Freight shipping options

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Dave, Jun 20, 2005.

  1. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

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    I have some items I'd like to ship from CA to KS. Mostly heavy stuff like tools and a few hundred pounds of logging chain. I can crate it but I'm wondering if there's other options. I've used Yellow Freight before but it's been a long time. Only about 30 cu. ft. but very heavy and might have to split into two crates so it can be handtrucked.

    I'm wondering what'd be the cheapest method of shipping. I may also be shipping some other less heavier items and had seen a mention on this board before about a shipping company that'll drop off a container for you to fill and they pickup and ship it. I can't seem to find any info on that now so I'm curious if it's still around.
     
  2. Grizz

    Grizz Well-Known Member

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    i use fed ex ground freight they give me the best price on heavy stuff like backhoe buckets etc
     

  3. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Grizz. I'll check that out. I didn't know FedEx shipped items like that.
     
  4. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    I'd give Yellow Freight a call. I try to use them for everything inbound. They have an 800 number you can find on their website to get a quote. Once they figure out the classification, it's simple. If you can get it to the terminal and have something to unload it on the other end, you could use one crate. I'd put the box in your truck on a pallet. Then load it and fasten the cover. The forklift at the terminal can get it off. Whoever picks it up in KS can unload by pulling the top, if they have to. Make sure you get your discount.
     
  5. pamintexas

    pamintexas Well-Known Member

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    I shipped some Jeep doors via Continental Bus line once. They were too large to go through UPS or USPS.
     
  6. diamondtim

    diamondtim Well-Known Member

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    Dave,
    First thing, find out which carriers have terminals closest to your origin and destination. This can be done on the web. Yellow, Roadway, FedEx Freight, Con Way, Overnite and Old Dominion are all options. There may be several. Make sure they serve the area directly (an interline carrier shares the revenue and can cause problems (excessive transit time, damage, etc).

    Make your crate is as dense as possible. Allowing it to be handled by a forklift (make sure the bottom is strong and able to be banged around) and strong enough to have something heavy stacked on it so that the other load could bounce on it without breaking your crate (you can count on something being loaded on top of it). The size of your crate should be in the 36x36x36 to 48x48x48 range. Anything too big or too small causes good trailer loading difficult for the carrier. Label and mark your crate clearly so there is no doubt as to where it is going.

    Get the total weight of your shipment and get the proper classification for your goods. You can use an estimated weight to get rates, but ask the terminal to weight it on their scale to fill out the bill of lading (you can count that they will weigh your freight). Get a copy of the scale ticket for your records. You can determine your density (which will determine classification) by measuring the gross length (longest point, in inches) times the gross width times the gross height. Take that number and divide it by 1728. That will give you the cubic feet of the crate. Take the total weight (including packaging) and divide it into the cubic feet to get the PCF (pounds per cubic foot). This number determines what classification your shipment falls into.

    When you are getting rates ask what class they are using. Class 100 rates are about twice as high as Class 50 rates. Ask for a "courtesy discount" (this can be in the 25-45% range) or if you can have a company that is a regular customer of that carrier ship it for you, they may allow you to get their discount (talk to the shipping guys where you work).

    Just some tips from a guy who worked for trucking companies.

    Share the Love,

    Diamondtim
     
  7. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

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    I hadn't thought about putting it on a pallet but I can see where that'd be the way to go. Last time I used Yellow Freight was to send an old Coke machine cross country. I just blanket wrapped it and strapped it to a pallet. They sent out a truck with a liftgate and picked it up right at my door. It was around $200 to ship nearly 3000 miles which I thought was fairly reasonable but that was 6 years ago. Since then I kind of got spoiled by having a friend with a flatbed who ran all over the place and through my destination often. Problem is he won't be out this way anytime soon.

    I have a nice solid mil-surplus crate 40"Lx24"Wx18"H. I'm going to call around and see if I'd be better off building a pallet to fit it or just put it on a on a standard size pallet, square it off with some boxes and strap it all up.


    Thanks for all the tips.
     
  8. via media

    via media Tub-thumper

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    Were you thinking of PODS? "Portable On Demand Storage for all your storage and moving needs."

    I don't know the first thing about this company or its reputation, but I recalled seeing their ad on TV. Their website is http://www.pods.com

    /VM
     
  9. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

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    Yes, that's the one. Thanks.