Fruit trees, painting of.

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by Senior, Mar 17, 2005.

  1. Senior

    Senior Active Member

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    Question.

    Has anybody heard of painting the lower section 3 or 4 feet of a fruit tree to slow down the blossums from blooming? Almost every year my trees bloom to early and get hit with a nice frost that destroys the blossums. To many to cover up and to big. Regular size trees not dwarfs. Any help on this would be appreciated.

    Senior
     
  2. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Senior,
    The only thing I have heard about painting the bark of the tree is that it helps moderate the bark from warming in early spring. When dark bark (unpainted) gets warm south sun rays this time of year (or into May in the northlad) it heats up the tree and than at night if it freezes that could cause splitting.
    I suppose it makes some sense that if you paint white to reflect the sun rays, it would not get the tree that warm in the day. Thus it would help it from producing the inner flow in the deeper layers that go to help top growth, and thus early blossoming. Does this make sense?
     

  3. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    I honestly have not heard of anyone painting the bark to delay flowering. People usually paint the bark a light color to prevent splitting, as Moonwolf said, and to see borer holes clearly so you can get the buggers before they do too much damage.

    When I have a frost coming with blossoms on the trees I start up the irigation system. Running water will help to keep the temperature above freezing. The transition from liquid water to ice releases energy - so as the water freezes up it releases enough energy to keep the flowers themselves from freezing. It's the same thing they do in commercial orange orchards in California to protect the crop.
     
  4. Senior

    Senior Active Member

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    A very old farmer told me that by painting the lower trunk section white it reduces the absorption rate of heat and therefore slows down the sap rising into the tree and slowing down the development of the blossoms. Heck I am going to try it, my nectarines, plums and peaches are the most vulnerable so if it helps it will be worth the time and effort. Thanks for the imputs.

    Senior
     
  5. chickengumbo39

    chickengumbo39 Well-Known Member

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    Here in Arizona, we paint our fruit tree trunks to keep the bark from burning (at least that's what I've been raised to believe). I DIDN'T paint the trunk of my Avocado tree (slipped my mind) and it did "go down in flames" in the hot summer sun! (no real flames, but a very sunburnt tree, which died)