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I thought this was kinda cool. If it has been posted I am sorry. I just thought it looked interesting since times have gotten so hard.
http://www.survival-homestead.com/one-year-supply-of-food.html

It makes it a little more do-able, if you don't have alot of money on hand. Or if you don't know where to start.
Not sure if it goes here, if not move it ,I figured families would find it useful.:icecream:
 

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Obviously I overeat. I think I'd starve if I had to survive on nothing more than that list. I'd be out of soup on day 30! LOL
 

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None of the food was that good for you though. You will have high blood pressure by the time your 30. We eat healthy and for less than $10 a person. We have 6 people and spend $50 and always have healthy meals. I can't say we are perfect but tomato soup has sodium cream of mushroom soup has sodium macroni has sodium. I know most things do to some extent but these are high sodium foods. Technically you got eat those .10 ramen soup packages everyday to. You could eat the whole year on $15 bucks. But your savings will go to blood pressure meds hehehe! And those vitamins are fake if they are that cheap they aren't live vitamins. Okay the healthy herbalist will be quiet now hehehe;)!
 

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Forgot to mention what if you get the flu aspirin won't do a thing. Important things are really missing from that list. Opps I am keeping quiet sorry!
 

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I agree allot is missing, but if the article is targeting people who have never put away food stock, it's a good one. It shows how with just a little planning and a few dollars, you can make a pantry. I would hope most people would realize that there are elements from that list are are sorely missing. But face it, in a SHTF scenario, your more likely to share your home canned green beans with someone that brings a package of crackers and peanut butter then someone that comes empty handed.

As far as a "Hey ya'll, open you eyes, it's not that hard" article, I think it's good. But I agree, I don't care for the menus that would be developed from that list.
 

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Down in Survival forum, (where people do not bite even if they do wear tin foil hats :D) there are threads on how to have the food and other items needed for however long YOU decide you need to prepare for.

You are welcome to come down and give it a try.

Angie
 

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I do agree that the article does present the idea of getting started in small, manageable increments. But it has so many deficiencies as a ready to follow plan.

45 cans of tomato soup and 30 cans mushroom soup are not enough vegetables and 15 cans tuna fish and 5 lbs of peanut butter is not enough protein. Macaroni and cheese is not real food, why waste money on it? Why waste money on ready to serve foods at all?

I really question any math that says 2 people can eat on a sustained basis for $10 a week, unless it includes hunting and gathering, a substantial garden, with seed saving plan and major food preservation.

I guess you need to follow the links to all the products associated with this site.

A systematic plan for putting away food needs a plan for consuming systematically as well.
 

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What I want to know is where you folks are finding 10 lb bags of powdered milk for $10 or less??? 3lb bags here are $20, at least -- sometimes more if you buy the "good" stuff.
 

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I figure I might as well share the shopping list that I have saved on my computer. I've posted it a couple times before, but I really love it. One of my favorite things is that it matches up with a lot of the times that things go on sale, so you are buying them for the year when they are cheapest. You will be spending slightly more each week than some of the other lists, but you can also buy a 6 months supply rather than a year, or whatever you feel you need. It does list very specific foods and quantities, but it also has a lot of room for leeway and decisions based on your own family's needs.

Week 1 Nuts--get them on sale after Christmas. Drug stores are often
a good source. Dry roasted keep best. Freeze bagged ones. 21 lbs. per
person

Week 2 Detergents, Bleaches, Cleansers. Bleach 1 gal per person,
Laundry soap, 20 lbs per person.

Week 3 Medicine Chest: feminine products, Pepto bismol, cough syrup,
Tylenol, Calamine lotion, Kaopectate, Ipecac, sun screen, etc.
Dispose of all outdated medications

Week 4 Canned meats: Tuna, Spam, Dried Beef

Week 5 First Aid supplies: Band aids, antibiotic ointment, Ace
bandages, steri-strips, etc.

Week 6 Fill your water jugs

Week 7 Peanut butter 10 lbs per person

Week 8 Solid vegetable shortening lbs. per person

Week 9 Juices. Avoid watered products. Get 100% juice.

Week 10 Toothpaste, floss, razors, shaving cream

Week 11 Mixes, cake, pancake, muffin, etc. Purchase or make your own.
counts for part of grain requirement. you need an annual total of 300
lbs of grain products per person.

Week 12 Spices and herbs---look for bargains at health food stores or
ethnic food stores.

