Freezer insulation??

Discussion in 'Alternative Energy' started by littlebitfarm, Sep 3, 2006.

  1. littlebitfarm

    littlebitfarm Scotties rule! Supporter

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    I've never seen it done but have always wondered if it would work. Is there any reason that I can't take insulation boards and duct tape them to the outside of my big freezers. As long as I leave the vents uncovered wouldn't this make my freezer more efficient??? They are in the garage so there is plenty of room and appearances don't matter.

    Anyone tried this? Any reason not to do it???

    Thanks,

    Kathie
     
  2. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i thought about that too. good thread choice. i thought maybe i could apply insulation board to my refridgerator and cover them with paneling. i would target the door, the top and the sides.
     

  3. Jim-mi

    Jim-mi Well-Known Member

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    Do you have seperate coils.......not likely any more.

    Go feel the sides when the thing is running are they warm..?

    if yes then the coils are just inside the outer skin\wall.
    The outer wall is suppose to dissapate the heat from the condensor...etc.
    if you put inso around it you'll keep the heat in--------and make it work all the harder....
     
  4. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    You can get that foil/bubble/foil insulation and line the inside of the freezer. Cut another piece to lay on top of the food.
     
  5. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Even our old "Co-Op" brand freezer has the coils in the outer skin of the freezer box, so it wouldn't work on it. If your freezer has seperate coils clearly seperated from the box, you could insulate it on the outside of the box as long as the coils still have good air circulation. No seperate coils, then the coils are in the box under the sheet metal and added insulation on the outside would be counter-productive, as mentioned above. You could however insulate as much as you want on the outside of the lid. And you could add as much as you want on the inside.
     
  6. littlebitfarm

    littlebitfarm Scotties rule! Supporter

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    If the coils are in the outer skin. Would they be on every side? Or just on one side? With the chest freezer (16 years old) you can open it up and you know exactly where the motor is because there is bump into the inside for it. The upright freezer is not so obvious.

    Kathie
     
  7. Jim-mi

    Jim-mi Well-Known Member

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    "Would they be on every side"
    Give it the ole hand feeling test (very hi tec) after it has been running awhile..........

    And your answer is.......??

    And ya can't put much of anything on the inside either, cause the coils are under the *inner skin*

    Once apond a time I bought a small, almost square freezer I had the intentions of adding 4 inches of foam all around it.
    Wow...wont that be efficient.........

    Boy was I p***ed when I discovered three sides of that turkey were warm when the thing was running........
    .
    It is now freely spining somebody else's meter now.
     
  8. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    I almost started the same thread a week ago that is funny.