Ford 9N stalls

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Oggie, Aug 15, 2006.

  1. Oggie

    Oggie Waste of bandwidth Supporter

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    I've been given a Ford 9N mainly because it won't run well. It will start if I hold the choke button out, but stalls when I increase the throttle or let go of the choke. There's a funny (sort of mourning dove-like) sound coming through the intake stack that grows louder as the engine speed increases until the tractor stalls. I really haven't had a chance to look it over well. It was dropped off Sunday and I need to pull it to a better location with a larger tractor. They guy who left it suspects bad fuel, but if that were the case I don't think it would start in the first place.

    Any ideas before I open the hood and begin randomly stumbling around?
     
  2. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    Intake valve stuck open or burnt? Run a compression check.
     

  3. Oggie

    Oggie Waste of bandwidth Supporter

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    I don't have the equipment to do a compression check.
    Would carb cleaner help free a valve or other stuck intake part?

    I'd like to be able to move the little tractor and take the rake off the 3-point so I can get it near the shop. Otherwise, I'll have to take move it with a larger tractor and that's a tight fit.
     
  4. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Clean the carb and adjust it properly. Clean the air cleaner and refill with oil to the proper level. Make sure all of the hoses etc in the air cleaner to carb connections are tight, no leaks of air.

    f I had been given a tractor, I would go out and buy a compression tester if I didn't have one, if I thought it would help me get it running. :) There is a decent reprint service manual available for these tractors, too, that might be worth getting if you hope to keep and use the tractor.
     
  5. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Sounds like a carb to manifold air leak to me, get it running and have someone else spray WD 40 in that area, any speed increase is proof positive of an air intake leak.
     
  6. Oggie

    Oggie Waste of bandwidth Supporter

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    I plan on buying a compression tester. I borrowed one earlier when I had a Ford 3000 that needed work. I have a newer tractor now and comperssion won't be a problem for quite a while.

    But the guy with the 9N was returning my landscape rake. The tractor was acting up and had been for a while. He asked, "Do you want it?" I said, "Sure!"

    My away from the homestead work schedule is a killer right now and I won't have a chance to really look at the 9N until probably Saturday. I was hoping that there might be a way to move it closer to the shop. If I have to, I'll use a frontend loader to remove the rake and then pull the 9N with the bigger tractor or a truck.

    Thanks for your suggestions. This old tractor is new to me and I could use all the experience you can provide. I'll keep you posted.
     
  7. tsherry

    tsherry Member

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    I have an 8n, and have some experience with a similar problem. It's probably fuel system/intake related. Also, there are a TON of internet resources available for these. A couple are http://yesterdaystractors.com/, and just8ns.com. These places carry dang near every part you will need to keep it going over time.

    If the tractor has been sitting for any number of years, the carb is probably sticky and full of crud. The original carbs have a fuel bowl and needle valve at the bottom of the carb. My carb float bowl was literally full of hardened crud that made it through the fuel bowl. Carefully remove the float bowl from the carb and clean it. It is possible to remove the entire carb, disassemble it, clean it, and put it back together without a kit...but kits are cheap and will help keep things nice and tight.

    Check and clean the oil bath air cleaner and hoses for 'clean' and tight. Yellow jackets like to nest in mine. And the rubber hoses than connect the metal pipe to the air cleaner and carb can split, also causing a weird noise.

    It is well worth the investment to change all the plugs and plug wires, as well as the points. I spent about fifty bucks on all of that, and ended up with a great running tractor.

    Good luck!
     
  8. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Thanks for the advice here tsherry. Just wanted to say "Welcome" also. btw, you have me hanging on each chapter of "Shatter". Keep up the good work and again, welcome to HT.
     
  9. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Certainly sounds like a crudded up fuel bowl. That said these old beasts benefit from a full tune up regularly, and that includes retiming. Never had an 9N but a few Fergies of similar design and vintage.
     
  10. Oggie

    Oggie Waste of bandwidth Supporter

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    Here's an update. I cleaned the fuel sediment bowl and ran about a quart of fresh gas through the fuel line. The air cleaner chamber and the oil in the oil bath were filthy. I removed the air intake system and cleaned it with gas and carb cleaner. I also cleaned the exterior of the carb and sprayed the interior with carb cleaner.

    Before I did any of that, the starter had to be replaced. The retainer ring broke and the spring retention washer popped off. The starter motor would spin, but not engage the fly wheel. The guy at the starter repair shop said that the brushes and other parts were too worn to just repair it, so it was replaced with a rebuilt starter ($104).

    After I put the air intake system back together, it started right up. I took it on a victory lap down the road to the mail box (about a quarter of a mile). I was feeling good, wind in my hair in third gear! But, when I turned around to go back to the barn, it died as though I had shut the key off. It ran very sporadically after that and I had to limp home, coasting down a hill most of the way.

    Now my eye is on the ignition system. This tractor had been converted to 12 volts. The distributor is on the front of the engine, kind of behind the alternator. The radiator is in front of the distributor, blocking most of the view and access. Any tips about how folks get to that part of the tractor would be helpful. Am I going to have to take the hood off the tractor to get access to the distributor? Or is there another trick? Also do most folks go the Ford/New Holland dealer (about a 45 min. drive for me) for parts or is there a better source online?
     
  11. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The distributor on the front is sort of a pain, but I don't have too much trouble getting mine off--but I have the stock 6v generator, not sure how much more room the alternator conversion might take up. I found that replacing the distibutor cap, points, and condenser made a big difference on my 9N, but I still have problems with it starting sometimes, and if the distributor gets wet, I have no choice but to wait until it dries off before it will run again.

    Sometimes I think these old machines are set in their ways and crotchety.
     
  12. countrymech

    countrymech Well-Known Member

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    The distributor is a pain to get to but it can be done without taking the hood off. I converted my 8N over to 12 volt last year and find that it is a little easier to swing the alternator and loosen the belt to get it out of the way. Most of my parts are ordered on line. Its alot easier to call Mike's Tractors. They are a wealth of info and usually know exactly what you need. They know these tractors inside and out and their pricing is usually slightly cheaper than most. I have read that these 12 volt conversion coils are very prone to failure. There use to be a method of converting the stock coil on the web. It was kinda invovlved but it allowed the use of a heavier and readily available 12 volt coil, the cylinder type. I'll try to find the link. My tractor just started this same problem last week while I was mowing some large weeds. I had a backfire and now the thing just seems to choke itself out when it runs for a couple minutes. I just haven't had time to look into it. Another good site for info is Ntractorclub.com. The forums and DIY albums are great. Good luck with your quest and keep us posted, Paul.
     
  13. countrymech

    countrymech Well-Known Member

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    Here are a couple of links that may be of use. the first one is the link to Larry Henry's 12 conversion which discusses the coil conversion. Enjoy.
    http://members.cox.net/sean.monaghen/larry12volt.pdf#search='8n%20coil%20conversion'
    http://www.mikestractors.com/
    http://ntractorclub.com/
     
  14. Oggie

    Oggie Waste of bandwidth Supporter

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    Thanks much for the links.

    I checked out the N Tractor Club site. There's a lot of stuff that will be very useful. I'll take the drstributor off this weekend and see if I can make any sense of it.