Frozen milk

Discussion in 'Goats' started by cricket, Oct 18, 2006.

  1. cricket

    cricket Well-Known Member

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    I froze extra milk during the season for use later in soaps and for us when the girls were dryed up. I've defrosted 2 bags of it and both were gross. The milk is frozen in ziplocs, flat. I defrosted the first one on the counter and the 2nd in the fridge. They both turned out looking like cottage cheese and separated. Any ideas? Do you think it got defrosted and re-frozen? Does it do this all of the time? Is there some magic way I'm supposed to defrost it? Is it too old? How long does it last frozen anyway?
     
  2. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Give it a good shake...I use bottles (2L or gallon plastics) and defrost in the sink and shake.
     

  3. PygmyLover

    PygmyLover nigerian & pygmy breeder

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    I believe you have to defrost it slowly and yes shake or stir it up. The cream melts before the wey.....or did I get that backwards?
     
  4. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    I can't get frozen milk to stay decent for more than 2 or 3 months. Shaking doesn't help. Maybe if it was pasteurized first it wouldn't do what it does, but it appears to be making really slow cheese, and the taste! OMG, not much is that nasty!

    So now I don't freeze milk during the really heavy flow. Instead, I scrimp a bit and save it during the last two months of lactation. I put a half gallon at a time into gallon Ziploc freezer bags, get the air out, and place the bag into a square Rubbermaid container to freeze. Once frozen, I remove the bag from the container and put in the next one. To thaw, I put a bag of milk into the clean Rubbermaid container and leave it on the counter in the morning. When I get home, there's usually a little chunk of ice floating around in the milk. Break that up a bit, pour the milk into a half-gallon jar, leave on the counter a bit longer to thaw a bit more, then put in the fridge. Works fine IF the milk is not too old.

    By the way, I use the container because the bags invariably develop holes being knocked around in the freezer. The container keeps it all in one place. I do not thaw in a sink of warm water because the bag would leak and I'd have watery milk and milky water. Yucky.
     
  5. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    I was going to ask how long goat milk could stay frozen, as I thought it wasn't too terribly long.
     
  6. PygmyLover

    PygmyLover nigerian & pygmy breeder

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    I have heard that is it good up to a year. I can't remember how long we kept ours frozen for though.
     
  7. Kathy'sKID

    Kathy'sKID Kelly in Nebraksa

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    We freeze milk and colostrum and have kept it up to a year, basically, our back up supply for our first kidders of the year. We thaw it on the counter and give it a good shake/mix up. Not sure how it taste as it usually goes to the kids or other animals.
     
  8. GoldenWood Farm

    GoldenWood Farm Legally blonde! Supporter

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    We always through it in our blender to get it to go back together. Fed it to our kids this year with no problems what so ever even if it did get separated we just blended it back together and fed it.

    This milk was almost a year old being frozen also.

    MotherClucker
     
  9. goatedintoit

    goatedintoit Truly Gems ADGA Nubians

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    Frozen milk will last longer in an old freezer than a frost free one. The frost free keeps thawing it just a bit so it won't last as long.
     
  10. frogdog

    frogdog Guest

    I've read that milk should only be frozen in a true freezer, not the freezer compartment of a refrigerator. The true freezer is much colder(0* or less). I also read an article in either Stockman Grass Farmer or Countryside(don't remember which) that if the milk is agitated a couple times while it's freezing, the quality is better. What that particular person did was freeze the milk in a jar or bottle, and shake it a few times as it freezes. The thawed milk is supposed to be much better if you do this. I've never had enough extra to freeze, so I've never tried.
     
  11. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    I sell all my milk frozen. The trick is to milk, strain, chill quickly and freeze only fresh milk. Milk that sits for any length of time starts building acid in it, it will rice or clump when defrosting. Never defrost raw anything at room temperature! Unzip your ziplock, put it frozen upside down into a ceral container from wallmart (rubbermaid etc.) it then slips right out of the ziplock, shake and serve. We drink GM all winter like this, never a clump. But it's true that you should not keep any food of value in a frost free freezer, turn off your defrost timer so it does not keep thawing and freezing the products. Yes it's a pain to defrost once a year, but it certainly keeps your food in better shape.

    You can get very reasonable 1/2 gallon milk jugs sent to your door via Fed Ex from Dahltech.com if you don't want to go through the credit check, then send them checks, wait for them to cash them and then let them send you the jugs. Otherwise they will bill you for the jugs when they arrive. Vicki
     
  12. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    So far, I'm not seeing anything that would make a difference. I'd like to find something, as I'd like to freeze milk during the glut instead of at the end of lactation. I do have a true freezer. I do milk, strain, chill quickly. It's chilling when I leave for work. I freeze it when I get home. I've thawed in the fridge and on the counter. If there's still ice, it's still very cold, and there's always still ice when I get home. Still, if the milk is a year old, it's nasty and separated, if it's only two or three months old, it's good and keeps very well once thawed. So, Vicki, how old is the milk you're drinking all winter long? What am I doing wrong?
     
  13. cricket

    cricket Well-Known Member

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    It was all frozen in the deep freeze. I did have a couple of times when it was unplugged and I didn't realize it for a couple of days. The milk looks like oily cottage cheese when defrosting. I mean, enough so that shaking isn't really an option. I was afraid to taste it even. The milk was strained, chilled and frozen very quickly; probably within 10 or 15 min of it coming out of the goat. If anything sits it gets given to the dogs...I've had a few times when I forgot the milk on the counter. Ooops. I'll dig one out of the bottom where they didn't get defrosted or the temps didn't change much and try it again.
     
