Free golf cart

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Ed Norman, Sep 3, 2005.

  1. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    We went to the dump today and saw a 3 wheel golf cart in the metal pile. The guy said we could have it but he was closing in 30 minutes so we rushed home and dumped some hay off a trailer and got back in record time. He said the thing worked fine when they brought it in and they dumped the batteries in the recycle pile then paid to dump the cart. We loaded it up and he locked the gate behind us.

    If I had more time, I would have gone to the recycle area and grabbed the batteries. They must have dumped the cables that go between them, too. I'll go back Tuesday and see if I can find them.

    The motor is labelled 3 Hp at 24V and 4.5HP at 36V. Does that mean I can run it either way? If I have to buy new batteries, 24V might fit the budget better. To test it, could I put in 2 car batteries and hooked them + to - and hook the cables to the other posts?

    It is a Westinghouse Marketeer.

    On the way to the dump, we actually talked about buying an old golf cart and using it to make the 2 mile trip to the grocery store to save gas. 30 minutes later, we owned one.
     
  2. scott

    scott Well-Known Member

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  3. Esteban29304

    Esteban29304 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, it should work on 24 or 36 volts. The 36v system should give more speed & range. Use 6v golf cart batteries. Trojan brand name is good.12v car type batteries will be nearly useless.
     
  4. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Is the recharger built into the system and did it come with it? Would be nice if you could find a plate to plug into while you shop.

    There is a local guy in a battery wheel chair. He goes into town with it on a fairly regular basis. It is almost all uphill on the way back and he seems to make the trip fine.

    Also check to see what the restrictions are on operating the cart on a public roadway.
     
  5. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    hey nice score! :rock: if the batteries are not there ask around at some of the golf course repair shops, often they change out batteries before they go bad(can't have the liers and crooks gittin their shoes scuffed from walking cause the cart died!) most maintenece guys are talkable too. hope you can use it on your town trips, maybe an smv and call it a farm tractor? best check on the regs,tickets just arn't fun too pay! may need insurance too! :stars: if there arnt a lot of hills i would rig it up 24 volt otherwise may need extra power up hills!(or a push :grump: !)
     
  6. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    I read about the charger last night and didn't remember spotting it on first inspection, but I wasn't looking for it either. This town is built on a mountain and we are down below town. It is a straight up to the store, you could coast home though.I don't know about the SMV sign, but there is a Danger, High Voltage sign on the back that I like. I'm hoping a couple of car batteries will run the thing with the rear end jacked up, just to tell me if all the drive systems work.

    I've seen 6V batteries at Walmart. Good? Bad?
     
  7. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    I doubt the Wal-Mart six volt will work in the golf cart. You likely need deep cycle, marine type.
     
  8. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Costco sells 6 volt true deep cycle batteries,equivilant to Trojans and slighty cheaper.

    booboo
     
  9. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    These were labelled Golf Cart Battery. We have a Sams Club card, maybe they have them.
     
  10. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Lots of golf cart-related stuff on eBay.
     
  11. mohillbilly

    mohillbilly Well-Known Member

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    buy the cheapest batteries you can. they are all harmed by deep discharge, even if they say they are deep cycle. deep discharge is what kills them. run them till about 75%, then recharge.

    noo need for the"fancy batterries", I have worked with everything from sealed gel cells to spiral cells to a few exotics. they all suck to a point.


    your best bet is the cheap regular "car" batteries" and properly maintain them. there is little difference in an interstate and oreillys batterey, if any. buy cheap, and properly maintain them, that is your best battery route. hell, even walmart batteries wouild be a good bet with there decent warrenty....


    10 years in the 12 volt industry says so, thats why. :nerd:
     
  12. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Copied from Windsun.

