Ford 600 leaking oil

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by ravenstark, Feb 1, 2005.

  1. ravenstark

    ravenstark Member

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    I noticed a 1/8 to 3/16 inch wide and 3/16 to 1/4 inch long notch of metal missing from the engine block near the oil pan. That appears to be why it is leaking oil from that general area. I think the block may be cast iron so I don't want ot weld it. Would JB weld seal it? Or does anyone have a better suggestion?

    Also, there is a steel pipe which crosses over the bolts that hold on the oil pan. I'm pretty sure the pipe has to do with the hydraulic system. I may need to remove that pipe to remove the oil pan (grrr). If I do, I wonder how I can get air back out of the system? Is it like car brakes with some way to bleed out the air?
     
  2. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Try thightening the oil pan bolts first, spray a cleaner on the area and establish that that is the place the leak is comming from before you spend the time and effort to make a maybe unnecessary repair. What cubic inch engine are talking about?
     

  3. herefordman

    herefordman Well-Known Member

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    wonderful stuff JB weld, just make sure its all clean and dry, NO OIL anywhere or it will be a big waste of time, it will not stick to oil.
     
  4. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hummm. would be worried about metal missing, why is it missing? But i'd try the JB stuff as well I guess.

    As to the pipe from the pump down to the rear of the tractor, there are 2 types of hyd pump, a vane or a rotary pump - they have slightly different pipes as well. Vane is older. You can bleed one of the pumps with a little bleed screw, sometimes add a little oil to the bleed hole to get it fired up. With a totally empty pipe, might have to add 5 psi of air pressure into the oil resivor. For better ideas, go to the Ford section of www.ytmag.com .

    --->Paul
     
  5. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    This is a little gap between the oil pan and the block? I'd say you need a new oil pan gasket. It may look like part of the block because of paint. The tube could be an electrical conduit or an oil cooler line or as you say hydraulic. Be nice to it regardless.
     
  6. ravenstark

    ravenstark Member

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    Thank you all. I guess the chipped out area doesn't go all of the way past the oil pan gasket because tightening the bolts did stop the leak. I'm still concerned that it may be a crack extending vertically into the block. I noticed there is some water in the oil--oil looks like coffee with cream in it (but only near the oil pan leak, not at the dipstick). I'm trying to convince myself that the 3 hurricanes that came through here put the water in the oil, not a leak in the block between the coolent system and the oil system. If there is still no leakage tomorrow I'll change the oil and see what happens. If the block really is badly cracked, is there anything I could do to fix it? It doesn't set well with me, the idea of being the last owner in its 50 year history, the one who killed it and abandoned it to the scrap heap.
     
  7. ex mek

    ex mek Member

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    IF it is a crack and you cant weld it (stainless steel rods work on cast iron) then it is posible to "Stitch It " its a long hard way of doing it but it works ,
    find the end of the crack then drill and tap it using a " starter " tap NOT a Botom tap of say 1/4 dia bolt ,DO NOT tap thread all the way thru the bolt needs to bind where there is little or no thread . tighten in the bolt use some sealer on the thread and cut the head off flush , then drill down the edge of the bolt folowing the crack ,tap and fit the bolt cut the head off , and carry on like that untill you get to the other end of the crack ,
    its an awefull slow job but it works , it was used before electric welding could weld cast iron
    I have used this method while working in the boon docks miles from nowhere on Cummins Diesels driving pumps. it works on water as well as oil