Week 13 Rice buy 10, 15, or 20 pounds. Counts toward grain total

Week 14 More First Aid: gauze patches, swabs. cotton balls, tape,
etc.

Week 15 Pasta. Select a variety. Counts toward grain total

Week 16 Dry Milk. 100 lbs per person per year

Week 17 - Assemble emergency sewing kit: thread, pins, needles,
buttons, snaps, zippers, tape measure, scissors.

Week 18 - Flour. Consider your families needs. 50 lbs per person?
counts toward grain

Week 19 - Dry or canned soup

Week 20 - Gelatin or Pudding mixes

Week 21 - Buy garden seeds locally, if you haven't mail ordered them.
Get only what you will plant and eat. Also consider what you can
preserve and eat.

Week 22 - More Flour! 50 lbs per person total.. counts toward grains

Week 23 - Cord, twine or light rope. Flashlights and batteries.

Week 24 - Freeze cheese. Grate and freeze for casseroles or soups.

Week 25 - Paper towels, aluminum foil, garbage bags. freezer bags,
etc.

Week 26 - Vinegars: If you make pickles, have several gallons on hand

Week 27 - Condiments: mustard, mayo, relish, Worcestershire

Week 28 - Jams and jellies. Buy what you will not make yourself.

Week 29 - Canned goods. Buy what you eat. veggies: lbs. per person,
fruits,: 80 quarts per person

Week 30 - Canned milk Check Dec 1989 Ensign for use Ideas

Week 31 - Back to school supplies and office supplies

Week 32 - Baking powder, soda, cornstarch. Baking soda 2 lbs per
person, soda albs per

Week 33 - Tomatoes juice, sauce, whole or paste. Buy it or make it.
part of veggies

Week 34 - Canned Fruit, buy or can 80 quarts per person

Week 35 - More canned fruits and veggies 150 total per person per
year

Week 36 - Buy an extra 25 pounds of sugar 100lbs per person total

Week 37 - Can or freeze veggies from garden or fresh purchased, or
buy more canned 150 lbs per person per year

Week 38 - Dried beans, peas. 100 lbs per person

Week 39 - Sweeteners. Honey, Molasses, etc. counts toward sugars

Week 40 - Iodized Salt. Ten or more containers. For canning use, get
canning salt.

Week 41 - Personal products: soap, deodorant, toilet paper, shampoo,
etc. Hand soap, 15 per person, TP: one roll per week

Week 42 - Canned soups: counts toward veggies

Week 43 - Can something with apples.

Week 44 - Hard candy for Halloween. Leftovers will make a good
addition to your 72 hour emergency kit.

Week 45 - Vitamins. Get some extra C and Calcium. 365 vitamins per
person.

Week 46 - Treats for baking: Cocoa, coconut, nuts, chocolate chips,
etc

Week 47 - Rolled oats, corn meal, cream of wheat...Part of grains

Week 48 - Sugars, brown, white, powdered. counts toward 100lbs per
person total

Week 49 - Vegetable and olive oils. Get a good quality. 12 lbs. per
person

Week 50 - Candles and matches. Put in a cool place and in a sturdy box
(preferably fireproof) that you can locate in the dark.

Week 51 - Popcorn. Go for the big bags. Counts toward grains

Week 52 - Merry Christmas. Give yourself a great gift--security for
an extended period.
This is from the OHG (organic homestead gardening) yahoo group.

Kayleigh
 

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240 lbs of sugar?! We don't use 5# a year. And all that salt- both in the food, and buying salt itself. A 1# container lasts us at least 6 months to a year. I could comfortably survive on no added sugar or salt, although i guess the salt is necessary for canning.
 

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I can see needing to store several hundred lbs of sugar if you use koolaid, can fruits, make jelly, etc. I think mom used to buy 100 lb bags and she'd use a couple of them every fall.

The LDS site has a food storage calculator that I used once. It totally amazed me how much food it takes to feed a single person for a full year. I put in a family of 4 and was blown away with how much it said a family that size will use in a year.

I had a Mormon friend years ago that did the two years storage like the church recommended back then. She had 2 barrels of wheat berries in a storage shed. I have no idea what else she had stored, but I can only imagine how shocked the movers were every time they moved (we were all military at that time and usually moved every 2 or 3 years, sometimes every year.)

She was a great neighbor who taught me to make zucchini bread, and a lot of other scratch recipes. She had a lot of influence in reminding me how nice it is to have a pantry to cook from.
 

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200lbs or more of sugar isn't much when you start looking at canning fruit. That uses a lot.
 

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double post.
 
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