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SM Entrepreneuraholic
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Daftari is right, and not just about Iran (and Iraq), but also Sri Lanka, where protesters angry at the soaring prices of everyday commodities including food, have burned down homes belonging to 38 politicians as the crisis-hit country plunged further into chaos, with the government ordering troops to "shoot on sight."

Police in the island nation said Tuesday that in addition to the destroyed homes, 75 others have been damaged as angry Sri Lankans continue to defy a nationwide curfew to protest against what they say is the government's mishandling of the country's worst economic crisis since 1948. link

Texas Power Grid Operator Urges Customers To Conserve Electricity After Six Plants Go Offline

Heading into the weekend, ERCOT warned about a heatwave that would send electricity demand to record levels. With 2,900 MW of electricity removed from the grid as energy demand increases, this could strain the state's power system.

PowerOutage.US shows that 14,000 customers in Texas are without power on Saturday morning.

The Real Reason Behind The EU's Drive To Embargo Russian Oil

This week the European Union is expected to announce a complete import ban on Russian oil. Hungary, in its first real act of defiance, is threatening to veto this; Germany, after some hemming and hawing, has finally decided it can survive such a ban.

Assuming Hungary’s objections are eventually overcome, at first blush this looks like yet another energy “own goal” by the people obsessed with soccer. The U.S. has already issued this ban.
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What is clear to any serious observer of EU politics is that they are not interested in what their people have to say or want.
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Unfortunately, we are living through a time where the most powerful people in the world (at least in their minds) are openly trying to destroy the petroleum market for their own purposes and agenda. They are actively working to make oil and gas prices volatile to the point of destroying investment in the industry.

They make no bones about this. Oil is the bane of the planet!

I call these people The Davos Crowd (for a description of them see my podcast, Episodes 75, 76, and 77 for the background information). They are the unelected oligarchs, bankers, hereditary power and newly Made Men (in the mafia sense) who gather at Davos, Switzerland, every year to decide on the future of humanity.

And it is their agenda, using Climate Change and international threats like biowarfare and terrorism as their justifications for a massive expansion of the surveillance state and their control over all things, but especially money.
 

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Mostly agree, but there is another twist in the plot. Most of those countries know that the proven oil reserve has an end point. Don't know when we would run out, but eventually we would. Yes, alternatives are coming on line. But not fast enough. So slow the use of oil and gas and you preserve your supply for later on. Sort of you can have all you want and have it cheap now, or have it to use for a long time.

Then add in there seems to be an inordinate anger at big oil. Yes, profits are good. Now. Some years not so much. But in comparison to some other industries, well, you make more money investing NOT in oil and gas but those other things, like Pepsi etc. And we can produce a gallon of milk a whole heck of lot cheaper than a gallon of gasoline. They usually track along pretty close to each other. But we scream about the evil oil and love the dairy farmer. Go figure.
Maybe more important these days, reliable energy allows poorer folks to take their own destiny in hand. Which the oligarchs in the green movement hate. They want us all state dependent for everything, and of course think God anointed them to run the state. Right now big oil is mostly grandpa's 401k and your cd in the bank owned. Those "windfall profits" the greens talk about mostly don't exist, and what do go right back into the pockets of hard working investors. Little guys with more than air between their ears.

Our state is being warned we will have power shortages this year because coal fired plants are going off line, natural gas plants are not that common in our region, and oops, in trying to switch us to wind and solar, which are good also, they did not get the grid up to speed for that. So we have a lot less power generation even as we need more.

But energy freedom is freedom. Since the greens refuse us ample reasonably priced energy, find ways to not use what they offer. Be energy independent as much as you can.
 

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These self procalimed experts are missing a big point-- Russia is still exporting its oil, so any token effort by the US et al has had no effect.

Russia still puts its oil into the general supply....If you have a feud with your neighbor on the other side of the lake, it doesn't make any sense to claim you'e not going to use any of the water that runs off his land when you go down to the shore to dip in your bucket.

It's the fault of the US that oil prices are so high-- our policies cut production here when the new administration took over 17 months ago.....

