foraging

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by wizzard, Aug 13, 2005.

  1. wizzard

    wizzard future nomad

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    Apr 26, 2005
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    ky
    i was just wondering if anyone on the board does any foraging for wild edibles. this is something i have just recently been inclined to learn. i have identified a few plants around my area, but i have been looking for a way to get a more positive ID by a second party.
     
  2. mulliganbush

    mulliganbush Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Tennessee
    One of the best ways is to contact your state department of wildlife. They either conduct wild edible walks, etc., or they can put in touch with local plant groups.

    Ray
     

  3. CurtisWilliams

    CurtisWilliams Well-Known Member

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    North of Omaha, on the banks of the 'Muddy Mo'
    I'll pick and eat a few wild plants in season. I only know a few, wood sorrell, curley dock, dandelion, milkweed and a couple others. As I learn more, I hope to add a little more variety to my 'wild salads'.
     
  4. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Canada
    I chewed on a bit of the tender stalk of cattail today. Much of this plant is edible and can make a flour from the roots. I haven't done that yet.

    Earlier I picked fiddleheads and found morel mushrooms.

    I have a patch of burdock which I understand the roots are good and edible called Gobo in Japan.

    Blueberries and saskatoon berries currently are at the peak of their prime and delicious. In a month, wild high bush cranberries should be coming into ripening mode after frost.
     
  5. moldy

    moldy Well-Known Member

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    KS
    I have been known to fix dandelion greens or goosefoot salad for supper in the spring. That's about it. I would like to learn more, just need a few extra hours in the day.
     
  6. Nan

    Nan Well-Known Member

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    I LOVE Morels! We use to hunt them where we used to live. I haven't found a place here yet....or even know if they have them here! I also like lamb's quarters. It grows everywhere and it tastes a lot like spinach. I have heard somewhere that it is even better for you than spinach! I also like poke greens, blackberries, chokecherrys(to make jam), elderberries, persimmons, and black walnuts! YUM! Oh....forgot...I like sand plum jelly too! There were other mushrooms that my neighbors ate, but I am too big of a chicken to eat anything but the morels! We tried soaking and rinsing and parboiling..and rinsing....then drying and grinding acorns. My children are part Native American and they wanted to try them. We decided that we would only eat them if we were starving!
     
  7. bugstabber

    bugstabber Chief cook & weed puller Supporter

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    South Dakota
    I found an elderberry last year on our place, and am watching another tree which may be choke cherry. I know of a few weeds that are edible, but don't currently eat. Wild plums, we enjoy them too.
     
  8. pyper7

    pyper7 pyper7

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    Aug 2, 2005
    Location:
    Lancaster County, Pa.
    Hi Wizzard, I've been becoming slowly addicted to wild edibles for a few years. It is slow going when you are learning on your own, but there are some really good field guides to look for. Edible Wild Plants, North American Field guide by Elias & Dykeman, Guide to Northeastern Wild Edibles by E. Barrie Kavasch, Peterson's Edible Wild Plants Eastern/Central North America are afew of the ones I own. I would also suggest ebay to start your search, you may find these cheaper than bookstores, but Amazon.com does carry quite a few and gives free shipping over $25.00 orders. I also would recommend finding out if there is a Mushroom Club in your area. There are loads of books on identifying mushrooms available and alot of mushroomers are of like mind!
     
  9. Nan

    Nan Well-Known Member

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    Culpepper is right! I heard the story of the park ranger taking a lunch break. He put a leaf of something or the other in his sandwich and he died! I don't know if that is an Urban legend or not, but it sure is something to be aware of! The things that we eat around here are only things that we have known exactly what they are! Unless of course we eat out at a Chinese restaurant! :sing: I know, bad joke, but I couldn't resist!