Freeze Drying Clothes?

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by largentdepoche, Nov 29, 2006.

  1. largentdepoche

    largentdepoche Well-Known Member

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    Has anyone done this?

    I was wondering what it would be like to hang your clothes out to dry in very cold winter weather (wearing good gloves of course lol)?

    I read about Laura Ingalls doing it, so I was curious.

    Katrina
     
  2. DenverGirlie

    DenverGirlie Well-Known Member

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    So long as it's not raining or snowing I hang laundry year round. Takes a bit longer, but it works.

    I don't think I've every hung clothes when it's under 32 thou, but a a stiff wind even a below freezing temp would work.
     

  3. SFM in KY

    SFM in KY Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Did it for years in Montana and temperatures sometimes below zero. I don't remember how long it took, but I do know that they would dry almost completely. The areas under the clothespins didn't dry though, they were still damp when the clothing thawed out. Seems I remember draping the line dried/ freeze dried clothing over chairs in the kitchen to get the last of the dampness out before putting things away.
     
  4. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    As a boy we lived in North Dakota. Mom would always hang clothes out in the winter and they dried fairly well. A little damp when brought in, but the thing I really remember is that they were frozen stiff as a board. She would stand the jeans up all over and when they thawed they would collapse. Time to pick them up and fold over a chair to complete the drying.
     
  5. momlaffsalot

    momlaffsalot Well-Known Member

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    Okay, you hang the clothes out to dry and they freeze. So you bring them in and they thaw. Then they are wet again, so you hang them over a chair to dry. Why not just start by hanging them over the chair in the first place? :shrug:
     
  6. Fujiko

    Fujiko Well-Known Member

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    Because you don't want all of that extra moisture in your house. When it gets that cold, condensation forms on the windows and the condensation freezes solid. Generally not good.
     
  7. largentdepoche

    largentdepoche Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the replies! :)

    We have a 10 bar clothes rack in our small apartment, I will dry smaller loads inside. We had a problem with black mold some months back so I have to be very careful to make sure I don't add too much moisture.

    I was wondering because our dryer is over 15 years old and you will never know when it's going to go lol.

    Kat
     
  8. jennigrey

    jennigrey Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They aren't *nearly* so wet after they've frozen. The clothes freeze but the cold air removes a great deal of the moisture from the clothes in the process. Kind of like freezer burn.
     
  9. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

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    My clothes actually dry faster in the cold of winter than in the heat of summer. In the summer here the relative humidity is well above 90% but in the winter it drops way down.

    It takes my clothes two good sunny days to dry in the summer but only half a day in the winter.
     
  10. momlaffsalot

    momlaffsalot Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. I learned something today!