Fruit Tree Question

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Topaz Farm, Mar 28, 2005.

  1. Topaz Farm

    Topaz Farm Well-Known Member

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    We are planning on getting an assortment of fruit trees, apple, peach and pear for sure. Can they be planted all in the same area?

    Any opinions on what kind to get would be appreciated too.

    Also, does anyone know anything about fig trees. Mostly do they take a lot of water?
     
  2. cabe

    cabe Well-Known Member

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    I am no expert, and Im sure one will chime in but here goes...Unless you have some wild crab apples around I think you need pollenators for each tree. I think pears and apples will cross pollenate, but with todays new hybrids who knows what was the rootstock.Be careful about any cedar trees near the site, they will give cedar apple rust to the trees, but a spray is available.Its all I know, but figs are a mystery to me.I like them in Newtons. Marty.
     

  3. Topaz Farm

    Topaz Farm Well-Known Member

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  4. NativeRose

    NativeRose Texas Country Grandma

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    What Cabe said is right about cedar apple rust. Last week I discovered cedar apple rust galls all over my cedars and my crabapples aren't doing so well. Texas A&M Horticulture and gardening site has some good info. I am going to have to get rid of some of the cedars in order to have apple or crabapples.
     
  5. Ragamuffin2004

    Ragamuffin2004 Well-Known Member

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    Figs are supposed to be easy to grow. That said, I didn't have much luck with my first four, probably because of not having water on my property at the time. The young ones I have now are doing really well with regular watering during dry spells, but I wouldn't say they need lots of water except when starting out -maybe the first year. Once established, they are drought tolerent, except in sandy soil. Nematodes are probably the biggest threat to fig trees. Figs need to be planted in full sun for best growth and sweetest fruit. Planting against a concrete wall, south or west wall, will help during the winters if you get freezes. Needs medium to poor soil for best fruiting, but good drainage. I know some people here in zone 8b in Florida put rusted nails in the soil at the base when planting.

    I've never seen anything recommending against planting apples, pears, peaches, or figs together. My figs, apples, and peaches are all planted fairly close to the house and each other. Figs and citrus are closest to the house, then peaches slightly further out, then apples. Pear trees and pecan trees were furtherest from the house because of the size when full grown. Just keep in mind the size of each tree when full grown to ensure the larger ones won't shade out the smaller and the number of chilling hours each variety will take. You didn't say how large your property is, but unless it's tiny, it will probably have some microclimates which you will need to take into consideration when planting.
    Before planting, I suggest you get a copy of "The Complete Book of Edible Landscaping" by Rosalind Creasy. It probably has the best encycolpedia of growing edible trees, etc., of any book on the market. Covers everything from almonds to wild rice.
     
  6. Topaz Farm

    Topaz Farm Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everybody, you are a big help.

    I have 20 acres, but I also have horses which they will have the run of part of it. It is sandy, but we might be able to fix a special place for a fig tree (I hope).

    Come to think of it, my Grandpa had a fig tree and it grew in sandy soil (East Texas), sooooo I just might be able to get one growing here.

    I am going to make a note of that book and start looking for it.
     
  7. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    My fig is naturalized. It gets water as it rains. It was about 2' when I planted it 2 years ago, and now it is over 4'. I've had 5 figs off it, last year.

    They are in the ficus family, so you can do a little research. Mine has a mulch mat, and our soil leaves room to be desired, but it was planted with a big helping of rabbit doo. Decomposing granite isn't too tasty to my trees.