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The High-Tech Ludite
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Yesterday my DD and her friend found a little Whitetail Fawn in one of our pastures. It was pretty beaten up from running into the fence so we cleaned it's wounds and put antibiotic ointment on the cuts and placed it back in the pasture with a bucket of water, thinking that it's Mom would come back to get it.

Well, it was still there this morning. :doh:

Now what? :shrug: :help:

The local Animal Control and state Fish and Wildlife Commission where of no help this morning.

I won't mind caring for it, if I knew what to do (I figure it could hang with the goats). Can it eat the same feed? :shrug:

Here are some pictures:

My DD's friend holding it while we were patching it up:



After we put it back in the pasture:






Any suggestions would be appreciated,

Thanks,
 

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My wildlife friend has said on occasion that you can do two things.

Leave it for the cyotes or raise it as semi-tame.

The later is a problem for you in the future. They will eat all your plantings but will be as cute as can be until a hunter kills it in the future.

Sorry to be so blunt but that's about what will happen from his pov.
 

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it looks like its walking away.... ?

if it was injure a doe might abandon it.

btw, it looks delicious.

Ive known people who have raised them as goats, if its a doe fawn, it will stick around with the goats or sheep. a buckling will end up being a combative little bucker later on.

both will grow up and want to wander off but then will have no fear of people or cars and get whacked.

id get a spotting scope and watch it for a day to see if the doe finds him and accepts him back.

if not..... raise it with the goats and make it a pet or plan on a corn fed venison livestock.

unless it likes you and wont leave, then I guess they make ok pets.

I dunnno.

it cant be any more ornery than a goat.
 

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Bob, I can tell you from years of working for animal control, and with the game department, that 99% of fawns thought to be abandoned, aren't. As another poster said, the does bed them down and then come back to them and feed them, as a safety measure. UNLESS the mother has been killed, she would have come back and fed the fawn. Now, whether it would have survived with the wounds is another matter. IF you can be permitted to raise the fawn with your goats, and IF it isn't a buckling, you will have to make that decision. Here in Colorado, you would have to be a licensed rehab unit to keep and raise the fawn without risking a huge fine. They are so cute, it's hard to resist keeping them. There are pros and cons to it. Ask the division of wildlife what to do if you want to keep and raise it, if you don't see the doe returning. You have put your scent on it, so she may or may not allow the little thing to nurse. Watch from a distance and see that it is feeding, looks like you have adequate grass for the mother to return if she can over the fencing. However the fawn may not be able to get back through the fence without injury. Just a toss up. Let us know what happens! Inquiring minds want to know! Jan in Co
 

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For future reference, I believe the best thing to do, is nothing. Do not touch or remove the fawn. Leave it where you find it. It will have a better chance of being taken care of by its mother. Once it is touched or removed by humans, the mother will not care for it.
 

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It does look nice and tender :) My wife would go with the saving it part though....Someone in Missouri raised a fawn and let it go....they put a hunters jacket on it too make sure it was somewhat safe....

If I saw a deer in a hunters jacket I would not shoot it... I would be too bewildered!!!

Noah
 

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Jan in CO said:
99% of fawns thought to be abandoned, aren't. As another poster said, the does bed them down and then come back to them and feed them, as a safety measure. UNLESS the mother has been killed, she would have come back and fed the fawn. Now, whether it would have survived with the wounds is another matter.
Yep. ITA.

Was it injured when it was found, or did it recieve its injurys trying to aviod being caught?
 

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If it's a buck, you WILL have to keep it under a very high fence, and stay away from it, for a couple months each year, or it'll attack you. On the other hand, if it's a doe, and you're a hunter, you'll be "golden" come hunting season. When she comes into estrus, she'll attract every buck around, even the randy ol mossbacks that are never seen. I'd break her to halter and train her to ride in the back of my truck, or at least follow me around. I'd size her out, and make a blaze orange body suit for her... and during hunting season, well... I'd have to buy an extra freezer, and make extra space on my wall for the monster buck boyfriends she'd attract... :angel:
 

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The High-Tech Ludite
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Discussion Starter #10
All,

My biggest concern is whether it was weaned or not. :shrug: Fawns around here in Central FL. are usually born around February / March which would make this little guy almost 6 months old. It seemed to only weight about 25# when we carried it to the barn for medical attention, so I'm not sure of that.

If they are weaned at that age, then I will only leave water out for it were it can find it easily since there is plenty of browse and grass for it to eat, and when it figures out how to get out of the pasture it will.

If it wasn't weaned yet I was thinking I may have to bottle feed it with goats milk.

As of now I'm assuming it is weaned and leaving it alone and keeping the dog away from the pasture it is in. Though when my DD checked on it this morning it started following her when she had her back turned to it, so hopefully I'm not going to end up with a pet Bambi. :shrug:
 

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Fawns lose their spots by six months. It is hard to tell from a photo, but this fawn looks no more than two months old.
Here is an article with good info.
http://www.arec.umd.edu/Policycenter/Deer-Management-in-Maryland/marchinton.htm


"Are fawns hiders or followers? White-tailed fawns are what we call hiders. As soon as they are born, they nurse and then go off into the bushes, curl up, and hide. The mother comes only about three times a day. She usually does not know exactly where the fawn is but approaches the general area and calls. The fawn comes to her and after nursing hides again. This is an adaptive mechanism to take advantage of the fact that fawns have relatively little scent as compared to mature animals. By moving away from the doe, the fawn is less likely to be found by a predator following the doe’s scent.

When do fawns start following their mother? Usually they are following some by the end of a month, and by the end of two months they are with the mother everywhere she goes.

