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Does the idea of eating cloned food bother you in anyway? Personally with all the reports lately of food hazards I've got a problem not knowing where it's coming from. I also think as a paying consumer I should know by labeling if it's organic or not, country of origin, and if it’s a science project. Guess overall though I have the choice of buying it or not. Leaning towards the later seems to be a safer option in my book.
GR

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/technology/technology.html?in_article_id=467510&in_page_id=1965
 

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Master Of My Domain
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i agree that proper labeling should be required to allow the consumer to make the appropriate choice.
 

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Keeping the Dream Alive
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In Australia manufactured food products are labelled with the ingredients, and the country of origin, and for a long time Australians have been demanding that processed food be labelled to indicate such if it contains GM ingredients. The biggest opponent to such labelling is the U.S. Govt.
 

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Why should cloned food be a problem?
It is a replica of something. It's not genetically modified, just copied.

If you wonder about anything being organic...just look at the price tag.
 

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Columnist, Feature Writer
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Decoding Produce Stickers
five digits starting with “9″ indicate Organic
four digits starting with “4″ is conventional
five digits starting with “8″ is genetically modified
 

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If you have ever planted potatoes, you have cloned food. You have produced identical copies of the genetic material in the original potato.
 

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I don't have a big concern about the safety of cloned meat (unless it's from China...); we eat cloned plants all the time. My concerns with cloning have to do with the dramatic effects it could have on genetic diversity. Imagine a nightmare scenario of a world on which there is ONE pig, ONE cow, ONE laying hen. The ultimate triumph of the factory farm system.
 

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I have no problem with eating cloned foods.

But I doubt cloned meats will be on the market anytime soon, it is an expensive way of reproducing animals, so, not a worry.
 

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This whole subject is so big it makes my brain hurt. All I know for sure is that we are working real hard to produce as much as possible on our own place.

I realize that it's a very complex issue and hard to avoid, but we do what we can and we vote and write letters!
 

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Shinsan said:
In Australia manufactured food products are labelled with the ingredients, and the country of origin, and for a long time Australians have been demanding that processed food be labelled to indicate such if it contains GM ingredients. The biggest opponent to such labelling is the U.S. Govt.

Is the U.S. Govt. preventing Australia from labeling its GM manufactured foods?

Labels are good, up to a point. You have to trust the labelling authority. And there's lots of labelling that's just designed to make someone feel good about their purchases. The 'organic' label is one. I've tried organic gardening, and it works great on a micro scale, if I sat out and babysat the plant continously, to keep bugs and disease away. A quarter acre garden... no way it survived... so if someone is growing hundreds of acres of produce, without any insect or disease attacking it, I have to really wonder 'how' they did it. Maybe we just have more bugs hereabouts.

I also use to like it when there were no labels... now if I eat some products, I have to put em back, because of the graphic nature of the labels... sometimes, I DON'T Wanna Know!!!

It's all carbon ore.

Reminds me of a one-panel cartoon I read last month... two guys in a life raft...one guys emaciated, the others roly-poly fat... the fat guy's telling the emaciated guy it's too bad all he (starving guy) can eat is organic healthy products, while he (fat guy) is munching away on a bag of cookies... :rolleyes:
 

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georgiarebel said:
I also think as a paying consumer I should know by labeling if it's organic or not, country of origin, and if it’s a science project. Guess overall though I have the choice of buying it or not.

The responces are interesting on this part.

Look up at top on the sticky 'NAIS' thread. Folks who are all for labeling food are _dead_ set against actually doing so! The paperwork is way too much effort for them.

Yet, 'others' are supposed to do so?

I know this is a complex issue. A lot of grey areas. Thanks for pointing out yet another of those grey areas. :)

--->Paul
 

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Master Of My Domain
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lack of true labeling for food is the result of the government pandering to the whims of big business that wants to boost profits without absorbing the risk of the loss of revenue from consumers who actually read the labels. it is funny how some entities reside on both sides of the fence on the free market issue. for goodness sake, we cannot allow the consumer to actually make an informed choice about the food they eat. it doesn't matter what the reasons are for a consumer selecting one food over another, health, religious, philosophical...whatever, the consumer should have the chance to make the choice.

and yes...potatoes are clones (99.9% of the time, unless new varieties are created via seeds), but i have yet to see cattle reproduce naturally from cloning.
 
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MaineFarmMom said:
Decoding Produce Stickers
five digits starting with “9″ indicate Organic
four digits starting with “4″ is conventional
five digits starting with “8″ is genetically modified
Processors are not required to use the "8". It's optional.
 

