequence of this encounter was a nice sprint! Never turn your back on those bulls!

    I agree with uncle that a truck or something is good. Get the truck between the bull and the cow and either lead her out the window while you drive back, or have someone sit in the back to lead her.

    Don't do this with a nice, new truck :) Those bulls have been known to take a charge at trucks and though you would be safe, your truck might take a beating.

    Jena
     
  7. AR Transplant

    AR Transplant Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the advice, Isabella is just one fence away from the beef cattle. My dh had warned me that when Isabella went into heat we'd either have to let her in the same pasture or else he'd have to fix a fence. For some reason I just thought I could milk her. Bad idea. And I am happy with the bull for the father, we hope that this one will be a bull (to make a steer) but either way we're going to name it "tasty". <smile>
     
  8. OUVickie

    OUVickie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Glad your okay!
    Last year when "Norm" visited, I was quite leary of going into the pasture. He was actually very gentle, but you never know. I don't like going into a pasture around a bull I'm not familiar with.

    I like your name for the calf. MIL told me when they raised calves to butcher, they named them Freezer (1, 2, 3...) that way everybody knew where they were going! :p
     
  9. Several years ago when we just had 2 cows & no bull, my Jersey & the neighbor's bull were looking longingly at each other one morning. There was a gate between us, so my DH opened the gate, & the bull came right in. The business took less than an hour & he was standing at the gate, ready to go home. The whole thing was repeated about 2 weeks later with the other cow. He must have been a good bull, because that was all it took, & we had 2 heifer calves the next spring.