How long do fawns nurse? By the end of two weeks, rumination begins. The doe starts to wean the fawn at about a month, and fawns are usually functionally weaned by 10 weeks, although they may occasionally nurse on through the summer and fall."
 

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Standard milk replacer in a bottle with a goat nipple could be tried to see if its still nursing....other than that, make water available, looks like plenty of forage is available to it already.

Long term, its up to you. I imagine if you want a deer for a pet, you could tame it. Might have to lock it in the barn during deer season, and neuter it if its male to keep it a bit calmer.
 

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The High-Tech Ludite
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My DW and I were talking and we think this is what may have happened with this little guy.

He was following with his mother who was able to jump the fence in our pasture but he could not. The reason we are thinking this is that we say it happen once before (last year) with the deer herd behind our property, but in that circumstance the deer were on the other side of our pasture. The mother then returned for the youngster that time and they went in another direction.

That is why we left it out last night with all the pasture gates open, hoping Mom would come back and lead it out of the pasture (I even left the front gate open as late as the night before hoping they would come back and get him).

As far as it's injuries, they were caused by it running repeatedly into the fence line when it and our Golden Retriever spotted each other yesterday. The dog never touched it (well unles you count licking it while we were holding it) but it got caught in the corner post and cut buy the wire. That is why we applied Neosporin on the cuts.

From what I've been reading online, deer are weaned at about 2 months which even if this little guy (I'm pretty sure it's a he) was a late birth, say around the begining of June, he should be close to weaned no anyway.

So I'll leave pretty much alone and just make sure it has access to water (90+ degree days with 75%+ humidity are a killer), and just check on him ocassionally to make sure he isn't in distress (physically that is).
 

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BobDFL said:
My DW and I were talking and we think this is what may have happened with this little guy.

He was following with his mother who was able to jump the fence in our pasture but he could not. The reason we are thinking this is that we say it happen once before (last year) with the deer herd behind our property, but in that circumstance the deer were on the other side of our pasture. The mother then returned for the youngster that time and they went in another direction.

That is why we left it out last night with all the pasture gates open, hoping Mom would come back and lead it out of the pasture (I even left the front gate open as late as the night before hoping they would come back and get him).

As far as it's injuries, they were caused by it running repeatedly into the fence line when it and our Golden Retriever spotted each other yesterday. The dog never touched it (well unles you count licking it while we were holding it) but it got caught in the corner post and cut buy the wire. That is why we applied Neosporin on the cuts.

From what I've been reading online, deer are weaned at about 2 months which even if this little guy (I'm pretty sure it's a he) was a late birth, say around the begining of June, he should be close to weaned no anyway.

So I'll leave pretty much alone and just make sure it has access to water (90+ degree days with 75%+ humidity are a killer), and just check on him ocassionally to make sure he isn't in distress (physically that is).

Since it wasn't injured, that sounds very likely, especially if they had been spooked by something. Just a few days ago we surprised a doe and her fawns on the road. The mom scaled the barbed wire easily, but one fawn tried and couldn't make it. It was a cow fence so it just squeezed through instead. If it was a tight fence, they would have been seperated.

Your plan sounds good. :)
 

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We raised a fawn a few years ago. The law here says you can't keep them 'contained' without a permit. We didn't. We'd take a bottle to her morning and evening. After she had the bottle, she'd go into the weeds around the pond and disappear. The kids looked forever trying to find her and never could until she was ready to be found.

As she got older, she'd go farther and farther away for longer periods. During hunting season, we put orange marker on the back of her ears and the top of her neck where she couldn't lick it off.

The only time she was aggressive was when she came back to have her baby. She wasn't pushy with the kids but kept the dogs cowering under the porch. She had her fawn just above the pond where she used to hang out. I'll post a pic if I can still find it.
 

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It's BBQ time. The mom, more then likely, won't come back since you have your scent, the meds scent, and the dog's scent on the fawn. Best bet would be to bring it in and raise it as a goat until it is big enough for the freezer. Check with your state's laws concerning this first.
 

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Nohoa Homestead
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BobDFL said:
Yesterday my DD and her friend found a little Whitetail Fawn in one of our pastures. It was pretty beaten up from running into the fence so we cleaned it's wounds and put antibiotic ointment on the cuts and placed it back in the pasture with a bucket of water, thinking that it's Mom would come back to get it.

Well, it was still there this morning. :doh:

Now what? :shrug: :help:

The local Animal Control and state Fish and Wildlife Commission where of no help this morning.

I won't mind caring for it, if I knew what to do (I figure it could hang with the goats). Can it eat the same feed? :shrug:

Here are some pictures:

My DD's friend holding it while we were patching it up:



After we put it back in the pasture:






Any suggestions would be appreciated,

Thanks,
\

I worked for a lady once who raised a fawn. She let it in the house and it would even sleep on the bed with her. It was very tame. I don't know if it ate her plants because I don't think she had any.

However, it did end up eating some house insulation which had been left out and it died.

Call your local conservation agent and find out the name of the person who takes in abandoned fawns. There are always a few around that have been approved by the the Department of Conservation (at least here in Missouri there are). That way you can be certain they will be cared for properly and you don't have to deal with it.

donsgal
 

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If I need a Shelter
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Shouldn't of ever messed with it.I had a Fawn in one of my pastures couldn't get out,his Mom would jump the Fence and feed him.One day after I took Stock out of there,he was walking the fence I open the Gate where he could get out.

That one I would put down before it gets any bigger.

big rockpile
 

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Go to Google and put in Orlando Wildlife Rescue and there is definitely information. S.
 
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