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georgiarebel said:
Does the idea of eating cloned food bother you in anyway?

To early to bother me, cuz there is no "cloned food" yet. Cloning is not agriculturally viable on a cost/benefit basis for food production, though it may be for drug and organ production.

Now if you are talking GMO food, it does bother me because while the processes are an acceleration of "natural," the end interactions can be unforseen. For example, who knew that genes from Roundup Ready corn and beans could land in pollen on weeds and still transfer their resistance to the weeds?

Uh, unfortunately not many know that even now. But those unforseen consequences -- or worse, the ones that are foreseen but not made public because they get in the way of the marketing plan -- are my worry.

Probably my worst concern, though is GMO bacteria. Few weeks ago, a lab reported it had been first to successfully transfer the DNA from an unrelated (but similar) bacteria into another one, and have it kick in so the implanted bacteria has all the characteristics of the one the DNA came from. Of course, it was hailed as a boon to making "beneficial bacteria." My concern is that we have a heckuva lot of bacteria in our guts, and we don't know what will happen once these engineered ones are out in the environment.
 

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Jim, I agree with you 100%! I don't think anyone really gave the possibility of trans-species genetic drift much thought when they released GMOs into the environment. Shows that we might have mapped the human genome but still don't understand all the intricasies of genetics.
 

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I may be taking this thread a it off topic but I think it is related. I am less concerned with how food is created and more concerned with how it is raised. Getting a cloned steer and so knowing what charecteristics he will have sounds great to me. We have been breeding with this same goal in mind for centuries. As for food I buy in the store I wonder. Go to a livestock auction. spend the whole day and watch carefully. At the end they will be selling "breakers" These are injuried, poor looking animals (they are broken so I assume that is where the term breakers comes from but I may be wrong.). They are being brought for a reason and it is not the humane society to nurse them back to health. Also sick semi birth defect calves selling for $2-$10. They are going somewhere. All this relates back to food. When I have money and can buy a steak I can see the cut, the fat, the size, the color etc. I am a bit concerned about antibiotics or steroids that may have been used but from the look of the meat I can tell something about the size and health of the animal it came from (I realize not everything but some idea.) Conversley when I read lables on proccessed food I see "meat and meat by-product". That scares me. I assume that all those breakers and poor calves are what is in that processed breaded beef pattie. Pre-cooked processed meat..... what is that? who knows? who cares? (again I know USDA inspectors but I am not trusting them with that stuff.) The proccessed stuff, the producers number 1 goal is more product at less price. Quantity and profit only. Quality is an after thought or a nagging problem to those companies. But it is cheap and convienient, just re-heat and eat. Even a child can do it. This sets up two problems. I do not think that this low quality processed food is as healthy as the steaks or other fresh cuts but, because it is cheap people buy it (Either saving money or do not have a lot of money). You do not have to search long before you find reports about how unhealthy Americans have become. I am not convinced that it is because of eating meat but because of the crap meat we eat.
I know lots of people who eat all the stuff we are not supposed to eat, but they are fresh and cooking themselves. Buy a steak, fresh vegetables and potaoes or bread. You can then see the quality of food you are getting. Prepare it yourself and you know what ingredients are going into your food. The problem is too many people can not afford to do this (either afford the price or the time) and so they eat the cheap convient crap. Poor food and oor health soon followes.
Raising your own food takes this one step farther. You know how the animal lived, how it was raised, what it ate, that it was healthy and that your meat is of good quality. The same is true with your garden. The goal of raising your own should not be how cheap (the big boys will beat you on that every time) but how good. Hard work and good food leads to good health. Not chasing fads and cutting out carbs or fat or eggs or well I think someone has tried to convince us that almost everything is bad for you. (Bread not healthy? oh my who would fall for that line?)
So anyway I guess it is not what lable, but the quality of the food we eat that is most important to me. Some will put an organic lable on crap if they can and make money at it. so..........
 

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I personally wont eat it KNOWINGLY I may have eaten some I didnt know about but would prefer not to.
I think it should be clearly labeled and that way everyone can make a educated decision as to what it is they would like to eat.
 

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I think the food should be labeled with country of origin, if it's GM, or if it's organic.

The consumer should have the right to decide what he consumes. Whether some people think genetically modified, non-organic foods are safe or not is irrelevant. My food, my choice.

:) RedTartan
 

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Jim S. said:
For example, who knew that genes from Roundup Ready corn and beans could land in pollen on weeds and still transfer their resistance to the weeds?

Could you give an example or some research of that happening?

--->Paul
 
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