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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am still looking for meat rabbits, but while I'm looking, I am thinking of eating (that rabbit I cooked two weeks ago using Maggies recipe has had me craving rabbit for days. Thanks Maggie!).

While I am building cages and getting myself prepared for meat rabbits, I thought I'd ask about frying rabbit meat. Can you fry rabbit meat? I went to the recipe section and may have missed a recipe on frying. I did see shake and bake. I used to love shake and bake chicken.

Any other recipes for cooking rabbit that might not be in the recipe section?

To think, I am hungry for rabbit but I'm stuck eating hot dogs tonight :-(
 

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Beautiful Bergen, Norway
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George in NH said:
I am still looking for meat rabbits, but while I'm looking, I am thinking of eating (that rabbit I cooked two weeks ago using Maggies recipe has had me craving rabbit for days. Thanks Maggie!).

While I am building cages and getting myself prepared for meat rabbits, I thought I'd ask about frying rabbit meat. Can you fry rabbit meat? I went to the recipe section and may have missed a recipe on frying. I did see shake and bake. I used to love shake and bake chicken.

Any other recipes for cooking rabbit that might not be in the recipe section?

To think, I am hungry for rabbit but I'm stuck eating hot dogs tonight :-(
The following 3 recipes are from Storey's Guide to Raising Rabbits by Bob Bennett and I can vouch for all of them...they're 'picky eater' tested and approved (the comments in the recipes are the author's own, not mine (but we agree with his comments) :)

Alice Bennett's Crispy Oven-Fried Rabbit
With this recipe, you'll make 'fried' rabbit without all the grease. It's a prizewinner, having garnered top honors at a statewide 4-H cooking contest in Texas one year.

Serves 4

1 fryer-broiler rabbit (2-2.5 pounds dressed)
1 egg, well beaten
2 cups potato chips, finely crushed
1/4 cup butter or margarine

1. Dip rabbit pieces in beaten egg, then coat with potato chips.
2. Melt butter in shallow baking pan.
3. Arrange rabbit pieces in the pan, and bake in a preheated 375F oven for 30 minutes
4. Turn the pieces and bake for another 30 minutes, or until well done. Test with a fork.


Golden Brown Fried Rabbit
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 rabbit fryer, cut up
2 Tablespoons olive oil

1. Mix flour and seasonings in a plastic bag
2. Add the rabbit pieces, and toss to coat well with the flour mixture
3. Place the pieces in hot olive oil in a heavy skillet over high heat, turning to brown evenly on all sides.
4. Reduce heat to low, cover and cook slowly, about 40-50 minutes, or until tender. For a crisp crust, uncover for the last 10-15 minutes.

Braised Rabbit
Alice likes to serve this dish in the summer with fresh vegetables from our garden. Son Bob contributes the thyme from his herb garden near the back door. He says that's why it tastes so good.

Serves 6-8

1/2 cup flour
1 1/2 teaspoons thyme leaves, crumbled
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon onion salt
1/2 teaspoon celery salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
2 rabbit fryers (about 2 pounds each) cut up
1/4 cup olive oil
1 cup water

1. Put flour and spices in a plastic bag.
2. Add rabbit pieces, and toss to coat well with flour mixture
3. Heat olive oil in skillet
4. Brown the rabbit in the olive oil, turning to brown on all sides.
5. Add water, cover, and simmer until rabbit is tender.

Note: You can also thicken the cooking liquid with flour for a delightful gravy


Hope those help,

Annie
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Anne, those sound good. The one with chips has me wondering though, who came up with that one?

The second recipe sounds easy and good at the same time.

I know Jane cooks rabbit so maybe she'll share her recipe(s) too.
 

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Glad you enjoyed my recipe, George.

You can do almost anything with rabbit meat that you can with chicken, including frying... but because rabbit is higher in protein and lower in moisture and fat, you might want to cook it at a slightly lower heat than you would chicken.
 

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We put some rabbits in a big stock pot and simmered them until the meat was falling off the bone.

Pulled meat from bones, mixed in barbecue sauce, and OMG does that make good shredded BBQ sandwiches!

The rabbit meat is dry and we used about two bottles of commercial sauce, if I recall correctly.

What we didn't eat right away I put into the freezer for easy fast meals when I don't feel like cooking. Nuke, slap on some bread, grab some chips or potato salad or similar and you're done.
 

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I was informed last night that domestic rabbit meat is considered to be all 'white' meat, and that it serves diabetics better than chicken breast when it comes to meating--(oops!!)-- MEETING-- certain dietary criteria.
 
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