  14. Idahoe

    Idahoe Menagerie More~on

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    The clumps are just dried fat globules. I made cheddar yesterday with 1 1/2 gallons fresh from the goat that morn milk and 1 1/2 gallon frozen milk (in a deep freeze, in ziplocks). At least in cheese making, the fat globs "melted" and homogenized during the heating process.

    We don't mind a few floaters in our milk -- part of being on a farm -- and so far, we can't taste a bad difference in it. I must have 10 gallons easily in my deepfreeze, and that's nothin' compared to some.
     
  15. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

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    I am trying this. Last year we froze our milk as fresh as possible. Usually, the very same day we milked. It all separated when thawing. This year I am leting it sit in the fridge for a couple of days, until the ceram rises. Then I shake it and freeze it. I unfroze some that had been frozen for a little over a month, and it did good. I know that in previous years, whne we bought our goat milk, we had no problem freezing milk and thawing later. So, the only difference I could come up with in my mind is that the previous milk we bought was never frozen the day it was milked, always 2 or 3 days later.

    Also, just want to note that I have had milk in my fridge that last a week or longer without going bad.
     
  16. cricket

    cricket Well-Known Member

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    There's only a couple of times that I've had it in my fridge for more than a day. Usually we drink it the same day. However, I've also noticed on those occasions when it was left in more than a couple of days, it would go bad quickly. I just figured it was due to not pasturizing. Again, it's all done very quickly so I don't think it's developing a bacteria overload while straining. I'm also using Nolvasan as a teat dip/wash. And I'm very thorough with it. I don't know. I'll try it again and see what happens.
     
  17. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    I have no idea why your milk is clumping. I plop two frozen soda bottles (labels removed) into my milking can, so the milk goes from teats through the inflations, tubes and over the ice to chill it. I also started putting butter muslin under the can of my lid so I don't have to strain again in the house. This chilled milk is poured into 2 gallon totes that also have a soda ice bottle in it, and are taken to the house to be poured into the 1/2 gallon jugs, they are put into the top of my refridgerator freezer, they freeze faster in there than in the deep freeze. Once solid the next day they go into the chest freezer, and wait for sale, or for us (I stop sales Dec 15th to build up my own milk for drinking, making soap and cheese). I date the top of the caps, so milk can be as old as March or April if it didn't get rotated through during sales, and it's fine that Dec through Feb. Yes we get the very normal clumps of butterfat Nubian milk gives you, but we never have curds and whey seperation. I used ziplocks for years, this is the first full year we moved to milk jugs and we love them! I used milkjugs for our milk as a trial, and we will never go back to freezing those leaking ziplock again :)

    My customers started me on this. They were buying fresh milk and then taking it home and freezeing it and complaining about clumping. One of them came to me and asked me to sell it frozen, which was soo much more convienent. I also sold frozen milk to a candy maker in 3 gallon buckets, her only rule was that the bucket got filled from one milking, with no hot milk poured over the top of frozen milk to fill it up, it was because it caused her more work in blending the milk smooth before starting her heating process for cajeta.

    So although I do have fresh milk for local customers, all my customers purchase milk frozen, and I never freeze milk that has set unsold in the fridge even for 12 hours. I use it in soap, because it also does not make really good cheese. Vicki
     
  18. manygoatsnmore

    manygoatsnmore Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've frozen mine quickly, slowly with shaking, raw, pasteurized, in glass, in ZipLocks, in plastic jugs...I still end up with curds and whey after a few months. If I freeze it and then use it within the first month or 2, it's okay - maybe just a bit of cream to shake up in it, but after that, it goes downhill rapidly. I use a manual defrost deepfreeze, and like Vickie, I usually freeze it in the fridge freezer first, then transfer it to the deep freeze within 24 hrs.

    I wonder if using a chest freezer vs an upright makes a difference? Vickie, do you use a chest or upright? I have only uprights at this point (I am shopping for a new chest freezer, though - I think the energy efficiency will pay for the freezer in a few years). Maybe that is part ofthe problem?

    I'm open to all suggestions. At this point, I'm just trying to make sure I have a goat fresh at all times, and canning excess milk for use in feeding animals, or in cooking. don't like the taste of canned milk for drinking, but it makes good pudding and is good in cooking in general.
     
  19. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Chest, it was the only thing that fit the 3 gallon buckets...and we learned the turning off the defrost timer from the Houston Zoo when we sold colostrum to them. I have no idea if that is it or not with no upright to check it with. I do keep the freezer full of milk for sales each morning in the top of the freezer in the soap house's fridge, but I have never had a customer complain about this, and never noticed it in my soap or house milk.

    Like too strong of cheese, it usually comes down to milk handling, and holding over milk until you have enough to make the batch...so figured freezing freshly milked milk without it sitting in the fridge ageing was the trick...perhaps it's not. Vicki
     
  20. billygoatridge

    billygoatridge Well-Known Member

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    I have had thawed milk that looks like cottage cheese also. I use it in soap and it doesn't affect the quality. Once you blend the soap you can't even see any clumps.