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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!
My fine husband broke new ground yesterday with his Ford 8N tractor and Ford single bottom plow. See pictures. Our questions now are:
1. Should he go back in and plow some more? There remain strips of unbroken sod, but the plow tends to slide back into the same ditch and it tends to gather up all the sod and pulls it to the end of the row.
2. Should he move to the disc now? We have a 7’ Ford flexo-hitch disc.
3. Does the soil need to dry out first?
4. How much should he disc before using the walk-behind tiller?
Please forgive our ignorance, but this is our first time with all of this wonderfulness! We’re so excited but need a bit of help!
Thank you again & again!
Denise & Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hello!
My fine husband broke new ground yesterday with his Ford 8N tractor and Ford single bottom plow. See pictures. Our questions now are:
1. Should he go back in and plow some more? There remain strips of unbroken sod, but the plow tends to slide back into the same ditch and it tends to gather up all the sod and pulls it to the end of the row.
2. Should he move to the disc now? We have a 7’ Ford flexo-hitch disc.
3. Does the soil need to dry out first?
4. How much should he disc before using the walk-behind tiller?
Please forgive our ignorance, but this is our first time with all of this wonderfulness! We’re so excited but need a bit of help!
Thank you again & again!
Denise & Dan
Forgot the pics! Here they are!
Sky Cloud Plant Tree Land lot
 

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Unapologetically me
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If it was me, I'd disk it assuming it's not gummy wet.
You might have to run a harrow over it after that, or just rake it smooth.
I guess it depends on what you are planting.
 

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Disc and disc some more. It appears your plow needs some adjusting. I presume it’s a 16” one bottom? If so make sure the point and landside are sixteen inches in from the inside of the rear tire. You may need to reset tire width to accomplish this. That way your plow will turn the sod evenly as you run the rear tire in the last furrow. The landslide needs to follow straight behind the point to keep the plow where it belongs. congrats on your progress!
 

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Not bad for a first go.

Follow what Evons hubby ^^^^^^^^^^ said and you'll be ploughing arrow straight furrows in no time... above all, don't get discouraged... it's all a learning curve.

Happy :) Homesteading!
 
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Take a look at the chain setup that limit the sideways travel of the raising and lowering arms. If you set up the plow as Evons hubby says, the plow will be correct, but it will still pull hard right to the furrow side and will need a very tight chain to stop it. The pin with Cotter key will have to be hardened steel, too. The coulter (disc wheel that passes ahead of the plow itself--if there is one--should be set about one inch to the left of the plow body and adjusted to a depth about four inches deep, to shear off the beginning of the furrow side. The plow share should have a duck bill at the point so it will bite into the soil the moment the plow is lowered at the beginning of the row. The technical term for that is "suck". The shear will want to go all the way to China, so you will have to adjust the wing nut limiter on the hydraulic quadrant lever on the right side near the seat so the hydraulics will keep it at the limit and not bog down. You can adjust the suck somewhat by turning the center mounting point. Since your right wheel will be about six inches lower than the left one, you can turn the arm leveler to adjust the plow level at the new position. Also, the amount of plowing you have done there is probably not yet enough to polish the rust off the steel; soil and sod roots will want to cling to it and not slide through. That is called "scouring." And one more thing: you can make a headland on each end by plowing across it two or three strips to get some depth to where the plow slid into the beginning and ending. You'll get a bumpy ride, but the depth of the ends will be as deep as the rest.

Plowing Instructions For The DEARBORN MOLDBOARD PLOW (ntractorclub.com)

This may help. It references a two bottom plow, which is what were usually sold with the N-Series tractors, but the methods are the same. With a one bottom, you'll have to slide the plow to the right on the mounting shaft so it will track with the N-Series tractor.

I would hope for a long spell of dry weather so as to allow as many as possible of those sod roots to dry out. and not reset them. If weather looks like rain, I would go ahead and disc away-2--3 times, lengthwise, then at angles, to smooth out the soil--you'll be contending with that grass all summer long anyway, so..... Your disc , if it, too is a three-point, will have some sort of angle adjustments, the more extreme angles for the first pass, then less of angle for finishing passes with no middle ridges. The Ford hydraulic system has no downforce--the depth is strictly by the screw in, screw out action of the three point hitch which changes the level of each gang. Plus concrete blocks, if you have them. BTW, grease the bearings.

"Plowing straight furrows is a learning curve." Isn't that an oxymoron?

geo
 

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Problem with disking and area that small is you will be constantly turning or turning around which will create valleys and humps.
If you know anyone with a rotary tiller, you could run over that in one pass and have it powdered up nice.
 

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Problem with disking and area that small is you will be constantly turning or turning around which will create valleys and humps.
If you know anyone with a rotary tiller, you could run over that in one pass and have it powdered up nice.
I believe the Ford Flexohitch is a three-point setup which will allow it to be raised and lowered outside of the disced area, so the turning can be done on the grass and avoid the ridges and hollows that turning with a pull behind disc will make. Only problem might be wearing out the brakes of the 8N on the turnarounds.

geo
 

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Furrows in the pic look great for a first time, even with plow faults. The above advice is as good as you need to get. I hate Ford tractors, but like their pks lol. If yer husband has just bought it. Prepare to here some colorful language, and find that he ll become a better mechanic, or hunt for a friend that is one. l,ol
 

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I think Bill hates Fords like I hate goats. You can get the Ford N-series shop manual from the rack at TSC or similar. store. It'll still be in the rack, most of the other tractor repair manuals (the ones Bill likes are usually out of stock, they sell so many). You can still get a few basic parts from the TSC stores, like mufflers, sediment bowls, etc. A good tractor forum to join for information and advice is Yesterdays Tractors, with sub-forums for most of the tractor makes. It also has an on-line parts supply catalog, by make of tractor.

(I think he hates Fords because he can't figure out how to start 'em. (No crank.) ;)

geo
 
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