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Friends can not keep their piglet, long story! He is a Landrace 12 week old barrow. He now probably [email protected] pounds. If we bought feed, no garden now) how much feed would be needed to raise him to minimum butchering weight. There are only two of us and this would be an unexpected expense. Free is not always free!!!!!
If I had an idea how many pounds of feed, on an average, I could calculate the cost. Thank you in advance!....Joan
 

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I'm not sure of the pounds of feed per pound of pig... but, I'd never raise only 1 pig.

Pigs (like most animals) are a social animal. 1 by itself won't eat as much, and I think you'd also have more chance of disease etc. because it's unhappy.

Pat
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A little more information. The piglet would be right next to the goats with only a chain link partition so would have some friends.
 

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a 35# 12 week old pig is way behind on his growth. My typical producer weans a 12 lb pig at 19 days of age, then the pigs are about 60 lb after 8 weeks in the nursery (11 weeks of age).

If the pig truly weighs 35 lb, then you will need another 200+ lb gain. If he is that weight I doubt he will have optimum feed conversion. If we assume a conversion of 3:1 that is 600 lb of feed to get him to market.

Jim
 

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You should also probably figure in the cost of butchering and cut and wrap - unless you're doing it yourself. If your butcher charges extra for cure (hams and bacon), that can add up, too.

And, don't forget, those processing costs are based on hanging weight, and not the actual number of pounds of meat you end up with.

You might want to call a local butcher and get a ballpark figure. He won't be able to tell you exactly because there are a lot of variables, but he should be able to give you a pretty good idea.

Janis
 

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you should weigh the pig on a scale holding him in your arms and then weigh just yourself to get his weight. My last litter were 70-75lbs at 12 weeks, i wean at 6 weeks to the date, they are on an 18% creep feed from 3 weeks on and then off they go at 8 weeks to their new homes. If he is only 35lbs at 12 weeks, i wouldn't take him. Now if you are just guessing the weight of a pig....well they are VERY deceiving!
 

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The last pig (of the 20) my FIL had, ran with my 3 goats... literally. Goats had the run of the farm and Miss Piggy would escape her pen and go with them. It was a sight to see, 3 goats and a pig trotting down the driveway all in a row. And then they'd stop for a snooze in a pile of dirt, all cuddled up. One doe even would lay on the pigs back. I was actually sad to see Piggy go down freezer lane.
 

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Friends can not keep their piglet, long story! He is a Landrace 12 week old barrow. He now probably [email protected] pounds. If we bought feed, no garden now) how much feed would be needed to raise him to minimum butchering weight. There are only two of us and this would be an unexpected expense. Free is not always free!!!!!
If I had an idea how many pounds of feed, on an average, I could calculate the cost. Thank you in advance!....Joan
The general rule is that it takes about 800 lbs of commercial feed to raise a piglet (what you have at 35 lbs) to market size (about 250 lbs). This, of course, varies with all sorts of factors like the breed, temperature, etc.

Have fun.

Cheers

-Walter
Sugar Mountain Farm
in the mountains of Vermont
http://SugarMtnFarm.com/blog/
http://HollyGraphicArt.com/
http://NoNAIS.org
 

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Landrace are a very long breed, made for bacon. I thought they were also kind of less weather-hardy, too, based on discussions I've had with people who want outdoor raised hogs. They frown on Landrace in the mix. Just adding that to the convo if you're thinking of raising him outdoors, he may need a bit more shelter, etc. than a hardier type. Plus, he wouldnt have any littermates to pile up with and keep warm that way.

In my experience, most FREE animals are worth less than that ;) They are given away because the person who has them can't handle the expense/time/labor or whatever that animal needs.

Or, it might just work out for you!
 

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The general rule is that it takes about 800 lbs of commercial feed to raise a piglet (what you have at 35 lbs) to market size (about 250 lbs).
Walter,

The General Rule of thumb is 600 lb for a grow finish pig from 40 to market. That is what I learned at the Land Grant University I attended and is a general guideline used by pork producers throughout the midwest.

Jim
 

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That 600 lbs. is based on a 3:1 conversion rate. That is the ideal, but how many pigs actually make it at 3:1. The 4H kids here are required to figure out their feed to gain ratios. Very few are 3:1. I think the 800 lb. suggestion is probably more accurate. We tell people to figure on 1000 lbs per pig, just don't buy it all up front. (But both of our market pigs did make 3:1)
 

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You could always butcher him at say, 36#. Do it yourself. Cook him like a big roast or two. Yum Yum, whats for supper?:coffee:
 

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Walter,

The General Rule of thumb is 600 lb for a grow finish pig from 40 to market. That is what I learned at the Land Grant University I attended and is a general guideline used by pork producers throughout the midwest.

Jim
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Another case of "skool-knowledge" trying to override old-fashioned "head-knowledge".........far be it from me to try and correct someone who knows it all. Walter has been raising hogs (and rather sucessfully too) far longer than most of us have even thought about where bacon comes from, so I'd rather figure in his higher amount than be unpleasantly surprised further down the road. That general rule of 3:1 is also used for raising spring pigs; not for overwintered hogs, where most of feed is being used to keep them warm. In the northern tier of states like New York where the O.P. is from this can be critical. In fact, I'd go more along with what Feathers-N-Fur suggested; and figure on MORE feed; especially with just one pig, but to get the best price on feed, it might be prudent to buy it all at once. That pig should definitely be weighed BEFORE you decide to "take it off their hands"......if it is actually only 35#, then it sounds like it is a runt and will be less than thrifty and will probably NEVER gain weight to be cost-effective. With that in mind, then edcobb has the best idea; fix him up on a spit NOW and be done with him.......that way will be the closest you're going to get to a FREE PIG!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Up-date on the "free pig". He looks great, gaining very fast. He is in the barn, next to the goats and snuggles in the hay on cold nights. He is very social and gets upset when the goats go out. He has food, hay and water 24/7 and weighs 70-75 pounds. He has eaten 2, 50# bags of feed and we are going to feed him out until he is @ 150 pounds or when the feed is gone.
Thanks to all for the input, we were lucky that we were offered a healthy pigglet...Ocsar Myrer........We plan on getting 2 in the late spring, this one was VERY unexpected!
 

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How does one eat something they have raised. ? I sure wish i could get over this hang up I have.
I have the same hang-up, so here's how I do it. It goes to the local locker to butcher, It comes home 2 weeks later cut and wrapped. It goes into the freezer, and I don't eat it for several weeks. By then I usually have something else to occupy my brain with it's care.
Good luck, it really is worth it.
 

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I'm glad your pig is doing well and gaining weight. I don't mind eating something that I have raised, because I know what the hog has been fed and how it was raised. It's great peace of mind to me knowing my family is eating good home grown meat, so I don't have a hang up over it.
 
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