Fun stuff

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by pcdreams, Jun 4, 2004.

  1. pcdreams

    pcdreams Well-Known Member

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    We made cheese about two months ago and started making soap this evening. Nothing much to brag about but I felt like sharing.

    I've enjoyed doing both and plan to continue..
     
  2. margo

    margo Well-Known Member

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    Never made cheese, but have made a couple very small batches of soap, and really enjoy that. Reminds me that I have some rendered tallow in the freezer to use up. I'm still a rookie, though. You know, I need to find a stainless cook pan with a pour lip for soapmaking, most saucepans I've seen don't have it. What do you use? Do you make large quantities?
     

  3. pcdreams

    pcdreams Well-Known Member

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    this is our first batch. We bought a set of stainless steel pots (5 in the set) use 1 for soap and one for cheese others are unused currently.

    They don't have a pour spout, however, that would be quite handy.

    we're trying castille soap. We'll see how it goes. Lot of oil so it may or may not work (may have to reheat it).

    I was suprised with the lye (never messed with it before). Anything that gets that hot by just adding cold water has got to be very caustic. I respect it :)
     
  4. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    I went to the Dollar general store and picked up a one gallon plastic bucket with a pour spout. It cost...$1! :haha:

    Put your water in a pyrex or glass jar or bowl, slowly add the lye (don't splash! and keep a bottle of vinegar handy in case you do!) and stir. Meanwhile heat your oils up in whatever pan you have handy - SS, aluminum, whatever...I've used the miscrowave at times, too. THEN pour the oils into the plastic bucket once everything hits about 105 degrees. Add the lye water (or goat's milk with the lye) to the oils and stir. I use a stick blender when I can - it whips it all up in about ten minutes and I'm ready to pour into my molds. Using a wooden spoon to stir it, you'll be waiting about 3 - 4 hours for castile soaps before they come to trace. BTDT...annoying, but sometimes neccessary. Using tallow or lard it only takes about 45 minutes to an hour. Pour into the molds. Unmold it the next day and cut your bars, unless your molds are already individuals.

    I'd be glad to give any pointers. I've been making soap of all kinds for four years and sell it at our Middle Ages Re-enactment group events.

    Sarah
     
  5. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I use a heavy stainless stock pot from stuff mart. I always make a big batch because it is no more work than a small batch and I don't have to do it as often. And I use the hot process. I seem to have more luck with it than the cold process that Sarah uses. I use the same pot to cook food in.
     
  6. pcdreams

    pcdreams Well-Known Member

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    We only stirred for 1 hr making the castille. Maybe that's whats wrong. also only brought it to 100 degrees.

    there are just so many different books out there its hard to know... :)

    we also have in mind to sell soap. Can't give any more details right now. Secrets.. LOL