Freezing eggs

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Quint, Nov 25, 2005.

  1. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    I happened to come into a pretty sizable quantity of eggs (about 24 dozen) and obviously there is no way I can use that many before they go bad. I was wondering if a person can freeze them. Out of the shell obviously. Perhaps in 2 egg amounts. Should they be beaten first? My thought was to freeze them in a small cup or container then transfer them to small plastic sandwich size bags.

    You shoulda seen the omelet I made for breakfast this morning. Took 12 eggs and was filled onions, green red and yellow bell peppers, canadian bacon, homemade sausage, homemade hickory smoked bacon, ham, hash browns and a pound or so of cheddar cheese. A truly monstrous thing that I will be re-heating for dinner and supper at least. Quite tasty too if I do say so myself.
     
  2. tnborn

    tnborn Well-Known Member

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    I have frozen eggs beaten and not beaten.Not had much luck with them.
    tnborn
     

  3. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Have never done it but have heard you should seperate the yolks and the whites???
     
  4. tnborn

    tnborn Well-Known Member

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    thanks grandmotherbear.
    tnborn
     
  5. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    I have frozen eggs with success.. Took two eggs, beat them a bit and put them in a little "pot pie" tin pan into the freezer. When frozen I slipped them out into a freezer bag. I have used these, and they are ok. Just thaw them and add to a receipe, or use like scrambled eggs... I suspect they will even work as an omelet. Unless the eggs already had some age on them, they will last awhile. Have you considered boiling some up and pickling them? You can put the peeled eggs into a jar with a brine like pickles and then you can proccess them like pickles, will last as long as no one eats them! (not long around here..) There is also the old way, water glass. Never tried that but it is suppossed to keep them well....
     
  6. dustyrose

    dustyrose Well-Known Member

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  7. Jenn

    Jenn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I freeze egg whites all the time. Eqq yolks haven't frozen well for me but I hear the two mixed can be frozen for future scramb eggs/omelettes. My aunt would feed yolks to the dogs/chickens- not a good idea to the chickens though I guess. And make tons of angel food cakes.
     
  8. Tracy Rimmer

    Tracy Rimmer CF, Classroom & Books Mod Supporter

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    As stated before, scramble them together briefly, and freeze in two-egg amounts in some sort of container that they can be popped out of when frozen. You can also separate and freeze the whites in ice cube trays -- but I don't use whites for anything on their own, so I don't do this. Two egg amounts seems to work well -- most recipes seem to work around this.
     
  9. Fourthistles

    Fourthistles Well-Known Member

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    When my hens bury us in eggs I freeze them like this: put 2 eggs slightly scrambled in a snack size zip bag. Then combine these small bags in a large zip bag and freeze. I use them mostly in cooking/baking and they work fine. The books say to use within 6 months but I have used a few that were almost a year old with no problem. They do get slightly thick as they age but no problem in baking.
     
  10. diane

    diane Well-Known Member

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    I whip each egg individually and put in lightly greased single serving yogurt cups. After frozen I pop them out and put them in large freezer bags. They can be all lined up and stored easily in the freezer. I use them in cooking and for scrambled eggs and omelets in the months when my flock doesn't produce as much as I want to use. I have found them to be totally satisfactory.
     
  11. delta9

    delta9 Active Member

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    According to my mom: quantities of two, slightly beaten, but also add a small amount of salt or sugar. Allegedly this protects the texture.
     
  12. auntieemu

    auntieemu Well-Known Member

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    Right. If you don't add sugar or salt, the egg will become gelatin over time. If you use salt or sugar, they will store frozen up to a year.

    When we blow out emu eggs, we scramble the egg, add either 1/3 teaspoon of salt or 6 teaspoons of sugar PER CUP. Then pour into ice trays, freeze and pop them out to store in ziplocks. Use the salted egg for main dishes and the sugared ones for desserts.
     
  13. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

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    Make sure they're just stirred, not beaten. Beating gets air into the eggs. You don't want that. :nono:
     
  14. Tracy

    Tracy Well-Known Member

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    My Dogs LOVE eggs. When I am over run with eggs I wash the shells and put the whole eggs shell and all in the blender. I do 12 eggs at a time. I pour the eggs into 2 ice cube trays. [it helps to spray the trays first with a non stick spray]. Once frozen I have 28 little eggcylces. I put these in vacuum bags and seal. The dogs have great wholesome treats and they love the frozen eggscycles! The reson I include the shells is the shell is a good source of calcium for dogs.
     
  15. CraftyDiva

    CraftyDiva Is anybody here?

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  16. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    Excellent. Thanks for all the info. Looks like I've got a project for tomorrow afternoon.
     
  17. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    Minced (ground) hard-boiled eggs work just fine in pasta sauce or casseroles or anything where you you'd wet-cook ground meat. And hard-boiled eggs, shelled, freeze just fine.

    Also, do a bulk-cook of curried eggs, and freeze what you don't eat fresh.