Why did they do it? Agenda 21/Alinsky's Rules for Radicals. ..They want chaos on the borders, crime in out streets, low supply of commodities..EVERYTHING they've done has that ccommon denominator-- CHAOS.
 

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This self proclaimed expert has 72 years in the industry. True, others are buying Russian oil. Untrue that our not buying it does not affect our price at the pump. And let a camel hiccup in the mideast and it WILL affect what you pay to make your F150 run.
 

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SM Entrepreneuraholic
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
These self procalimed experts are missing a big point-- Russia is still exporting its oil, so any token effort by the US et al has had no effect.

Russia still puts its oil into the general supply....If you have a feud with your neighbor on the other side of the lake, it doesn't make any sense to claim you'e not going to use any of the water that runs off his land when you go down to the shore to dip in your bucket.

It's the fault of the US that oil prices are so high-- our policies cut production here when the new administration took over 17 months ago.....

Why did they do it? Agenda 21/Alinsky's Rules for Radicals. ..They want chaos on the borders, crime in out streets, low supply of commodities..EVERYTHING they've done has that ccommon denominator-- CHAOS.
Yes and no. Russia's infrastructure is built to service Europe, not Asia.

What I found interesting is it appears the embargo is only on Russian oil, not Russian natural gas!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
doc- said:

It's the fault of the US that oil prices are so high
It is not a fault, it is a feature, to drive us green.
My understanding is the easy oil in US is already in production. The remaining oil is more risk and more expense which is why the oil companies are not going after it. Plus our refineries are at capacity.
 

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doc- said:

It's the fault of the US that oil prices are so high

My understanding is the easy oil in US is already in production. The remaining oil is more risk and more expense which is why the oil companies are not going after it. Plus our refineries are at capacity.
The Biden administration canceled one of the most high-profile oil and gas lease sales pending before the Department of the Interior, as Americans face record-high prices at the pump, according to AAA.
 

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But that would be years before oil came to market.
...but it's the general atttitude of the administration that affects decision making at the petro companies. They are unwiling to risk investments and ar quite satisfied with the profits from high prices-- good cash flow and no need to use up reserves. The perfect storm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
...but it's the general atttitude of the administration that affects decision making at the petro companies. They are unwiling to risk investments and ar quite satisfied with the profits from high prices-- good cash flow and no need to use up reserves. The perfect storm.
I agree. What bothers me is that I don't think there are any quick solutions. This is just the beginning of energy shortages. The city where I live used to be the home of Danriver Inc, which was at one time, the largest manufacturer of lightweight yarn-dyed fabrics in the US.

Danville is at the fall line, so the largest plant was able to use water power to generate electricity. All that has been disassembled and the city has been busy building solar farms. Neither the states nor the US has a coherent energy policy. Things are going to get worse, not better.
 

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I agree. What bothers me is that I don't think there are any quick solutions. This is just the beginning of energy shortages.
They canceled those leases because they said they weren't using them.
No, there won't be any short term solutions. Those leases were big projects, taking large investments, research and development. The oil companies were definitely interested. Those Alaskan leases were long term solutions that would also have help avoid predicaments like this. Allowing such long term projects like that inhibits their cause of grooming the public as they see fit.
 

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has anyone watched the documentary - Collapse ?

"Nothing grows forever, there is a cycle, birth, growth, maturation, decline and death."


I watched it before we moved from the city.
It was another catalyst to leave.
I'd rather be stranded here in the woods than in an overpopulated metropolis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
They canceled those leases because they said they weren't using them.
No, there won't be any short term solutions. Those leases were big projects, taking large investments, research and development. The oil companies were definitely interested. Those Alaskan leases were long term solutions that would also have help avoid predicaments like this. Allowing such long term projects like that inhibits their cause of grooming the public as they see fit.
As I understand it, some of the lease sites are just needed for access. I also read that most of the profitable oil is already in production, so a lot of the leases wouldn't be cost-effective to work.

I'm sure the fact the oil companies can't make long-term plans is also a big factor.
 
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