    "These are some general (minimum - maximum) typical expectations for batteries if used in deep cycle service:

    Starting: 3-12 months
    Marine: 1-6 years
    Golf cart: 2-6 years
    AGM deep cycle: 4-7 years
    Gelled deep cycle: 2-5 years
    Deep cycle (L-16 type etc): 4-8 years
    Rolls-Surrette premium deep cycle: 7-15 years
    Industrial deep cycle (Crown and Rolls 4KS series): 10-20+ years
    Telephone (float): 1-20 years. These are usually special purpose "float service", but often appear on the surplus market as "deep cycle". They can vary considerably, depending on age, usage, care, and type.
    NiFe (alkaline): 3-25 years
    NiCad: 1-20 years
    Back to top

    Starting, Marine, and Deep-Cycle Batteries
    Starting (sometimes called SLI, for starting, lighting, ignition) batteries are commonly used to start and run engines. Engine starters need a very large starting current for a very short time. Starting batteries have a large number of thin plates for maximum surface area. The plates are composed of a Lead "sponge", similar in appearance to a very fine foam sponge. This gives a very large surface area, but if deep cycled, this sponge will quickly be consumed and fall to the bottom of the cells. Automotive batteries will generally fail after 30-150 deep cycles if deep cycled, while they may last for thousands of cycles in normal starting use (2-5% discharge).

    Deep cycle batteries are designed to be discharged down as much as 80% time after time, and have much thicker plates. The major difference between a true deep cycle battery and others is that the plates are SOLID Lead plates - not sponge. Unfortunately, it is often impossible to tell what you are really buying in some of the discount stores or places that specialize in automotive batteries. The popular golf cart battery is generally a "semi" deep cycle - better than any starting battery, better than most marine, but not as good as a true deep cycle solid Lead plate, such the L-16 or industrial type. However, because the golf cart (T-105, US-2200, GC-4 etc) batteries are so common, they are usually quite economical for small to medium systems.

    Many (most?) Marine batteries are usually actually a "hybrid", and fall between the starting and deep-cycle batteries, while a few (Rolls-Surrette and Concorde, for example) are true deep cycle. In the hybrid, the plates may be composed of Lead sponge, but it is coarser and heavier than that used in starting batteries. It is often hard to tell what you are getting in a "marine" battery, but most are a hybrid. "Hybrid" types should not be discharged more than 50%. Starting batteries are usually rated at "CCA", or cold cranking amps, or "MCA", Marine cranking amps - the same as "CA". Any battery with the capacity shown in CA or MCA may not be a true deep-cycle battery. It is sometimes hard to tell, as the terms marine and deep cycle are sometimes overused. CA and MCA ratings are at 32 degrees F, while CCA is at zero degree F. Unfortunately, the only positive way to tell with some batteries is to buy one and cut it open - not much of an option."




    YMMV,I got 2 months or so deep cycling Sears Diehard Gold automotive batteries. .75 amp alternator on a Baja Bug,powering my Bus systems.Drove Sears nuts replacing em,they finally tested my system(SURPRISE!Thats a REALLY GOOD charging system you got there :rolleyes: )they finally just gave me my money back and told me to leave,PLEASE.

    Bad BooBoo
     
  13. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    I tried to jump it with cables from my pickup but 12V wouldn't turn the motor. I got two old batteries and cobbled together a rig with a top post and a side terminal battery and the jumper cables. I got 24V and the motor turned forward and reverse, and the speed varied from real slow to slow. Neither battery was charged. I guess the thing is in working order.

    There is no charger, do they make a 36V charger or would I have to unhook cables and charge 12V 3 times?

    Who is right on the batteries, the cheap 12V guy or the expensive golf cart guy? I put a garden tractor battery in my boy's little jeep and it runs that thing an amazing length of time.
     
  14. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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  15. jgbndaudio

    jgbndaudio Well-Known Member

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    Hello,

    Don't listen to this guy! He's been doing it wrong for ten years.
    Do not use car batteries in a golf cart unless you want to replace them regularly. Call any golf cart place and ask them what battery they use (6v-Trojan, mostly). There is a reason they use the batteries they use!
    This guy is giving you Bad Advice!
    Scott


     
  16. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    Well, if it sounds too good to be true, it usually isin't. He does go against everything I have ever heard and read. We went to the dump again today and checked the recycle area but there were no batteries. I was mainly interested in the cables.

    We're making the journey to the big town tomorrow and we'll shop for batteries. Cheap ones. 6V deep cycle.

    I see some 36V chargers on ebay for floor sweepers and electric bikes. Would one of those work for this application?
     
  17. Esteban29304

    Esteban29304 Well-Known Member

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  18. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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