Frozen Lamp Oil

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by MsPacMan, Jan 4, 2005.

  1. MsPacMan

    MsPacMan Well-Known Member

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    Dec 30, 2004
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Hello.


    I'm new here. This is my first post. A neighbor told me about this website and suggested I visit it. I live in Tennessee, in a rural county on ten acres of land, which we have owned for about a year. We're escapees from a large city, and glad to be out of the urban jungle at last.

    We live in a small trailer. We'll build a home here someday, but right now, we're too busy developing the fruit orchard, planting extensive raised beds for vegetables, and building cost effective sheds to worry about building an expensive, stick built home, and picking up the mortgage that goes along with it. (Our trailer may be small, but it is clean, comfortable, and MORTGAGE FREE).

    The kids are older and have all left home. It's just me and my husband now.


    Well, enough of the introductions.


    I have a question that I am hoping somebody here might be able to answer.


    We have several oil lamps that we keep for emergency purposes. We bought ultra pure lamp oil, several gallons of it, and put it out in a storage shed.

    Come to find out, the oil froze during the ice storm we had last week.


    Anybody know if the oil is still good? Or what we should do about it?


    Thanks.
     
  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It's just as good as it ever was.
     

  3. antiquestuff

    antiquestuff Well-Known Member

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    Still good, thaw it out. Kerosene would be better though, it won't freeze like that. Plus, ultra pure shouldn't be used in many lamps, such as Aladdins, and I had no luck using it on a rayo. I just use kero now, much cheaper!
     
  4. diane

    diane Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the board!! We have a storage trailer and our oil froze up years ago but was fine to use.
     
  5. Ozarks_1

    Ozarks_1 Well-Known Member

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    As previously pointed out, thaw it out and use it; it's still good. Keep it from freezing in the future.

    FWIW - Most "Lamp Oil" is paraffin-based (sort of like a liquid candle) and will freeze. Kerosene won't freeze.
     
  6. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    Like the other posters I've have lamp oil stored in an unheated storage area. It has froze and thawed probably dozens of times with no effect. Bring a frozen, actually more like gelled, bottle into a warm area before you need it and you're set. In an hour or so it should liquify and be ready to use.

    The nice thing about the lamp oil is it doesn't have the kerosene odor that might be a problem in a smaller confined area.
     
  7. chickflick

    chickflick Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Texas
    I had a funny incident with frozen oil a couple of weeks ago. I ma a Massage Therapist and have a 'mobile unit' in the form of a cargo trailer.. ANYWAY, I have my supplies in it. My oil froze!! I wondered if it would be okay. It was organic substances; so it's been fine.

    It was just weird. I never thought about that happening.
     
  8. MsPacMan

    MsPacMan Well-Known Member

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    Dec 30, 2004
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Thanks for the information.


    Unfortunately, I have no other place to keep the lamp oil but out in that shed, or else here inside the small trailer that my hubby and I live in.

    Because of its flammable nature, I feel more comfortable storing it in the shed.


    But I am going to wrap it tightly in blankets; maybe that will help.


    Or should I just let it freeze and unfreeze of its own accord? After all, I live in the mid-south, not Siberia.